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Welcome! 




Welcome to the Community College of Indiana. This 
program guide is designed to help you plan your academic 
and career program. You'll find pages of useful information 
that will help you get the answers you need. 

The Community College of Indiana is a partnership between 
Ivy Tech State College and Vincennes University. The 
Community College of Indiana makes education more 
convenient, bringing a wide range of high quality courses 
close to home. 

The community college offers technical certificates and 
associate degrees. Ivy Tech State College's technical 
curriculum, coupled with Vincennes University's liberal arts 
curriculum, gives students a broad range of courses and 
degree programs. 

Students can earn two-year associate degrees or technical 
certificates from Ivy Tech State College or two-year liberal 
arts degrees from Vincennes University. Transfer agree- 
ments allow students to transfer credits toward a bachelor's 
degree at many four-year colleges and universities in and 
out of state. 

Great institutions are built through hard work and dedication, 
and the Community College of Indiana is certainly no excep- 
tion. Our administration, faculty, and staff devote countless 
hours to the goals and mission of the college. 

We look forward to serving you. Best wishes! 



Sincerely, 



r. &J^ 



Dr. Meredith L. Carter 
Chancellor 



Ivy Tech State College and Vincennes University are accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher 
Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 



Contents 



The College 3 

History of the college. Campus locations. 

Academic Programs 8 

Program offerings and requirements. 
Programs listed in alphabetical order. 

Course Descriptions 166 

The master list of all courses in alphabetical order. 

Key Contacts 220 

Student services. Academic services. Program chairs. 

Appendix 225 

Technology division goals. 




Visit www.ivytech.edu/indianapolis for 
the most current program information! 



Where To Get Answers 



Admissions 
(317)921-4800 

Financial Aid 
(317) 921-4777 

Registrar 
(317)921-4745 



Bursar 
(317)921 




Career and Employment 
(317)921-4881 



Testing and Assessment 
(317)921-4795 

Disability Support Services 
(317)921-4981 



Bodlcstore 
(317) 921-4793 

Library 
(317)921-4782 



Business and General Education Division 
(317) 921-4924 

Health and Public Services Division 
(317) 921-4450 

Technology Division 
(317)921-4759 



CD 



■ * ■» 



CD 
CD 



History 



Since its inception in 1963, Ivy Tech State 
College has evolved from a small, post-secondary 
vocational school providing specialized workforce 
training, to a community college system with 
sophisticated, high-tech course offerings. Now the 
third largest public higher education institution in 
Indiana, Ivy Tech serves more than 62,000 stu- 
dents per year statewide through its 23 -campus 
system. 

In 1963, Indiana Vocational Technical College 
was created by the Indiana General Assembly, 
with the support of the Indiana AFL-CIO, Indiana 
Farm Bureau and the state Chamber of 
Commerce. When college planners determined 
that occupational education and training needs 
differed around the state, the General Assembly 
approved the formation of 13 administrative 
regions to effectively serve the needs of each 
area. These regions were chartered between 1966 
and 1969. 

The Central Indiana Region was created to serve 
residents of Marion, Morgan, Hancock, Johnson, 
Shelby, Boone, Hendricks, and Hamilton coun- 
ties. Classes were first offered at a rented facility 
in what is now Indianapolis International Airport 
in 1966. That first year, the fledgling campus 
enrolled 367 students in three technical programs. 
In 1983, the main campus moved to the former 
American United Life building at the corner of 
Fall Creek and Meridian, where enrollment has 
continued to rise. By fall 2001, the campus was 
serving more than 10,000 students in 22 degree 
programs. 

In 1995, the college's name was changed from 
Indiana Vocational Technical College to Ivy Tech 
State College, reflecting a metamorphosis within 
the institution. 



Colleges and Schools. In addition, the transfer- 
ability of Ivy Tech credits continues to expand. 

Credits for many individual courses and several 
two-year degrees may now be transferred to other 
four-year colleges and universities and count 
toward a baccalaureate degree. 

Over the years, the nature of Ivy Tech's instruc- 
tional offerings has changed to meet the demands 
of the Indiana workforce. Formerly known for its 
vocational training, the college now offers 
degrees in many fast-growing, high-tech fields, 
for which Ivy Tech graduates are sought out by 
employers. 

The college now provides more information tech- 
nology training and produces more practical nurs- 
es than any other college in Indiana. Ivy Tech 
graduates work in fields ranging from respiratory 
therapy and computer-aided design to public safe- 
ty and visual communications. 

Offering Hoosiers a wider array of educational 
options is the reason for the latest big change at 
Ivy Tech State College. Beginning in fall 2000, 
partners Ivy Tech and Vincennes University 
formed the Community College of Indiana (CCI), 
adding liberal arts courses and associate of art 
degrees at Ivy Tech's Indianapolis campus. Over 
the next several years, the Community College of 
Indiana will expand to all 23 Ivy Tech State 
College campuses. 



Ivy Tech incorporated a number of changes, 
which allowed the college to gain statewide 
accreditation by the North Central Association of 



Community Campuses 



Avon High School 

7575 East, 150 South 

(317) 921-4461 or 1-800-624-7584 

Ben Davis High School 

1200 N. Girls School Rd. 
(317)921-4461 or (317) 241-0200 

Beech Grove High School 

5330 Hornet Avenue 
(317)921-4461 

Community Life and Learning Center 
515 E. Main Street, Carmel 
(317) 921-4461 or (317) 569-9203 

Danville High School 

100 WestviewDr. 

(317) 921-4461 or 1-800-624-7584 

Decatur Central High School 
5251 Kentucky Ave 
(317) 921-4461 or 1-800-624-7584 

Greenfield Central High School 
810 N.Broadway 
(317) 921-4461 or 1-800-624-7584 
After 6:00 p.m. call (317) 462-7984 

Lawrence (two locations) 
Public Safety (PB) 
9530 E. 59th St. 
Roosevelt Building (RB) 
9301 E. 59th St. 
Call (317) 917-5990, or 1-800-624-7584 

Lebanon High School 

510 Essex Drive 

(765) 482-6806, or 1-800-624-7584 



Noblesville High School 

18111 Cumberland Rd. 

(317) 921-4461 or (317) 773-4680 

Pike High School 

6701ZionsvilleRd. 
(317)921-4461 

Shelbyville 

Blue River Career Center 

801 St. Joseph Street 

(317) 392-3243 or 1-800-624-7584 

Walker Career Center 

Warren Central High School 
9651 East 21st Street 
(317) 532-6150 




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to 

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Mooresville High School 
550 N. Indiana 
(317)921-4461 




Noblesville High School 
18111 Cumberland Ed. 



Lebanon 
High School 
510 Essex Dr. 



Pike High School 
6701 Zionsville Rd. 



1-74 



1-65 



U.S. 31 



Community Life and 

Learning Center 

515 E. Main Street 

Carmel 



Danville 

High School 

100 Westview Dr. 



Avon High School 
7575 CR 150 S. 



I 




Step-By-Step 

Training and 

Education Center 



Rolls Royce Training Center 
2355 S. Tibbs 



Monument Circle 



Main Campus: 
One West 26th Street 
P.O. Box 1763 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
46206-1763 

617) 921-4800 
ivytech.edu/indianapolis 



1-70 



Automotive Technology 

Center 
1331 E. Washington St. 



Decatur Central High School 
5251 Kentucky Ave 



Mooresville 
High School 
550 N. Indiana 



1-465 



Walker Career Center 
9651 East 21st St. 



1465 



Greenfield Central 

High School 
810 N. Broadway 




Washington Street 



Blue River 
Career Center 



\ 



CCI programs are designed to meet the needs of the student 
population, accommodating those who wish to enroll in a 
few classes as well as those who prefer a full program. 
Credit programs normally culminate in the Associate of 
Science degree, the Associate of Applied Science degree, 
the Associate of Arts, the Technical Certificate, or the 
Career Development Certificate. The three instructional 
divisions are Business and General Education, Health and 
Public Services, and Technology. 

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) 
Degree 

Associate of Applied Science degree programs prepare stu- 
dents for career mobility within occupational clusters. The 
programs offer education in recognized specialties with 
emphasis on analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. The pro- 
gram content, which is approximately 75 percent technical 
and 25 percent general education, provides both depth and 
breadth in conceptual and manipulative skills. The general 
education courses, offered in the areas of communications, 
humanities, mathematics, life and physical sciences, and 
social sciences, equip students with the life skills they need 
to be fully functioning, contributing members of society. 
Ask for details from the Admissions Office staff on transfer 
opportunities. 

Associate of Science (AS) Degree 

Associate of Science degree programs prepare students for 
careers and also enable students who have an interest and 
ability to transfer Ivy Tech or VU credits to cooperating 
four-year institutions. These programs emphasize cognitive 
skills intended as pre-baccalaureate study and provide 
courses equivalent to those prescribed in the lower division 
of the receiving four-year college or university. 

Associate of Arts (AA) Degree 

The Associate of Arts programs prepare students to com- 
municate well, adapt to social and economic change, func- 
tion as team players, analyze issues, and solve problems. 
This program provides a solid foundation for continued 
study. Liberal arts is also a favorite choice for students who 
plan advanced study in medicine, law, or business. The 
program has been fully articulated with all Indiana four- 
year colleges. 



Technical Certificate (TC) 

The Technical Certificate programs provide training in con- 
ceptual and manipulative skills for specific occupations. 
Each program contains a sequence of required courses in a 
recognized specialty within one of the technologies taught 
at the college. The program content is designed to develop 
competency in the comprehension of general and technical 
skills in that specialty. 

Career Development Certificates 
(CDC) 

Ivy Tech provides short-term programs for individuals who 
desire to develop competencies in a specific area. These 
programs are less than 32 semester credits in length. 
Instruction is delivered through methods that include regu- 
lar courses and specifically-designed courses. Many of 
these courses are based on a sequence of learning experi- 
ences determined by a certifying state or national associa- 
tion or organization. Completion of certain short-term pro- 
grams qualifies students to sit for certification examina- 
tions. The number and types of short-term programs vary. 

Foundation for Academic Programs 

Ivy Tech offers a foundation of academic courses to assist 
students in successfully accomplishing their educational 
goals. 

In addition to foundation courses in mathematics and study 
skills, available services include academic assessment, 
career assessment and counseling, tutoring, and other aca- 
demic assistance. The need for these services may be iden- 
tified at the time of admissions, or a student may access 
services upon encountering academic difficulty during a 
course of study. Instructors and laboratory technicians pro- 
vide supplemental instruction in math, English, science, and 
study skills. Ivy Tech students preparing for the GED 
examination may take a practice test and receive academic 
counseling. 

Weekend College 

Weekend College is Ivy Tech 's way of providing an educa- 
tional opportunity to individuals who are unable to attend 
during regular weekday or evening hours. 

Weekend College offers a wide selection of credit courses 
and continuing education programs. 



ST 



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Academic Programs 



Accounting. 8 

Automotive Technology -12 

Business Administration 18 

Computer Information Systems 21 

Criminal Justice 28 

Design Technology. 31 

Early Childhood Education 37 

Electronics Technology 45 

General Technical Studies 48 

Hospitality Administration 53 

Human Services 59 

Liberal Arts 63 

Machine Tool Technology 73 

Manufacturing and Industrial Technology 77 

Medical Assistant 83 

Nursing 101 

Office Administration 117 

Paralegal 124 

Practical Nursing 126 

Public Safety Technology -132 

Radiologic Technology 137 

Respiratory Care 146 

Surgical Technology -160 
Visual Communications 164 



Accounting 



In the Accounting Program, students develop an understanding of accounting principles, business 
communications, business equipment and related areas of study in the business field. Instruction is 
offered in computerized accounting systems. Technical skills in financial accounting, cost accounting, 
and tax preparation are emphasized. 

Accounting includes maintaining journals and ledgers, processing banking transactions, billing, 
preparing payroll, maintaining inventory records, purchasing, processing expense reports, preparing 
financial statements, and analyzing managerial reports. Potential paraprofessional positions include 
junior or staff accountant, junior auditor, cost accounting clerk, bookkeeper, payroll clerk, inventory 
clerk, accounts receivable clerk, and financial 
management trainee. 

3 
Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 60 credits 

Associate of Science - 60 credits 

Career Development Certificate 



fid 
W 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 

AEC 100 Elements of Economics 

HEW 101 English Composition I 

HSS 143 Speech 

MAT 1 1 1 Intermediate Algebra OR 

MAT 112 Functional Mathematics 

xxx xxx Life/Physical Sciences Elective 

xxx xxx Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



Technical Core 

ACC 101 

ACC 102 

BUS 101 

BUS 102 

CIS 101 



OAD 



Principles of Accounting I 
Principles of Accounting II 
Introduction to Business 
Business Law 
Introduction to Microcomputers 



218 Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Specialty Core 

ACC 105 

ACC 201 

ACC 202 

ACC 203 

ACC 225 



Income Tax I 
Intermediate Accounting I 
Intermediate Accounting II 
Cost Accounting I 
Integrated Accounting Software 



15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Regionally Determined Core (choose three) 


ACC 


106 


Payroll Accounting 


ACC 


111 


Principles of Accounting Lab I 


ACC 


112 


Principles of Accounting Lab U 


ACC 


206 


Managerial Accounting 


ACC 


209 


Auditing 


ACC 


288 


Bridge to Intermediate Accounting 


BUS 


105 


Principles of Management 


BUS 


108 


Personal Finance 


BUS 


210 


Managerial Finance 


CIS 


207 


Access Database 


MKT 


101 


Marketing 


OAD 


288 


Office Calculation Machine 



9 credits 

3 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 



Note: For a complete list of regionally determined core classes, please see your program chair. 



10 



Associate of Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 



HSS 


143 


AEC 


100 


HEW 


101 


HEW 


102 


APO 


111 


MAT 


111 


APO 


151 


xxxx 


XXX 



24 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Suggested courses that help develop students for required courses. These courses are not required. 
ACC 288 Bridge to Intermediate 1 



Technical Core 

ACC 101 

ACC 102 

BUS 101 

BUS 102 

CIS 101 

OAD 218 



Speech 

Elements of Economics 
English Composition I 
English Composition II 
American National Government 
Intermediate Algebra 
Principles of Sociology 
Life/Physical Sciences Elective 



Principles of Accounting I 
Principles of Accounting II 
Introduction to Business 
Business Law 

Introduction to Microcomputers 
Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 



Specialty Core 




ACC 105 


Income Tax I 


ACC 201 


Intermediate Accounting I 


ACC 202 


Intermediate Accounting II 


ACC 203 


Cost Accounting I 


ACC 209 


Auditing 


ACC 225 


Integrated Accounting Software 



15 > 

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11 



Automotive Technology 



The Automotive Technology Program prepares students with the general and technical education need- 
ed for successful careers in automotive service, sales, technical support, management and customer 
relations, and for continuation in higher education. A two-year program requiring 66 credits leads to 
an Associate of Applied Science degree. 

ASSET Ford Motor Company Specialty 

ASSET is a joint partnership between Ford Motor Company, Ford and Lincoln-Mercury Dealers and 
Ivy Tech State College. ASSET is a two-year cooperative education program allowing you to earn 
while you learn at a Ford or Lincoln Mercury dealership. At the completion of the program you will 
have earned Ford Certification and an associate of applied science degree, and be off to a great career 
as an automotive service technician. 

ASEP General Motors Corporation Specialty 

Taking advantage of the partnership of General Motors, GM Dealerships and Ivy Tech State College, 
ASEP offers a two-year associate of applied science degree program that includes GM service techni- 
cian certification. ASEP allows you to alternate between formal classroom training and hands-on paid 
work experience at a local GM dealership. An associate degree, Factory GM certification, and paid 
co-op experiences make ASEP the premier way to become a GM technician. 

T-TEN Toyota Motor Sales, USA Specialty 

T-TEN is a partnership between Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Toyota and Lexus dealerships and Ivy 
Tech State College. The T-TEN program provides opportunities to study the latest automotive tech- 
nology, co-op at a Toyota or Lexus dealership, earn Toyota training certification and complete either a 
certificate or associate of applied science degree. In addition to the certified training, degree or certifi- 
cate completion, placement in a Toyota or Lexus dealership, the Toyota T-TEN program has a tool 
scholarship available to T-TEN students. 

TSEP AC Delco 

TSEP is a two-year college education program, combining classes in automotive technology with 
work experience in an independent service center. TSEP is a partnership between AC Delco, TSEP 
college, students, and service centers that are members of AC Delco Total Service Support (TSS) 
Program. TSEP allows students that want to work on all makes and models in a non-dealership envi- 
ronment the opportunity to gain state-of-the-art training, AC Delco certification along with their cer- 
tificate or degree. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 66 credits 
Career Development Certificate 

Average Salary 

$34,649 average starting salary based on graduate survey. 



12 



Associate of Applied Science 



Automotive Service Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 




18 credits 


HSS 143 


Speech OR 




HSS 148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


HEW 101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


SPS 101 


Physical Science 


3 


XXX XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


XXX XXX 


General Education Elective 


3 


Technical Core 




15 credits 


AMS 101 


Steering and Suspension System 


3 


AMS 113 


Electrical/Electronics I 


3 


AMS 109 


Engine Performance I 


3 


AMS 201 


Climate Control Systems 


3 


AMS 105 


Powertrain Service 


3 


Specialty Core 




33 credits 


AMS 107 


Engine Principles and Design 


3 


AMS 121 


Braking Systems 


3 


AMS 123 


Electrical/Electronics II 


3 


AMS 125 


Manual Drivetrain Service 


3 


AMS 127 


Engine Repair 


3 


AMS 135 


Automatic Transmission 


3 


AMS 209 


Engine Performance II 


3 


AMS 219 


Engine Performance EI 


3 


AMS 229 


Driveability Diagnosis 


3 


AMS 243 


Electrical/Electronics III 


3 


AMS 280 


Co-op/Internship 


3 



3s» 
m 

CD 

3 
o 



Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and in all eight areas of 
the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). 



as 

3 



13 



Associate of Applied Science 

Ford ASSET (Automotive Student Service Educational Training) Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Educa 


Hon Core 




18 credits 


HSS 


143 


Speech OR 




HSS 


148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


SPS 


101 


Physical Science 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


General Education Elective 


3 


Technical Core 






15 credits 


AMS 


101 


Steering and Suspension System 


3 


AMS 


113 


Electrical/Electronics I 


3 


AMS 


109 


Engine Performance I 


3 


AMS 


201 


Climate Control Systems 


3 


AMS 


105 


Powertrain Service 


3 


Specialty Core 






33 credits 


AMS 


107 


Engine Principles and Design 


3 


AMS 


121 


Braking Systems 


3 


AMS 


123 


Electrical/Electronics II 


3 


AMS 


125 


Manual Drivetrain Service 


3 


AMS 


127 


Engine Repair 


3 


AMS 


135 


Automatic Transmission 


3 


AMS 


209 


Engine Performance II 


3 


AMS 


219 


Engine Performance IQ 


3 


AMS 


229 


Driveability Diagnosis 


3 


AMS 


243 


Electrical/Electronics III 


3 


AMS 


280 


Co-op/Internship 


3 



Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and in all eight areas 
of the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). 



14 



Associate of Applied Science 

General Motors ASEP (Automotive Specialty Education Program) Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 

HSS 148 

HEW 101 

MAT 112 

SPS 101 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 



Technical Core 




AMS 


101 


AMS 


113 


AMS 


109 


AMS 


201 


AMS 


105 


Specialty Core 




AMS 


107 


AMS 


121 


AMS 


123 


AMS 


125 


AMS 


127 


AMS 


135 


AMS 


209 


AMS 


219 


AMS 


229 


AMS 


243 


AMS 


280 





18 credits 


Speech OR 




Interpersonal Communication 


3 


English Composition I 


3 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


Physical Science 


3 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


General Education Elective 


3 




15 credits 


Steering and Suspension System 


3 


Electrical/Electronics I 


3 


Engine Performance I 


3 


Climate Control Systems 


3 


Powertrain Service 


3 




33 credits 


Engine Principles and Design 


3 


Braking Systems 


3 


Electrical/Electronics II 


3 


Manual Drivetrain Service 


3 


Engine Repair 


3 


Automatic Transmission 


3 


Engine Performance II 


3 


Engine Performance III 


3 


Driveability Diagnosis 


3 


Electrical/Electronics III 


3 


Co-op/Internship 


3 



o 
&) 

a 

CD 

3 

dBSSBh 

o 



Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and in all eight areas 
of the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). 



o 

u3 






15 



Associate of Applied Science 



T-TEN (Toyota Technical Education Network) Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 

HSS 148 

HEW 101 

MAT 112 

SPS 101 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 



Technical Core 




AMS 


101 


AMS 


113 


AMS 


109 


AMS 


201 


AMS 


105 


Specialty Core 




AMS 


107 


AMS 


121 


AMS 


123 


AMS 


125 


AMS 


127 


AMS 


135 


AMS 


209 


AMS 


219 


AMS 


229 


AMS 


243 


AMS 


280 





18 credits 


Speech OR 




Interpersonal Communication 


3 


English Composition I 


3 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


Physical Science 


3 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


General Education Elective 


3 




15 credits 


Steering and Suspension System 


3 


Electrical/Electronics I 


3 


Engine Performance I 


3 


Climate Control Systems 


3 


Powertrain Service 


3 




33 credits 


Engine Principles and Design 


3 


Braking Systems 


3 


Electrical/Electronics II 


3 


Manual Drivetrain Service 


3 


Engine Repair 


3 


Automatic Transmission 


3 


Engine Performance II 


3 


Engine Performance HI 


3 


Driveability Diagnosis 


3 


Electrical/Electronics EQ 


3 


Co-op/Intemship 


3 



Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and in all eight areas 
of the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). 



16 



Associate of Applied Science 



TSEP AC Delco Specialty Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Educa 


tion Core 




18 credits 


HSS 


143 


Speech OR 




HSS 


148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


SPS 


101 


Physical Science 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


General Education Elective 


3 


Technical Core 






15 credits 


AMS 


101 


Steering and Suspension System 


3 


AMS 


113 


Electrical/Electronics I 


3 


AMS 


109 


Engine Performance I 


3 


AMS 


201 


Climate Control Systems 


3 


AMS 


105 


Powertrain Service 


3 


Specialty Core 






33 credits 


AMS 


107 


Engine Principles and Design 


3 


AMS 


121 


Braking Systems 


3 


AMS 


123 


Electrical/Electronics II 


3 


AMS 


125 


Manual Drivetrain Service 


3 


AMS 


127 


Engine Repair 


3 


AMS 


135 


Automatic Transmission 


3 


AMS 


209 


Engine Performance II 


3 


AMS 


219 


Engine Performance III 


3 


AMS 


229 


Driveability Diagnosis 


3 


AMS 


243 


Electrical/Electronics III 


3 


AMS 


280 


Co-op/Internship 


3 



CI 

s 



Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and in all eight areas 
of the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). 



o 



as 
3 



17 



Business Administration 



Specialties: 

Management 
Marketing 

The Business Administration Program gives graduates the broad background they need for general 
administrative positions in a variety of business environments. It also provides an opportunity for spe- 
cialization. A student in the Business Administration Program may specialize in management or mar- 
keting. 

Substitutions in the Business Administration Program are allowed when approved by the program 
chair. Normally, substitutions are granted in the Regional Core of the program. This practice is allowed 
to help students who feel their career goals are enhanced by taking different electives than recommend- 
ed. It is also necessary to allow transfer students some latitude to complete their degree as long as the 
General Education and State Technical Core are satisfied. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 60 credits 
Associate of Science - 63 credits 
Career Development Certificate 



18 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 Speech 

HEW 101 

MAT 111 

MAT 112 

*AEC xxx 

*xxx xxx 

*xxx xxx 



English Composition I 
Intermediate Algebra OR 
Functional Mathematics 
Economics Elective 
Life/Physical Sciences Elective 
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



Technical Core 

ACC 101 

BUS 101 

BUS 102 

BUS 105 

CIS 101 

MKT 101 



Principles of Accounting I 
Introduction to Business 
Business Law 
Principles of Management 
Introduction to Microcomputers 
Principles of Marketing 



Choose one of the following specialties: 

Management Specialty Core 

BUS 202 Human Resource Management 

BUS 203 Business Development 

BUS 204 Case Problems in Management 

BUS 210 Managerial Finance 

Management Regionally Determined Core 

*xxx xxx Approved Business Elective 
*xxx xxx Approved Business Elective 
*xxx xxx Approved Business Elective 
OPM 224 Operations Management 



18 credits 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 



': 



o 



Marketing Specialty Core 

BUS 204 Case Problems 

MKT 104 Promotions Management 

MKT 201 Introduction to Market Research 

MKT 220 Principles of Retailing 

Marketing Regionally Determined Core 

*xxx xxx Approved Business Elective 
*xxx xxx Approved Business Elective 
*xxx xxx Approved Business Elective 
OPM 224 Operations Management 

* Note: Foralistof approved efcctives, please see your program chair. 



12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



CO 

3 



19 



Associate of Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 63 credits. 



Students who wish to pursue their bachelor of science degree in Business Administration at Indiana State University and 
desire to take their first two years of that program at Ivy Tech State College should follow this curriculum: 



General Education Core 



HSS 


143 


HEW 


101 


HEW 


108 


MAT 


111 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 


Technical Core 




ACC 


101 


ACC 


102 


BUS 


101 


BUS 


102 


BUS 


230 


CIS 


101 


CIS 


102 


ECN 


201 


ECN 


202 



Speech 

English Composition 

Technical Writing 

Intermediate Algebra 

Life/Physical Sciences/Math Elective 

Humanities 

Social Sciences Elective 



Accounting Principles I 
Accounting Principles II 
Introduction to Business 
Business Law 
Business Statistics 
Introduction to Microcomputers 
Information Systems Fundamentals 
Principles of Macroeconomics 
Principles of Microeconomics 



36 credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3-6 

9-12 

9-12 

27 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



20 



Computer Information Systems 



Specialties: 

Network (Windows 2000) 
PC Support and Administration 
Programmer Analyst 
Web Management 



The Computer Information Systems curriculum, with specialties in programmer analyst, PC support 
and administration, and networking is designed to provide the flexible and comprehensive training 
required by information technology employers. The curriculum includes technical courses in comput- 
er information systems and related areas, general education and regionally determined technical 
courses in each specialty area. 



fid 



Network Specialty 

The rapid development and implementation of communications and networking technology have been 
major factors in the evolution of connectivity both in the United States and around the world. The 
ability to connect a personal computer into another system of computers and peripherals requires the 
skill of a highly qualified network specialist. The Network Specialty in the Computer Information 
Systems Technology program is designed to prepare the student for many of the challenging job 
opportunities in this technical field. Emphasis is on how "computer networks" are designed, installed 
and maintained. The Computer Information Systems Technology Program is a Microsoft-Authorized 
Training Partner. By successfully completing selective network specialty courses, students will have 
demonstrated that they have a solid understanding of network technology and may become candidates 
for professional certification exams either in Microsoft Windows 2000 MCSA, A+ and Network + 

programs. _ 

O 

03 



3 



21 



PC Support and Administration Specialty 

The curriculum is designed to prepare the graduate for employment as a PC systems administrator or 
help desk technician in a small- to medium-sized organization. Personal computer technicians should 
be able to handle a variety of jobs related to the personal computer in a business, government or serv- 
ice organization. The trained technician should be able to successfully solve problems associated with 
the installation and use of applications and operations systems software as well as installing micro- 
computer hardware components and diagnosing hardware problems. The study of business on the 
Internet is a component of this curriculum. Microcomputer applications, Windows 98 operating sys- 
tem, hardware/software troubleshooting and Internet web page design are some of the specific cours- 
es in this program. Data communications, systems analysis and design, local area networks and rela- 
tional database are also included in the PC Support and Administration curriculum. 

Programmer Analyst Specialty 

The programmer analyst curriculum is designed to prepare the graduate to be a business applications 
computer programmer. Applications programmers convert a design for a computer system into 
instructions for the computer. They are responsible for testing, debugging, documenting and imple- 
menting programs. Applications programmers in business generally have at least a two-year degree. 

Web Design Specialty 

This specialty prepares the graduate with the skills to design web sites, including the use of graphics, 
forms and database connectivity. The curriculum also provides familiarity with HTML, Microsoft 
Frontpage, Macromedia Dreamweaver and basic website support such as a security and system man- 
agement. Current application trends, E-Commerce and E-Business, the Internet, Intranets and 
Extranets are explored. The specialty can lead to positions such as web developer, web designer or 
web master. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 60 credits 



22 



Associate of Applied Science 
Network Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 

18 credits 

Speech 3 

Elements of Economics 3 

English Composition I 3 
Functional Mathematics OR 

Intermediate Algebra 3 

Physical Science 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 

18 credits 

Accounting Principles I 3 

Introduction to Business 3 

Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

Information Systems Fundamentals 3 

Microcomputer Operating Systems 3 

Systems Analysis and Design 3 

Specialty Core - Windows 2000 Option 12 credits 

CIS 202 Data Communications 3 

CIS 262 Client Operation Systems 3 

CIS 263 Windows Network Operating Systems 3 

CIS 265 Managing a Windows Network 3 



General Education Core 


HSS 


143 


AEC 


100 


HEW 


101 


MAT 


112 


MAT 


111 


SPS 


101 


ASO 


151 


Technical Core 




ACC 


101 


BUS 


101 


CIS 


101 


CIS 


102 


^CIS 


106 


A CIS 


203 



o 
a 

CD 

3 
o 



Regionally Determined Core (Windows 2000 Option) 

CIS 240 A+ Certification I 

CIS 241 A+ Certification II 

CIS 235 Network Fundamentals 

CIS xxx Elective 



12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



■o 



Electives -Networking (Windows 2000 option) 



CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
ELT 



288 
288 
288 
266 
113 
232 
116 
201 
252 
104 
124 



Win2000 AD Design 3 

Win2000 Security Design 3 

Win2000 Infrastructure Design 3 
Win2000 Hardware Service and Support 3 

Logic, Design and Programming 3 

Visual Basic Programming 3 

Intro to Java Programming 3 

Database Design and Management 3 

Web Page Design 3 

Cobol Programming Fundamentals 3 

Digital Electronics 3 



A Capstone Course (Course that summarizes previous course experience.) 

AA Students must earn a "B" or higher in CIS 106 to be eligible to enroll in and networking courses. 



a* 

3 



23 



Associate of Applied Science 



Programmer Analyst Specialty 



To receive this degree,you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 

AEC 100 

HEW 101 

MAT 112 

MAT 111 

SPS 101 

ASO 151 



Speech 

Elements of Economics 
English Composition I 
Functional Mathematics OR 
Intermediate Algebra 
Physical Science 
Principles of Sociology 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



Technical Core 

ACC 101 

BUS 101 

CIS 101 

CIS 102 

CIS 106 

CIS 203 



Accounting Principles I 
Introduction to Business 
Introduction to Microcomputers 
Information Systems Fundamentals 
Microcomputer Operating Systems 
Systems Analysis and Design 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Specialty Core 

CIS 113 

CIS 207 

CIS xxx 

CIS xxx 



Logic, Design and Programming 

Micro Database Design and Mgmt. Sys. 

Introduction to (Language) 

Programming 

Advanced (Language) Programming 



12 credits 

3 
3 

3 
3 



Regionally Determined Core 

CIS 232 

CIS 202 

CIS xxx 

CIS xxx 



Visual Basic 

Data Communications 

CIS Elective 

CIS Elective 



12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



Elecrives 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 

CIS 



104 
116 
204 
205 
211 
212 
216 
221 
224 
232 
236 
237 
252 
235 



Cobol Programming Fundamentals 3 

Introduction to Java Programming 3 

Advanced Cobol Programming 3 

Database Design w/Oracle 3 

RPG/400 Programming 3 

C++ Programming 3 

Advanced RPG/400 Programming 3 

Advanced C++ Programming 3 

Hardware/Software Troubleshooting 3 

Visual Basic Programming 3 

Advanced Visual Basic Programming 3 

Advanced Java Programming 3 

Web Page Design 3 

Network Fundamentals 3 



24 



Associate of Applied Science 



PC Support and Administration Specialty 



General Educa 


Hon Core 




18 credits 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


AEC 


100 


Elements of Economics 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


112 


Functional Mathematics OR 




MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


SPS 


101 


Physical Science 


3 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 


3 


Technical Core 






18 credits 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CIS 


102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 


3 


CIS 


106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 


A CIS 


203 


Systems Analysis and Design 


3 


Specialty Core 






12 credits 


CIS 


202 


Data Communications 


3 


CIS 


224 


Hardware/Software Troubleshooting 


3 


CIS 


251 


Advanced Operating Systems 


3 


CIS 


252 


Website Development 


3 


Regionally Determined Core 




12 credits 


CIS 


201 


Database Design and Management 


3 


CIS 


235 


Network Fundamentals 


3 


CIS 


XXX 


Elective 


3 


CIS 


XXX 


Elective 


3 


Electives 

CIS 


113 


Logic Design and Programming 


3 


CIS 


232 


Visual Basic Programming 


3 


CIS 


116 


Introduction to Java Programming 


3 


CIS 


205 


Database Design w/Oracle 


3 


CIS 


104 


Cobol Programming Fund 


3 


CIS 


211 


RPG/400 Programming 


3 


CIS 


252 


Web Design 


3 


OAD 


218 


Electronic Spreadsheets 


3 


ELT 


124 


Digital Electronics 


3 



A Capstone Course (Course that summarizes previous course experience.) 



o 
a. 

sisi| 
awe. 

O 



CO 

&) 

3 



25 



Associate of Applied Science 



Web Management Specialty 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 

AEC 100 

HEW 101 

MAT 112 

MAT 111 

SPS 101 

ASO 151 



Speech 

Elements of Economics 
English Composition I 
Functional Mathematics OR 
Intermediate Algebra 
Physical Science 
Principles of Sociology 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



Technical Core 

ACC 101 

BUS 101 

CIS 101 

CIS 102 

CIS 106 

A CIS 203 



Accounting Principles I 
Introduction to Business 
Introduction to Microcomputers 
Information Systems Fundamentals 
Microcomputer Operating Systems 
Systems Analysis and Design 



18 credits 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



Specialty 


Core 


CIS 


201 


CIS 


252 


CIS 


257 


CIS 


259 


Regional! 


v Determined Core 


CIS 


202 


CIS 


251 


CIS 


XXX 


CIS 


XXX 


Electives 




CIS 


113 


CIS 


116 


CIS 


212 


CIS 


224 


CIS 


232 


CIS 


235 


CIS 


236 


CIS 


237 


CIS 


102 


CIS 


240 



12 credits 

Database Design and Management 3 

Website Development 3 

Advanced Web Site Development 3 

Web Administration 3 

12 credits 

Data Communications 3 

Advanced Operating System 3 

Visual Basic or Java Programming 3 

Elective 3 



Logic Design and Programming 3 

Introduction to Java Programming 3 

C++ Programming 3 

Hardware/Software Troubleshooting 3 

Visual Basic Programming 3 

Network Fundamentals 3 

Advanced Visual Basic Programming 3 

Advanced Java Programming 3 

Information Systems Fundamentals 3 

A+ Certification I 3 



A Capstone Course (Course that summarizes previous course experience.) 



26 



Electtves for Specialty Cores 

X=May be selected for that specialty 





& 


/ 


/ 


T 




£ 


&? 


£ 


i 


£ 











CIS 109 UNIX Operating Systems 


x" 




X 




T" 




X 




CIS 113 Logic, Design and Programming 


- 




X 




X 








CIS 114 Principles of Management Information Systems 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 116 Introduction to Java Programming 


X 




X 




X 




X 




CIS 120 Programming I - COBOL 


- 




X 




- 




X 




CIS 206 Project Development with High Level Tools 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 207 Microcomputer Database Management Systems 


X 




- 




- 




X 




CIS 209 Computer Business Applications 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 211 RPG/400 Programming 


X 




- 




- 








CIS 212 C++ Programming 


X 




X 




X 




X 




CIS 213 Assembler Language Programming 


X 




- 




- 








CIS 215 Field Study 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 216 Advanced RPG/400 Programming 


X 




- 




- 








CIS 221 Advanced C++ Programming 


X 




X 




X 








CIS 223 Integrated Business Software 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 225 Advanced Database Management Systems 


X 




X 




- 




X 




CIS 227 Topics in Information Management 


X 




X 




X 








CIS 228 Cooperative Education 


X 




X 




X 








CIS 23 1 Structured Query Language 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 232 Visual BASIC 


- 




X 




X 




X 




CIS 233 Graphic User Interfaces: Windows 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 235 Network Fundamentals 


X 




X 




X 




X 




CIS 251 Advanced Operating Systems 


X 




- 




X 




X 




CIS 252 Web Site Development 


- 




X 




X 








CIS 253 Graphic Image Lab 


X 




X 




- 




X 




CIS 255 Network Operating Systems 


X 




X 




X 








CIS 256 LAN/Data Communications 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 258 Network Communications and Connectivity 


X 




X 




- 








CIS 280 CO-OP/Internship 


X 




X 




X 




X 




CIS 288 Special Topics In Computer Information Systems 


X 




X 




X 








CIS 292 Advanced Visual Basic 


X 




" 




" 









o 

flu 

- 



C8 



27 



Criminal Justice 



Specialties: 

Law Enforcement 
Youth Services 
Corrections 

The Criminal Justice program addresses educational needs for professionals in a wide variety of both 
public and private criminal justice facilities and service providers. Students will acquire an in-depth 
understanding of the various psychological, social and environmental needs of clients served by these 
facilities. Program objectives include training the entry-level professional and providing education and 
training to upgrade the skills and knowledge of those currently employed in the field. The Criminal 
Justice graduate will be a competent, entry-level provider of services in such employment settings as 
law enforcement, adult and juvenile correctional facilities, community correctional programs, child 
advocacy, juvenile agencies, victim advocacy, protective services and other human service agencies. 
Students who choose to continue their education will also have a solid academic foundation upon 
which to pursue a baccalaureate degree. 

The associate-degree curriculum provides a minimum of two years for the student to acquire and 
demonstrate the academic knowledge and the emotional and personal maturity essential in the field. 
The academic knowledge will prepare graduates to work as police officers, correctional officers, case 
workers, victim advocates, child advocates, youth counselors, substance abuse counselors, court- 
appointed special advocates, and human services agency counselors in a variety of settings. With 
experience and additional education, graduates may qualify for promotion to supervisory positions. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science - 63 credits 
Associate of Applied Science - 64 credits 



28 



Associate of Science 

For transfer to Indiana State University's Bachelor of Science in Criminology program. 
To receive this degree, you must earn 64 credits. 



General Education Core 


27 credits 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


HEW 


102 


English Composition II 


3 


MAT 


XXX 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


APO 


111 


American National Government 


3 


APS 


142 


General Psychology 


3 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Life/Physical Science Elective 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Social Science/Humanities Elective 


3 


Technical Core 






37 credits 


CRJ 


101 


Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 


3 


CRJ 


103 


Cultural Awareness 


3 


CRJ 


105 


Introduction to Criminology 


3 


CRJ 


113 


Criminal Investigations 


3 


CRJ 


115 


Criminalistics 


3 


CRJ 


123 


Juvenile Justice Systems 


3 


CRJ 


202 


Adjudication 


3 


CRJ 


203 


Policing and Community Relations 


3 


CRJ 


280 


Internship 


4 


HMS 


105 


Introduction to Correctional 








Rehabilitation Services 


3 


HMS 


113 


Substance Abuse 


3 


LEG 


211 


Criminal Law 


3 



o 

■Id 



as 



29 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 64 credits. 



General Education Core 



HSS 




143 


HEW 




101 


MAT 
APO 
APS 
ASO 

XXX 




XXX 

111 

142 
151 

XXX 


Technical Core 




CRJ 




101 


CRJ 




103 


CRJ 

HMS 
HMS 
LEG 




105 
103 

113 
211 


Specialty Cores 




Law Enforcement 


CRJ 




111 


CRJ 




113 


CRJ 




115 


CRJ 




118 


CRJ 




202 


CRJ 




203 


CRJ 




205 


CRJ 
Youth 


Services 


280 


CHD 




209 


CRJ 




121 


CRJ 




123 


CRJ 




202 


CRJ 




222 


CRJ 




280 


HMS 




205 


HMS 




215 



Corrections 

CRJ 131 

CRJ 133 

CRJ 202 

CRJ 223 



CRJ 
HMS 
HMS 
HMS 



280 
105 
204 
205 



Speech 

English Composition I 
Mathematics Elective 
American National Government 
General Psychology 
Principles of Sociology 
Life/Physical Science Elective 



Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 
Cultural Awareness 
Introduction to Criminology 
Interviewing and Assessment 
Substance Abuse 
Criminal Law 



Introduction to Traffic Control 

Criminal Investigations 

Criminalistics 

Introduction to Law Enforcement 

Adjudication 

Police and Community Relations 

Procedural Criminal Law 

Internship 

Families in Transition 

Juvenile Law and Procedures 

Juvenile Justice Systems 

Adjudication 

Special Issues in Youth Services 

Internship 

Behavior/Reality Techniques 

Juvenile Delinquency 

Community-Based Corrections 

Legal Issues in Corrections 

Adjudication 

Special Issues in Corrections 

(Classification and Treatment of Inmates) 

Internship 

Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation Services 

Rehabilitation Processes: Probation and Parole 

Behavior/Reality Techniques 



21 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

25 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 

25 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 

25 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



30 



Design Technology 



Specialties: 

Architecture 

CAD/CAM 

Civil 

Computer Graphics 

Mechanical 

The Design Technology Program is competency-based and is designed to be responsive to the needs of 
business and industry. The program provides an environment conducive to the development of general 
knowledge, technical skills and critical thinking skills so graduates may enter their profession as entry- 
level technicians. They will also be prepared to respond to future advances and changes in their pro- 
fession. Included is a foundation in engineering and design principles blended with the latest hardware 
and software used in industry today. This balance of skills in both areas provides students with the 
diversity necessary to be competitive in the job market. Graduates will have the necessary skills to 
choose related careers or continue their education at other postsecondary institutions. 



3 



Technical and career development certificates also are available. 



o 



tl 



The Indianapolis program offers various Associate of Science Degrees depending on the Articulating 
Institution. 

• The college is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Universities. 

• All specialties are accredited by the National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) . 

• The Architectural and Mechanical Specialties are accredited at the design level by the 
American Design and Drafting Association. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science - 64-67 credits 

Associate of Applied Science - 64 credits «qi 

Technical Certificate - 33 credits 

m 

Average Salary 

$30,300 53 



31 



Associate of Science 



For transfer to Indiana State University in Industrial and Mechanical Technology or Industrial Supervision. 
To receive this degree, you must earn 67 credits. 



General 

HSS 

HEW 

MAT 

MAT 

SIP 

HEW 

APS 

AEC 

ASO 

Affl 



Education Core 

143 
101 
131 
132 
101 
108 
142 
202 
151 
139 



Speech 

English Composition I 
Algebra/Trigonometry I 
Algebra/Trigonometry II 
Physics I 
Technical Writing 
General Psychology 
Macroeconomics 
Principles of Sociology 
American History I 



31 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Technical Core 

VIS 

DSN 

TEC 

TEC 

DCT 

DSN 

DSN 

DSN 

DSN 

XXX 
XXX 

IDS 



209 
103 
102 

104 
113 
106 
220 

221 

222 

XXX 
XXX 

104 



36 credits 

3D Rendering and Animation 3 

CAD Fundamentals 3 

Technical Graphics 3 
Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

Intermediate CAD 3 

Descriptive Geometry 3 

Advanced CAD 3 

Statics 3 

Strength of Materials 3 

Technical Elective 3 

Technical Elective 3 

Fluid Power 3 



Any Design Technology course qualifies as a technical elective. 



32 



Associate of Science 



For transfer to IUPUI in Computer Graphics Technology - Manufacturing Graphics Communication option. 
To receive this degree, you must earn 64 credits. 



General Education Core 



HSS 

HEW 

MAT 

MAT 

SIP 

HPP 

APS 

HAH 

ASO 

Technical Core 

ART 

ART 

ART 

DSN 

DSN 

TEC 

TEC 

TEC 

DCT 

VIS 

VIS 

VIS 



143 

101 

131 

132 

101 

2128 

142 

110 

151 



111 
115 
116 
103 
220 
101 
102 
104 
113 
101 
102 
209 



Speech 

English Composition I 
Algebra/Trigonometry I 
Algebra/Trigonometry II 
Physics I 

Introduction to Ethics 
General Psychology 
Art Appreciation 
Principles of Sociology 



Drawing for Visualization 

Typography 

Electronic Illustration 

CAD Fundamentals 

Advanced CAD 

Manufacturing Processes 

Technical Graphics 

Computer Fundamentals for Technology 

Intermediate CAD 

Fundamentals of Design 

Fundamentals of Imaging 

3D Rendering and Animation 



28 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 

36 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



o 

CO 

53 



SO 



33 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 64 credits. 



General Ed 


lucation Core 






19 credits 


HSS 


143 


Speech 




3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 




3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 




3 


MAT 


121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 




3 


SIP 


101 


Physics I 




4 


XXX 


XXX 


Elective 




3 


Technical Core 






18 credits 


DSN 


103 


CAD Fundamentals 




3 


DSN 


106 


Descriptive Geometry 




3 


DSN 


220 


Advanced CAD 




3 


DSN 


221 


Statics 




3 


TEC 


102 


Technical Graphics 




3 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


Choose one 


of the following specialties: 






Architectural Specialty and Determined Core 




27 credits 


DCT 


105 


Architectural Design & Layout 


3 


DCT 


109 


Construction Materials and 


Specifications 


3 


DCT 


204 


Architectural CAD 




3 


DCT 


208 


Structural Design and Detailing 


3 


DCT 


113 


Intermediate CAD 




3 


DCT 


206 


Mechanical and Electrical 


Equipment 


3 


DCT 


210 


Surveying 




3 


DCT 


209 


Estimating 




3 


DSN 


222 


Strength of Materials 




3 


CAD/CAM 


Specialty and Determined Core 




27 credits 


DCT 


113 


Intermediate CAD 




3 


DSN 


222 


Strength of Materials 




3 


MTT 


102 


Turning Processes 




3 


MTT 


103 


Milling Processes 




3 


MTT 


208 


CNC Programming 




3 


MTT 


209 


CNC Programming II 




3 


MTT 


220 


CAD/CAM I 




3 


MTT 


221 


CAD/CAM II 




3 


TEC 


101 


Manufacturing Processes 




3 



34 



Civil Specialty and Determined Core 


27 credits 


DCT 


109 


Construction Materials and Specifications 


3 


DCT 


208 


Structural Design and Detailing 


3 


DCT 


210 


Surveying 


3 


DCT 


213 


CAD Mapping 


3 


DCT 


113 


Intermediate CAD 


3 


DCT 


209 


Estimating 


3 


DCT 


228 


Civil I 


3 


DCT 


229 


Civil II 


3 


DSN 


222 


Strength of Materials 


3 


Computer 


Graphics Specialty 


and Determined Core 


27 credits 


ART 


111 


Drawing for Visualization 


3 


ART 


112 


Electronic Layout 


3 


ART 


114 


Graphic Design 


3 


ART 


116 


Electronic Dlustration 


3 


DCT 


113 


Intermediate CAD 


3 


VIS 


101 


Fundamentals of Design 


3 


VIS 


102 


Fundamentals of Imaging 


3 


VIS 


115 


Introduction to Computer Graphics 


3 


VIS 


209 


3-D Rendering and Animation 


3 


Mechanical Specialty and Determined Core 


27 credits 


DCT 


104 


Mechanical Graphics 


3 


DCT 


105 


Architectural Design and Layout 


3 


DCT 


113 


Intermediate CAD 


3 


DCT 


201 


Schematics 


3 


DCT 


216 


Jig and Fixture Design 


3 


DCT 


217 


Design Process and Application 


3 


DSN 


222 


Strength of Materials 


3 


VIS 


209 


3-D Rendering and Animation 


3 


General Education Electives (choose one) 




AEC 


101 


Elements of Economics 


3 


AEC 


202 


Macroeconomics 


3 


AEC 


201 


Microeconomics 


3 


ETH 


101 


Ethics 


3 


HPP 


211 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


APO 


111 


American National Government 


3 


APS 


142 


General Psychology 


3 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 


3 



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35 



Technical Certificate 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 33 credits. 



General Education Core 

HEW 101 

MAT 111 



English Composition I 
Intermediate Algebra 



6 credits 

3 
3 



Technical Core 

TEC 104 

Specialty Core 

DSN 103 

TEC 102 



Computer Fundamentals for Technology 



CAD Fundamentals 
Technical Graphics 



3 credits 

3 

6 credits 

3 

3 



Regionally Determined Core 

DCT 104 

DCT 105 

DCT 113 

DSN 106 

XXX XXX 



Mechanical Graphics 
Architectural Design and Layout 
Intermediate CAD 
Descriptive Geometry 
Humanities/Social Sciences 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Students should select one course from the following: 

DCT 109 Construction Materials and Specifications 3 

TEC 101 Manufacturing Processes 3 



36 



Early Childhood Education 



Specialties: 

Administrative 
Curriculum 
Generalist 
Infant/Toddler 

The Early Childhood Education Program focuses on early childhood growth and development, includ- 
ing adult-child relationships. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills and techniques for pro- 
viding appropriate environments, care and education for young children. Instruction is provided in the 
physical, emotional, social, and cognitive areas of early childhood. The training is appropriate for can- 
didates seeking the Child Development Associate (CD A) credential. The student develops competen- 
cies through classroom instruction, observation, and participation in early childhood settings. 
Employment opportunities include: child care centers, nursery school, Head Start,family child care, 
pediatric settings, nanny care, and school age child care. 

Degrees Available 

Technical Certificate - 30 credits 
Associate of Applied Science - 63 credits 

Average Salary 

$19,000 to $27,000 



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37 



Associate Science 



For transfer to Ball State University. 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 



HEW 


101 


APS 


142 


ASO 


151 


MAT 


112 


AHI 


139 


AHI 


140 


APO 


111 


SPS 


101 


SIL 


101 


HEW 


102 


HSS 


143 


Technical Core 




ECE 


120 


ECE 


130 


ECE 


101 


ECE 


103 


ECE 


102 


ECE 


260 


Specialty Core 




ECE 


201 


ECE 


204 


ECE 


210 


ECE 


230 


ECE 


233 


ECE 


235 


ECE 


255 



English Composition I 
General Psychology 
Principles of Sociology 
Functional Mathematics 
American History I OR 
American History II OR 
American National Government 
Physical Science 
Microbiology 
English 
Speech 



Child Growth and Development 

Developmentally Appropriate Guidance 

with a Cultural Context 

Beginnings in Child Development 

Curriculum in the Early Childhood 

Classroom 

Reflections on Practice 

Early Childhood Professionalism 



Skills for Parenting 

Family in Transition 

Early Childhood Administration 

Exceptional Child 

Emerging Literacy 

Preschool Age Practicum 

Generalist Practicum 



27 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 

3 

18 credits 

3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

21 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



38 



Associate Science 

For transfer to Indiana State University. 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 




27 credits 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


HEW 


102 


English Composition II OR 


3 


HEW 


108 


Technical Writing 




APS 


142 


General Psychology 


3 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 


3 


MAT 


112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


AHI 


139 


American History I 


3 


HPP 


111 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


SCI 


XXX 


Elective 


3 


Technical Core 






18 credits 


ECE 


120 


Child Growth and Development 


3 


ECE 


130 


Developmentally Appropriate Guidance 








with a Cultural Context 


3 


ECE 


101 


Beginnings in Child Development 


3 


ECE 


103 


Curriculum in the Early Childhood 








Classroom 


3 


ECE 


102 


Reflections on Practice 


3 


ECE 


260 


Early Childhood Professionalism 


3 


Specialty Core 






21 credits 


ECE 


200 


Family/Teacher Partnership Skills 


3 


ECE 


210 


Early Childhood Administration 


3 


ECE 


204 


Family in Transition 


3 


ECE 


233 


Emerging Literacy 


3 


ECE 


243 


Cognitive Curriculum 


3 


ECE 


225 


Infant/Toddler Practicum 


3 


ECE 


235 


Preschool Age Practicum 


3 









3 

mm 



39 



Associate of Applied Science 



Administrative Specialty 



To earn this degree, you must earn 63 credits. 



General Education Gore 



HEW 


101 


APS 


142 


ASO 


151 


MAT 


111 


MAT 


112 


SCI 


XXX 


HEW 


102 


HEW 


108 


HSS 


148 


Technical Core 




ECE 


120 


ECE 


130 


ECE 


101 


ECE 


103 


ECE 


102 


ECE 


260 


Administrative 


Speci 


ECE 


200 


ECE 


201 


ECE 


210 


ECE 


204 


ECE 


230 


ECE 


218 



ECE 



216 



English Composition I 
General Psychology 
Principles of Sociology 
Intermediate Algebra OR 
Functional Mathematics 
Science Elective 
English Composition II OR 
Technical Writing OR 
Interpersonal Communication 



Child Growth and Development 
Developmentally Appropriate Guidance 
with a Cultural Context 
Beginnings in Child Development 
Curriculum in the Early Childhood 
Classroom 

Reflections on Practice 
Early Childhood Professional 



Family/Teacher Partnership Skills 

Skills for Parenting 

Early Childhood Administration 

Family in Transition 

Exceptional Child 

Leadership and Mentoring in the 

Early Childhood Profession 

Curriculum in the Early Childhood 

Classroom for Ao^ministrators 



IS credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 



18 credits 

3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

27 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Must take two of the following courses: 

ECE 105 CDA Process 

ECE 255 Generalist Practicum 

ECE 225 Infant/Toddler Practicum 

ECE 235 Preschool Age Practicum 

ECE 245 School Age Practicum 



40 



Associate of Applied Science 



Curriculum Specialty 

To earn this degree, you must earn 63 credits. 



General Education Core 



HEW 


101 


APS 


142 


ASO 


151 


MAT 


111 


MAT 


112 


SCI 


XXX 


HEW 


102 


HEW 


108 


HSS 


148 


Technical Core 


ECE 


120 


ECE 


130 


ECE 


101 


ECE 


103 


ECE 


102 


ECE 


260 


Curriculum 


Specialty Core 


ECE 


233 


ECE 


243 


ECE 


216 


ECE 


223 


ECE 


213 


ECE 


200 


ECE 


204 


ECE 


210 



English Composition I 
General Psychology 
Principles of Sociology 
Intermediate Algebra OR 
Functional Mathematics 
Science Elective 
English Composition II OR 
Technical Writing OR 
Interpersonal Communication 



Must take two of the following courses: 

ECE 105 CDA Process 

ECE 255 Generalist Practicum 

ECE 225 Infant/Toddler Practicum 

ECE 235 Preschool Age Practicum 

ECE 245 School Age Practicum 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 





18 credits 


Child Growth and Development 


3 


Developmentally Appropriate Guidance 




with a Cultural Context 


3 


Beginnings in Child Development 


3 


Curriculum in the Early Childhood 




Classroom 


3 


Reflections on Practice 


3 


Early Childhood Professionalism 


3 




27 credits 


Emerging Literacy 


3 


Cognitive Curriculum 


3 


Curriculum in the Early Childhood 




Classroom for Administrators 


3 


School Age Programming OR 




Infant and Toddler Care 




and Programming 


3 


Family/Teacher Partnership 


3 


Family in Transition 


3 


Early Childhood Administration 


3 



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y 

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41 



Associate of Applied Science 

Generalist Specialty 



To earn this degree, you must earn 63 credits. 



General Education Core 



HEW 


101 


APS 


142 


ASO 


151 


MAT 


111 


MAT 


112 


SCI 


XXX 


HEW 


102 


HEW 


108 


HSS 


148 


Technical Core 




ECE 


120 


ECE 


130 


ECE 


101 


ECE 


103 


ECE 


102 


ECE 


260 



Generalist Specialty Core 

ECE 200 

ECE 201 

ECE 210 

ECE 204 

ECE 230 

ECE 233 

ECE 243 



English Composition I 
General Psychology 
Principles of Sociology 
Intermediate Algebra OR 
Functional Mathematics 
Science Elective 
English Composition II OR 
Technical Writing OR 
Interpersonal Communication 



Child Growth and Development 
Developmentally Appropriate Guidance 
with a Cultural Context 
Beginnings in Child Development 
Curriculum in the Early Childhood 
Classroom 

Reflections on Practice 
Early Childhood Professional 



Family/Teacher Partnership Skills 

Skills for Parenting 

Early Childhood Administration 

Family in Transition 

Exceptional Child 

Emerging Literacy 

Cognitive Curriculum 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 



18 credits 

3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

27 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Must take two of the following courses: 

ECE 105 CDA Process 

ECE 255 Generalist 

ECE 225 Infant/Toddler Practicum 

ECE 235 Preschool Age Practicum 

ECE 245 School Age Practicum 



42 



Associate of Applied Science 



Infant/Toddler Specialty 

To earn this degree, you must earn 63 credits. 



General Education Core 



HEW 


101 


APS 


142 


ASO 


151 


MAT 


111 


MAT 


112 


SCI 


XXX 


HEW 


102 


HEW 


108 


HSS 


148 


Technical Core 




ECE 


120 


ECE 


130 


ECE 


101 


ECE 


103 


ECE 


102 


ECE 


260 


Infant and Toddler S 


ECE 


111 


ECE 


110 


ECE 


213 


*ECE 


230 


ECE 


210 


ECE 


200 


*ECE 


233 


*ECE 


204 


*ECE 


201 



English Composition I 
General Psychology 
Principles of Sociology 
Intermediate Algebra OR 
Functional Mathematics 
Science Elective 
Englsih Composition n OR 
Technical Writing OR 
Interpersonal Communication 



Child Growth and Development 
Developmentally Appropriate Guidance 
with a Cultural Context 
Beginnings in Child Development 
Curriculum in the Early Childhood 
Classroom 

Reflections on Practice 
Early Childhood Professional 



Environments for Infants and Toddlers 
Infant/Toddler Growth and Development 
Early Childhood Programming 
Exceptional Child 
Early Childhood Administration 
Family/Teacher Partnership 
Emerging Literacy 
Families in Transition 
Skills for Parenting 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 



18 credits 

3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

27 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



* Take two of the four. 



Cm) 
&) 

_ 

© 

CO 



Must take two of the following courses: 

ECE 105 CDA Process 

ECE 255 Generalist Practicum 

ECE 225 Infant/Toddler Practicum 

ECE 235 Preschool Age Practicum 



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43 



Technical Certificate 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 30 credits. 



General Education Core 




6 credits 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


APS 


142 


General Psychology OR 


3 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 




Technical Core 






24 credits 


ECE 


120 


Child Growth and Development 


3 


ECE 


130 


Developmental and Cultural Awareness 


3 


ECE 


101 


Beginnings in Child Development 


3 


ECE 


103 


Curriculum in the Early Childhood 








Classroom 


3 


ECE 


102 


Reflections on Practice 


3 


ECE 


105 


CDA Process OR 




ECE 


XXX 


Practicum 


3 


ECE 


230 


Exceptional Child 


3 


ECE 


233 


Emerging Literacy 


3 



44 



Electronics Technology 



Biomedical Specialty 

This program provides the student with the skills necessary to install, maintain, and service medical equipment 
in hospitals or in the biomedical industry with equipment manufacturers and distributors. This equipment 
includes patient care monitoring systems, medical imaging devices, clinical laboratory equipment, therapeutic 
machine-like dialysis equipment, and respiratory therapy systems. 

Broadcasting Communications Electronics Specialty 

Students in this program learn the dynamics of installing, testing, repairing, setting up, and operating broad- 
casting equipment in radio, television, or recording studios. Students also operate equipment that regulates the 
signal, strength, clarity, and range of sound and colors of recordings or broadcasts. In addition, students may 
operate control panels and operate and maintain video, sound recording, and special effects equipment. 

Communications/Computer Specialty 

This program provides the student with electronic skills in AC/DC circuit theory, using solid state devices, dig- 
ital principles and electronic computer/communications. This two-year Associate of Applied Science degree 
program should enable a graduate to seek employment as an electronics or computer technician, electronics 
equipment installer, computer installer, network hardware technician, satellite antenna installer, microwave 
installer, and mobile radio technician. 



Industrial Electronics Specialty 

This program provides the student with electronic skills in AC/DC circuit theory, using solid state devices, dig- 
ital principles and industrial controls and systems. This two-year Associate of Applied Science program should 
enable a graduate to seek employment as an electronic industrial technician, electronic control technician, 
instrumentation technician, power monitor technician or PLC technician. 

AS 

This program provides the student with electronic skills in AC/DC circuit theory, using solid state devices, dig- 
ital principles, general technology and general education classes. This two-year Associate of Science program 
should enable a graduate to continue his degree work which would lead to a BS degree in electronic technolo- 
gy, employment as a generalist in electronic technology, electronic management and sales. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 65 credits 
Associate of Science - 64 credits 



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45 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 65 credits. 



General Education Core 


HSS 


143 


HEW 


101 


MAT 


131 


MAT 


132 


SIP 


101 


XXX 


XXX 


Technical Core 




ELT 


120 


ELT 


121 


ELT 


122 


ELT 


124 


ELT 


125 


ELT 


126 


ELT 


221 


ELT 


222 


ELT 


224 


ELT 


234 


TEC 


103 


TEC 


104 



Speech 

English Composition I 
Algebra/Trigonometry I 
Geometry/Trigonometry II 
Physics I 
Humanities/Social Sciences 

Introduction to Electronics 

Circuits I 

Circuits II 

Digital I 

Digital II 

Solid State I 

Solid State II 

Microprocessors 

Linear IC Applications 

Advanced Problem Solving 

Collaborative Team Skills 

Computer Fundamentals for Technology 



Choose one of the following specialties: 
Biomedical Specialty 

ELT 219 
ELT 220 
HHS 101 
ANP 101 



Bioelectronics I 
Bioelectronics II 
Medical Terminology 
Anatomy and Physiology 



Broadcasting Communications Electronics Specialty 

ELT 228 Communications Electronics 

ELT 230 Advanced Communications Electronics 

ELT xxx Broadcasting Internship I 

ELT xxx Broadcasting Internship II 

Communications/Computer Specialty and Core 

ELT 228 Communications Electronics 

*ELT 230 Advanced Communications Electronics 

*ELT 229 Telecommunications 

*ELT 231 Microwave 

Industrial Specialty and Core 

*AMT 201 Manufacturing Systems Control 

ELT 223 Electrical Machines 

*ELT 203 Introduction to Industrial Controls 

*ELT 214 Industrial Instrumentation 



19 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

34 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 

12 credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



* The following could be substituted for any of the the above except ELT 228 and ELT 223 



Elective Options 

ELT 226 
ELT 227 
ELT 212 
IDS 104 



Computer Troubleshooting 
Peripherals 
Networking 
Fluid Power Basics 



46 



Associate of Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 64 credits. 



General Education Core 




31 credits 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


HEW 


108 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 


131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


MAT 


132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


3 


SIP 


101 


Physics I 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences 


12 


Technical Core 






36 credits 


ELT 


120 


Introduction to Electronics 


3 


ELT 


121 


Circuits I 


3 


ELT 


122 


Circuits II 


3 


ELT 


124 


Digital I 


3 


ELT 


125 


Digital II 


3 


ELT 


126 


Solid State I 


3 


ELT 


221 


Solid State II 


3 


ELT 


222 


Microprocessors 


3 


IDS 


104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


TEC 


102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


ELT 


224 


Linear IC Applications 


3 



o 
m 

wmK 



Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) Airway Facilities Collegiate Training Initiative (AF-CTI). 

* The following could be substituted for any of the the above except ELT 228 and ELT 223 
Elective Options 

ELT 226 Computer Troubleshooting 

ELT 227 Peripherals 

ELT 212 Networking 

IDS 104 Fluid Power Basics 



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47 



General Technical Studies 



Specialties: 

General Studies 

Business 

Health and Public Services 

Technology 

The General Technical Studies Certificate Program offers students the opportunity for further educa- 
tion and career exploration. Students who earn the technical certificate and do not pursue further edu- 
cation could seek employment areas related to specific courses taken. 

Degree Available 

Technical Certificate - 30 credit 



48 



Technical Certificate 



General Studies Specialty 



Course ID 




Course Title 


30 credits 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


HSS 


143 


Speech OR 




HSS 


148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Social Science Electives 


6 


XXX 


XXX 


Science or Math Elective 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities Elective 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


General Electives 


12 



Recommended Electives: 

Science ANP 101, ANP 102, ANP 201, ANP 203, ANP 204, SCM 111, SCM 112, SES 207, 

SIL 101, SIL 211, SIP101, SIP 102, SPS 101, 

Social Science AEC 100, AEC 201, AEC 202, AHI 139, AHI 140, APO 111, APO 112, APO 201, 
APO 210, APO 211, APO 220, APS 142, APS 201, APS 249, APS 280, ASO 151, 
ASO 154, ASO 245, ASO 252, ASO 253, ASO 261, 

Math MAT 111, MAT 112, MAT 121, MAT 131, MAT 132, MAT 134, MAT 135, SMA 115 

Humanities HAH 110, HEH 110, HEH 111, HEL 220, HEL 221, HEL 222, HEL 223, 

HEL 224, HEL 225, HEL 227, HEL 232, HEL 240, HEW 102, HEW 108, HEW 202, 
HLS 100, HLS 101, HLS 103, HLS 201, HLS 203, HMM 118, HPP 111, HPP212, 
HPP 213, HPP 220, HSS 143, HSS 148 



o 



; 



Note: Students must meet prerequisite requirements of each class in order to enroll in that class. 



no 

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to 



49 



Technical Certificate 



Business Specialty 



Course ID 




Course Title 


30 credits 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra OR 




MAT 


112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


APO 


111 


American National Government OR 




APS 


142 


General Psychology 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


AEC 


100 


Elements of Economics 


3 


HSS 


143 


Speech OR 




HSS 


148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Electives 


12 



Students must meet prerequisite requirements of each class in order to enroll in that class. 



Recommended Electives: 




ACC 101 


CIS 102 


ACC 102 


HEW 102 


AHI 139 


HOS 102 


AHI 140 


HOS 114 


ANP 101 


HOS 144 


APO 111 


HPP111 


APS 142 


HPP212 


BUS 102 


HSS 143 


CIS 101* 


HSS 148 



LEG 101 

MKT 101 

OAD 103* 

OAD215 

SCM 111 

SIL101 

SPS 101 

"Requires a minimum of 

25 words per minute typing 



50 



Technical Certificate 

Health and Public Services Specialty 



Course ID 




Course Title 


30 credits 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra OR 




MAT 


112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


HHS 


101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


ANP 


101 


Anatomy and Physiology I OR 




HMS 


101 


Introduction to Human Services 


3 


ANP 


102 


Anatomy and Physiology II OR 




HMS 


102 


Helping Relationship Techniques 


3 


HSS 


143 


Speech OR 




HEW 


108 


Technical Writing OR 




HSS 


148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology OR 




APS 


142 


General Psychology 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Electives' 


9 



Students must meet prerequisite requirements of each class in order to enroll in that class. 



Recommended Electives: 



m 

■--,■ 



AHI 139 CIS 101 MEA 102 

AHI 140 HEW 102 MEA 113 

ANP 101* HEW 108 MEA 209 

ANP 102 HHS 102 MEA 210 

ANP 201 HMS 101 SCM111** 

APO 111 HMS 102 SCM 112 

APS 142 HSS 143 SIL 101 

APS 201 HSS 148 SIL 211 

APS 249 MAT 111 SPS 101 

ASO 151 MAT 112 



-1 



* Take HHS 101 before ANP 101 
** Take MAT 111 before SCM 111 






51 



Technical Certificate 
Technology Specialty 



Course ID 




Course Title 


30 credii 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


HSS 


143 


Speech OR 




HSS 


148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


TEC 


102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 


113 


Basic Electricity 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Technical Electives 


12 



Note: Students must meet prerequisite requirements of each class in order to enroll in that class 



Recommended Electives: 




AMV 100 


DSN 103 


AMV202 


DSN 106 


AST 201 


HEA101 


CIS 101 


HEA103 


CIS 102 


HEA202 


DCT104 


IDS 102 


DCT 105 


IDS 107 


DCT 109 


IDS 114 


DCT 113 


MTT102 


DCT 228 


MTT103 



MTT 204 
TEC 101 
WLD 108 
WLD 109 
WLD 110 



52 



Hospitality Administration 



Specialties: 

Baking and Pastry 
Culinary Arts 
Convention Management 
Hotel Management 
Restaurant Management 

The Hospitality Administration program emphasizes the techniques of such hospitality leaders as Ritz, 
Escoffier, Statler, Hilton, and Marriott. By choosing a specialty area, students begin building technical 
skills for the profession of welcoming and serving guests. The hospitality programs offered by Ivy 
Tech produce graduates who can perform well in the hospitality industry. 

A two-year program requiring 66 credits leads to an Associate of Applied Science degree. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 66 credits 
Career Certificate - 25 credits 

Average Salary 

$24,000 Salary potential increases with experience. 



to 



fid 



CA 



53 



Associate of Applied Science 
Baking and Pastry Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 

HEW 101 

HSS 143 

HSS 148 

MAT 111 



English Composition I 
Speech OR 

Interpersonal Communications 
Intermediate Algebra OR 



18 credits 

3 



MAT 

XXX 


112 
xxx 


Functional Mathematics 
Social Science 


3 
3 


XXX 

xxx 


xxx 
xxx 


Physical Science 
Humanities Elective 


3 
3 


Technical Core 

HOS 


101 


Sanitation and First Aid 


18 credits 

3 


HOS 
HOS 


102 
104 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 
Nutrition 


3 
3 


HOS 
HOS 
HOS 
HOS 


109 
201 
203 
204 


Hospitality Purchasing 
Human Relations Management 
Menu, Design and Layout 
Food and Beverage Cost Control 


2 
3 
2 
2 


Baking and Pastry Specialty Core 

HOS 105 Introduction to Baking 
HOS 106 Pantry and Breakfast 
HOS 111 Yeast Breads I 


30 credits 

3 
3 
3 


HOS 


112 


Yeast Breads II 


3 


HOS 
HOS 
HOS 
HOS 


113 
208 
209 

213 


Baking Science 
Cakes, Icings and Fillings 
Advanced Decorating and Candies 
Classical Pastries 


3 
3 
3 
3 


HOS 
HOS 


270 
280 


Merchandising/Internship 
Co-op/Internship/Externship/Practicum 


3 
3 



54 



Associate of Applied Science 



Culinary Arts Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 

HEW 101 

HSS 143 

HSS 148 

MAT 111 

MAT 112 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 

Technical Core 

HOS 101 

HOS 102 

HOS 104 

HOS 109 

HOS 201 

HOS 203 

HOS 204 

Culinary Arts Specialty Core 



CIS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 



101 
103 
105 
106 
108 
110 
202 
207 
210 
212 
280 



English Composition I 
Speech OR 

Interpersonal Communications 
Intermediate Algebra OR 



18 credits 

3 



Functional Mathematics 


3 


Social Science Elective 


3 


Physical Science Elective 


3 


Humanities Elective 


3 




18 credits 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


3 


Nutrition 


3 


Hospitality Purchasing 


2 


Human Relations Management 


3 


Menu, Design and Layout 


2 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 


2 




30 credits 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


Soups, Stocks and Sauces 


2 


Introduction to Baking 


3 


Pantry and Breakfast 


3 


Table Service 


3 


Meat Cutting 


2 


Fish and Seafood 


2 


Advanced Baking and Chocolates 


3 


Classical Cuisines 


3 


Garde Manger 


3 


Co-op/Intemship/Externship/Practicum 


3 



o 
a. 

CO 

3 

o 



o 



Si 



55 



Associate of Applied Science 



Convention Management Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 

HEW 101 

HSS 143 

HSS 148 

MAT 111 

MAT 112 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 

Technical Core 

HOS 101 

HOS 102 

HOS 104 

HOS 109 

HOS 201 

HOS 203 

HOS 204 



Convention Management Specialty Core 



English Composition I 
Speech OR 

Interpersonal Communications 
Intermediate Algebra OR 



18 credits 

3 



ACC 


101 


BUS 


105 


CIS 


101 


HOS 


114 


HOS 


144 


HOS 


150 


HOS 


151 


HOS 


152 


HOS 


153 


MKT 


101 


Substitutions 




HLS 


101 


HRM 


202 


HOS 


280 



Functional Mathematics 


3 


Social Science Elective 


3 


Physical Science Elective 


3 


Humanities Elective 


3 




18 credits 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


3 
3 


JN UtfltlOD 

Hospitality Purchasing 


2 


Human Relations Management 


3 


Menu, Design and Layout 


2 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 


2 


ry Core 


30 credits 


Accounting Principles I 


3 


Principles of Management 


3 


Intro to Microcomputers 


3 


Intro to Hospitality 


3 


Travel Management 


3 


The Tourism System 


3 


Intro to Conventions/Meeting Mgnt. 


3 


Mechanics of Meeting Planning 


3 


Development & Mgnt. of Attractions 


3 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


Spanish I 


3 


Front Office 


3 


Internship 


3 



56 



Associate of Applied Science 



Hotel Management Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 

HEW 101 

HSS 143 

HSS 148 

MAT 111 

MAT 112 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 

Technical Core 

HOS 101 

HOS 102 

HOS 104 

HOS 109 

HOS 201 

HOS 203 

HOS 204 

Hotel Management Specialty Core 



English Composition I 
Speech OR 

Interpersonal Communications 
Intermediate Algebra OR 



18 credits 

3 



ACC 

BUS 

CIS 

HOS 

HOS 

HOS 

BUS 

MKT 

HOS 

BUS 

HOS 

HOS 



101 
102 
101 
108 
280 
144 
105 
101 
114 
101 
215 
217 



Functional Mathematics 


3 


Social Science Elective 


3 


Physical Science Elective 


3 


Humanities Elective 


3 




18 credits 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


3 


Nutrition 


3 


Hospitality Purchasing 


2 


Human Relations Management 




Menu, Design and Layout 


2 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 


2 


e 


30 credits 


Accounting Principles I 


3 


Business Law 


3 


Intro to Microcomputers 


3 


Table Service 


3 


Internship/Externship/Practicum 


3 


Intro to Hospitality OR 




Principles of Management 


3 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


Travel Management OR 




Introduction to Business 


3 


Front Office 


3 


Housekeeping 


3 



■ 

o 
&) 

a. 
cd 



ca 



3 



57 



Associate of Applied Science 
Restaurant Management Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 

HEW 101 

HSS 143 

HSS 148 

MAT 111 

MAT 112 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 

XXX XXX 



English Composition I 
Speech OR 

Interpersonal Communications 
Intermediate Algebra OR 
Functional Mathematics 
Social Science Elective 
Physical Science Elective 
Humanities Elective 



18 credits 

3 



Technical Core 




HOS 


101 


HOS 


102 


HOS 


104 


HOS 


109 


HOS 


201 


HOS 


203 


HOS 


204 


Restaurant Mai 


nageri 


ACC 


101 


CIS 


101 


HOS 


108 


HOS 


144 


BUS 


105 


BUS 


102 


MKT 


101 


HOS 


114 


BUS 


101 


HOS 


280 


BUS 


208 


BUS 


210 


MKT 


104 



Sanitation and First Aid 

Basic Food Theory and Skills 

Nutrition 

Hospitality Purchasing 

Human Relations Management 

Menu, Design and Layout 

Food and Beverage Cost Control 



Accounting Principles I 
Intro to Microcomputers 
Table Service 
Intro to Hospitality OR 
Principles of Management 
Business Law 
Principles of Marketing 
Travel Management OR 
Introduction to Business 
Internship/Extemship/Practicum 
Organizational Behavior 
Managerial Finance OR 
Advertising 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

2 
3 
2 
2 



30 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



58 



Human Services 



Specialties: 

Generalist 
Mental Health 
Substance Abuse 

The Human Services Program offers students the opportunity to become Human Services Generalists 
or to concentrate in the areas of Substance Abuse or Mental Health. 

As a Human Services professional, graduates reach out to individuals, families, and communities. Job 
positions might include case worker, advocate, intake worker, counselor technician, residential worker, 
social service trainer, skills trainer, or community living specialist. 

Those who study Human Services with a focus on Substance Abuse may find a position in substance 
abuse centers (residential, detoxification centers, and hospitals) as counselors or residents-m-training. 
The program is certified by the Indiana Counselors Association on Alcohol & Drug Abuse (ICAA- 
DA). Those who focus in the area of Mental Health may find employment in group homes and com- 
munity mental health centers. 



cs 



The program's objectives include preparing the entry-level worker, providing education and training to 
upgrade the skills and knowledge of those currently employed, and providing development and 
enhancement of skills. 

The Associate of Science degree requires 65 credits. Students will take the required General 
Education, Technical Core, Regionally Determined Courses plus either the Generalist, Mental Health, 
or Substance Abuse Specialty courses to earn their Associate of Science degree. 

t 
Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 62 credits „_ 

Associate of Science - 65 credits 

m 

3 

Cfl 



59 



Associate of Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 65 credits. 



General Education Core 



SIL 

SPS 

HSS 

HEW 

MAT 

MAT 

APO 

APS 

ASO 



101 
101 
143 
101 
112 
111 
111 
142 
151 



Introductory Biology OR 
Physical Science 
Speech 

English Composition I 
Functional Mathematics OR 
Intermediate Algebra 
American National Government 
General Psychology 
Principles of Sociology 



English or Humanities Elective (choose one) 

HEW 108 Technical Writing 

HUM 101 Survey of Humanities 

HPP 111 Introduction to Philosophy 

Technical Core 

HMS 101 

HMS 102 

HMS 103 

HMS 205 

HMS 206 



Introduction to Human Services 
Helping Relationship Techniques 
Interviewing and Assessment 
Behavior/Reality Techniques 
Group Process and Skills 



Regionally Determined Courses - Internship and Seminars 

HMS 201 Internship I 

HMS 202 Internship II 

HMS xxx Human Service Elective 

HMS xxx Human Service Elective 

Choose one of the following specialties: 



Introduction to Microcomputers 
Developmental Psychology 
Human Service Elective 
Human Service Elective 



Crisis Intervention 

Issues and Ethics in Human Services OR 

Problems of Substance Abuse OR 

Loss and Grief 

Developmental Psychology 

Abnormal Psychology 

Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 
Treatment Models in Substance Abuse 
Counseling Issues in Substance Abuse 
Issues in Substance Abuse in Family Systems 



Generalist 


Specialty 


CIS 


101 


APS 


201 


HMS 


xxx 


HMS 


xxx 


Mental Health Specialty 


HMS 


104 


HMS 


220 


HMS 


113 


HMS 


140 


APS 


201 


APS 


249 



Substance Abuse Specialty 

HMS 113 

HMS 208 

HMS 209 

HMS 210 



24 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

14 credits 

4 
4 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 



3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



60 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 62 credits. 



General Education Core 



Introductory Biology OR 
Physical Science 
Speech 

English Composition I 
Functional Mathematics OR 
Intermediate Algebra 
American National Government 
General Psychology OR 
Principles of Sociology 



Introduction to Human Services 
Helping Relationship Techniques 
Interviewing and Assessment 
Behavior/Reality Techniques 
Group Process and Skills 
Program Planning/Policy Issues 



Regionally Determined Courses - Internship and Seminars 

HMS 201 Internship I 

HMS 202 Internship H 

HMS xxx Human Service Elective 

HMS xxx Human Service Elective 

Choose one of the following specialties: 



SIL 


101 


SPS 


101 


HSS 


143 


HEW 


101 


MAT 


112 


MAT 


111 


APO 


111 


APS 


142 


ASO 


151 


Technical Core 




HMS 


101 


HMS 


102 


HMS 


103 


HMS 


205 


HMS 


206 


HMS 


207 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

14 credits 

4 
4 
3 
3 



Generalist Specialty 




12 credits 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


APS 201 


Developmental Psychology 


3 


HMS xxx 


Elective 


3 


HMS xxx 


Elective 


3 


Mental Health Specialty 




12 credits 


HMS 104 


Crisis Intervention 


3 


HMS 220 


Issues and Ethics in Human Services OR 




HMS 113 


Problems of Substance Abuse OR 




HMS 140 


Loss and Grief 


3 


APS 201 


Developmental Psychology 


3 


APS 249 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 


Substance Abuse Specialty 




12 credits 


HMS 113 


Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 


3 


HMS 208 


Treatment Models in Substance Abuse 


3 


HMS 209 


Counseling Issues in Substance Abuse 


3 


HMS 210 


Issues of Substance Abuse in Family Systems 


3 



35" 

o 

as 

CD 

O 



ft) 

3 



61 



Associate of Science 

For transfer to Indiana State University in Community Health. 
To receive this degree, you must earn 65 credits. 



General Education Core 




27 credits 


sil 


101 


Introductory Biology 


3 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


HEW 


108 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


APO 


111 


American National Government 


3 


APS 


142 


General Psychology 


3 


APS 


201 


Developmental Psychology 


3 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 


3 


Technical Core 






38 credits 


CHD 


123 


Health, Safety and Nutrition OR 




CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


HMS 


101 


Introduction to Human Services 


3 


HMS 


102 


Helping Relationship Techniques 


3 


HMS 


103 


Interviewing and Assessment 


3 


HMS 


104 


Crisis Intervention 


3 


HMS 


201 


Internship I 


4 


HMS 


202 


Internship II 


4 


HMS 


205 


Behavior/Reality Techniques 


3 


HMS 


206 


Group Process and Skills 


3 


HMS 


207 


Program Planning/Policy Issues 


3 


HMS 


XXX 


Human Service Elective 


3 


HMS 


XXX 


Human Service Elective 


3 



62 



Liberal Arts 



Specialties: 

English 
History 
Liberal Arts 
Philosophy 
Political Science 
Pre-Law 
Psychology 
Sociology 

CD 

Graduates who communicate well, adapt to social and economic change, function as team players, ana- 
lyze issues, and solve problems are vital in today's workforce. Employers value individuals who under- 
stand the importance of lifelong learning, whether it's on the job or in the classroom. A Liberal Arts 
education helps develop these qualities. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Arts (This degree is from Vincennes University.) 
Associate of Science (This degree is from Vincennes University.) 



s 



Q 

SO 

3 



63 



Associate of Arts and Associate of Science 

These degrees and concentrations will provide opportunities for students at the Community College of 
Indiana (CCI) sites to pursue transfer education opportunities. These programs have long been included in 
the degree offerings of Vincennes University and now available to students through the CCI partnership. 
These degrees and concentrations are available to students who wish to enroll through the CCI partnership 
and later transfer to pursue a baccalaureate degree at a four-year college or university. 

Credit Hours - AS. A.A. 
General Education Requirements 

Basic Skills Core 9 9 
HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW 112 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra (or higher mathematics) 3 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 3 

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by major courses to be designated by your 

advisor. 

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by SMA 102 or a subsequent mathematics course or bypassing a 

mathematics assessment examination. 

Liberal Education Core 20 28 

HEW 102 English Composition n 1 3 3 

PFW 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 2 

Laboratory Science Elective - Common Core List 3 3 

Humanities Elective - Common Core List 1 3 3 

Humanities Elective - Broad Core List - 3 

Social Science Electives - Core List 6 6 

Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective - Broad Core List 3 

Foreign Language Electives - 8 

Degree Related Concentrations 

(See the following pages for specific course requirements for these concentrations.) 

English Concentration 33 25 

History Concentration 34 25 

Liberal Arts Concentration 30 24 

Philosophy Concentration - 27 

Political Science Concentration 34 28 

Pre-Law Concentration 34 28 

Psychology Concentration 34 28 

Sociology Concentration 34 28 

~62 62-65 

1 Students not qualifying for HEW 1 12 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: (1) 
HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and n, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and HEL 221 Introduction to 
World Literature I and n. If the latter option is chosen, HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities 
Common Core requirement. 



64 



English Concentration 

This curriculum offers the first two years of study for students preparing for professions in publishing 
public relations, linguistics, library science, or the teaching of English. 

Credit Hours -AS. 
General Education Requirements 
Basic Stalls Core 9 

HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW112 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra (or higher 

mathematics) 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may 
be met by HEL 225. 

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subse- 
quent mathematics course or bypassing a mathematics assess- 
ment examination. 

Liberal Education Core 20 

HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing 1 3 

PFW100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 

Laboratory Science Elective - Common Core List 3 

Humanities Elective - Common Core List 1 3 

Humanities Elective - Broad Core List 3 

AHI 139 American History 1 3 

APS 142 General Psychology 3 

Foreign Language Electives - 

The Computer Skills requirement for the AS. is met by Computers 
Across the Curriculum. For the A A., Computer Skills are enhanced 
byBDPlOI. 

Concentration Requirements 33 

ASO 151 Sociology 3 

BDP 101 Using the Windows Environment - 

HEG249 Elements of General Linguistics 3 

HEG 250 English Grammar 3 

HEL 222 American Literature 1 3 

HEL 223 American Literature H 3 

HEL 224 Survey of English Literature 1 3 

HEL 225 Survey of English Literature H 3 

HEW 202 Creative Writing -or- 

Literature Elective 3 

HSS 201 Voice and Articulation 3 

Literature Electives 6 

62 



uA. 


Recommended 


Recommended 


9 


Sequence of Courses 


Sequence of Courses 




for AS. 


forAA. 




(This assumes any 


(This assumes any 


4 


necessary developmen- 


necessary developmen- 




tal requirements have 


tal requirements have 


3 

3 


been met) 


been met) 


Semester I 


Semester I 




AHI 139 3 


AHI 139 3 




HEX. 7.7.?. 3 


HEL 222 3 




HEW 101 3 


HEW 101 3 




HSS 143 3 


PFW 100 2 




Literature Elec 3 


Foreign Lang 4 




Total Hours: 15 


Total Hours: 15 


28 






3 


Semester II 


Semester n 


1 
3 


ASO 151 3 


HEL 223 3 


7, 


HEL 223 3 


HEW 210 3 


3 


HEW 210 3 


HSS 143 3 


PFW 100 2 


SMA 101 3 


i 


SMA 101 3 




3 


Literature Elec 3 


Total Hours: 16 


8 


Total Hours: 17 






Semester ITJ 


Semester HI 




APS 142 3 


ASO 151 3 




HEG 249 3 


HEG 249 3 


25 


HF.T.224 3 


HEL 224 3 


1 


Hiimanifies Flee . 3 


Humanities Elec 3 


1 
3 
3 


Lab Science Elec ... 3 


Lab Science Elec... 3 


Total Hours: 15 


Total Hours: 15 


3 


-Semester IV 


Semester IV 


3 

3 


HEG 250 3 


APS 142 3 


3 


HEL22S(R/J*7S; 3 


HEG 250 3 


HEW 202/ 


HEL n%(R/W/S) 3 




Literature Elec 3 


HSS 201 3 


. 


HSS 201 3 


Humanities Elec .... 3 


7, 


Humanities Elec .... 3 


Total Hours: 15 




Total Hours: 15 




~62 







1 Students not qualifying for HEW 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: 
(1) HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and n, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and HEL 221 Introduction 
to World Literature I and n. If the latter option is chosen, HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the 
Humanities Common Core requirement. 



65 



History Concentration 



This curriculum is designed to permit the student to begin a concentration in history that will lead 
eventually to a major in that field. History provides a good background for pre-law, government service, 
and teaching. 

Credit Hours - A.S. t 

General Education Requirements 

Basic Skills Core 9 

HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW112 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra -or- 

SMA102 College Algebra 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by APO 201 or 211 
orAEC201. 

The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by APO 201 or 211. 
The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by APO 211. 
The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by SMA 102 or a 
subsequent mathematics course or bypassing a mathematics assess- 
ment examination. 

Liberal Education Core 20 

HEW 102 English Composition n 1 3 

PFW 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 

Laboratory Science Elective - Common Core List 3 

Humanities Elective - Common Core List 3 

Humanities Elective - Broad Core List - 

AEC201 Microeconomics - 

AEC 202 Macroeconomics - 

Social Science Electives - Core List 6 

Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective - 

Broad Core List 3 

Foreign Language Electives - 

The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across 
the Curriculum. 

Concentration Requirements 33 

AEC 201 Microeconomics 3 

AEC 202 Macroeconomics 3 

AHI 125 History of American Technology -or- 

AS0 254 Introduction to Archaeology - 

AHI 139 American History I -and/or- 

AHI 235 World Civilization 1 6 

AHI 140 American History II -and/or- 

AHI 236 World Civilization II 6 

APO 111 American National Government 3 

APO 201 Introduction to Political Science. 3 

APO 21 1 Introduction to World Politics 3 

ASO 151 Principles of Sociology 3 

SES 207 World Geography 3 

Elective - 

62 



"*■ 


Recommended 


Recommended 


9 

3 

3 
3 


Sequence of Courses 
for AS. 

(This assumes any 
necessary developmen- 
tal requirements have 
been met) 


Sequence of Courses 

for AA. 
(This assumes any 
necessary developmen- 
tal requirements have 
been met 


Semester I 


Semester I 




AHI 235 3 


AHI 139/235 3 




HEW 101 3 


HEW 101 3 




HSS 143 3 


HSS 143 3 




SocSciElec 3 

Total Hours: 12 


Foreign Lang 4 

Elective 1 

Total Hours: 14 


28 


Semester n 


Semester II 






3 
2 
3 


AHI 236 3 

Xt02Q\(R/W) 3 
HEW 102 3 


APO201(H/JP) 3 

HEW 102 .....3 

PFW 100 2 


3 
3 


PFW 100 2 


SMA 101/102 3 


SMA 101/102 3 
SocSciElec 3 


Foreign Lang 4 
Total Hours: 15 


3 


Total Hours: 17 




3 








Semester m 


Semester m 


8 


AEC 201 (R) 3 

AHI 139 3 


AEC201(RJ 3 
APO 111 -...3 




APO 111 3 


ASO 151 -...3 




ASO 151 3 


SES 207 3 




SES 207 3 


Humanities Elec.... 3 


25 


Hum/Sci/Math 
Elective _ 3 


Total Hours: 15 


- 


Total Hours: 18 




i 


Semester IV : ;~g§ 


Semester TV 


3 


AEC 202. 3 


AEC 202 3 




AHI 140 3 


AHI 125/ 


3 


AP0 211(K/JF/S; 3 
Humanities Elec 3 


ASO 254 3 

AHI 140/236 3 


3 
3 


Lab Science Elec ... 3 
Total Hoars: 15 


AP0 211(H/WS; 3 

Humanities Elec 3 


3 




Lab Science Elec... 3 


3 




Total Hours: IS 


3 
1 






62 







1 Students not qualifying for HEW 1 12 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: 
(1) HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and n, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and 221 Introduction to 
World Literature I and n. If the latter option is chosen HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities 
Common Core Requirement. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing for 
HEW 102. 



Liberal Arts Concentration 



This broad-based curriculum provides the general education required of majors in many areas of 
concentration at the baccalaureate institutions to which they transfer. 



Credit Hours - AJ5. A.A. 
General Education Requirements 
Basic Skills Core 9 9 

HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW 112 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra (or higher mathe- 
matics) 3 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 3 

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be 
metbyHPP212. 

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subse- 
quent mathematics course or bypassing a mathematics assess- 
ment examination. 

Liberal Education Core 23 31 

HEW 102 English Composition II -or- 

HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing 1 3 3 

Computer Literacy Elective 3 3 

PFW 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 2 

Laboratory Science Elective - Common Core List 3 3 

HEH 110 Introduction to Humanities I -or- 
HEL220 Introduction to World Literature I -or- 

HEL227 Introduction to World Fiction 3 3 

HEH 111 Introduction to Humanities II -or- 

HEL221 Introduction to World Literature II 3 3 

AEC201 Microeconomics -or- 

AS0151 Principles of Sociology 3 3 

AEC202 Macroeconomics -or- 
AS0 252 Social Problems -or- 

AS0 245 Cultural Diversity 3 3 

Intermediate Foreign Language - 8 

Concentration Requirements 30 24-26 
AHI131 Survey of European History I -or- 

AHI139 American History 1 3 3 

AHI 132 Survey of European History II -or- 

AHI140 American History II 3 3 

HAH 110 Art Appreciation -or- 

HMM 118 Music Appreciation 3 3 

HPP111 Introduction to Philosophy 3 3 

HPP212 Introduction to Ethics 3 3 

Laboratory Science Elective 3 3 

Foreign Language -or- Electives 2 12 6-8 

~62 64-66 



Recommended 

Sequence of Courses 

for AS. 

(This assumes any 
necessary developmen- 
tal requirements have 
been met) 



Semester I 



HAH110/HMM 

118 3 

HEW 101 3 

HSS 143 3 

For Lang/Elec _6 

Total Hours: IS 



Semester II 



HEW 102 3 

SMA 101 3 

For Lang/Elec 6 

Lab Science Elec ..._3 
Total Hours: IS 



Semester m 



AEC201/ASO1S1..3 

AHI 13 1/139 3 

HEH 110/ 

HEL 220/227 3 

HPP111 3 

Lab Science Elec ... 3 
Total Hours: 15 



Recommended 

Sequence of Courses 

forAA. 

(This assumes any 
necessary developmen- 
tal requirements have 
been met) 



Semester I 



AHI 13 1/139 3 

HAH110/HMM 

118 3 

HEW 101 3 

HSS 143 3 

For Lang/Elec .. 3-4 
Total Hours: 15-16 



Semester H 



AHI 132/140 3 

HEW 102 3 

SMA 101 3 

For Lang/Elec 3-4 

Lab Sci Elec 3 

Total Hours: 15-16 



Semester m 



Semester TV 



AEC202/ 

ASO 245/252 3 

AHI 132/140 3 

HEH111/HEL221..3 

HPP 2\2(R/WS) 3 

PFW 100 2 

Comp Lit Elec _3 

Total Hours: 17 



AEC201/ASO151..3 
HEH 110/ 

HEL 220/227 3 

HPP 111 3 

Intenn For Lang 4 

Lab Sci Elec _3 

Total Hours: 16 



Semester IV 



AEC202/ 

ASO 245/252 3 

HEH111/HEL221..3 

HPP212fR/FT/S; 3 

PFW 100 2 

Comp Lit Elec 3 

Intenn For Lang ...._4 
Total Hours: 18 



o 

€0 

T- 
: 



1 Students not qualifying for HEW 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: 
(1) HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and n, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and 221 Introduction to 
World Literature I and H If the latter option is chosen HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the 
Humanities Common Core Requirement. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute HEW 210 Advanced Expository 
Writing for HEW 102. 

2 Foreign Language is not required for the A.S. degree; however, it is required of students transferring to Indiana University and 
Purdue University on this curriculum. Recommended electives include: APO 21 1 Introduction to World Politics, APO 212 Political 
Science Seminar, BMM 100 Introduction to Business, HEH 245 Cultural Diversity, HPP 213 Logic, HPP 220 Philosophy of Religion, 
SES 210 General Astronomy, and SMA 115 Survey of Calculus I. 



m 



67 



Philosophy Concentration 



This curriculum prepares students planning to become professional philosophers for transfer to four-year 
institutions and completion of the baccalaureate degree in philosophy. Essentially a Liberal Arts program, 
it will also help prepare for graduate studies in law, theology, humanities, and other disciplines. 



Credit Hours - A-A. 
General Education Requirements 
Basic Skills Core 9 

HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW 112 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra (or higher mathematics) 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 

The Reading and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by HPP 212. 

The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by HPP 213. 

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course 

or bypassing a mathematics assessment examination. 

Liberal Education Core 28 

HEW 102 English Composition H 1 3 

PFW 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 

Laboratory Science Elective — Common Core List 3 

HEL 220 Introduction to World Literature 1 3 

HEL 221 Introduction to World Literature II 3 

APO 201 Introduction to Political Science -or- 

AEC 100 Elements of Economics 3 

ASO 151 Principles of Sociology 3 

Intermediate Foreign Languages 2 8 



The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum. 



27 



Concentration Requirements 

AHI 131 Survey of European History I -or- 

AHI 235 World Civilization 1 3 

AHI 132 Survey of European History II -or- 

AHI 236 World Civilization H 3 

HAH 110 Art Appreciation -or- 

HMM 118 Music Appreciation 3 

HEH 110 Introduction to Humanities 1 3 

HPP 111 Introduction to Philosophy 3 

HPP 212 Introduction to Ethics 3 

HPP 213 Logic 3 

HPP 220 Philosophy of Religion 3 

Science Elective 3 

~64 



Recommended 
Sequence of Courses 

(This sequence assumes 
any necessary develop- 
mental requirements have 
been met) 



Semester I 



AHI 131/235 3 

HEW 101 3 

HPP 111 3 

HSS 143 3 

Foreign Lang _4 

Total Hours: 16 



Semester II 



AHI 132/236 3 

HEW 102 3 

HPP212(R/S; 3 

PFW 100 2 

SMA 101 3 

Foreign Language .-_4 
Total Hours: 18 



Semester IQ 



ASO 151 3 

HEH 110 3 

HEL 220 3 

HPP 220 3 

Lab Science Elec _3 

Total Hours: 15 



Semester IV 



APO 201/AEC 100 3 

HEL 221 3 

HAH110/HMM118..3 

HPP 213(1*9 3 

Science Elec _3 

Total Hours: 15 



1 Students not qualifying for HEW 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: 
(1) HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and n, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and 221 Introduction to 
World Literature I and H. If the latter option is chosen HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities 
Common Core Requirement. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing for 
HEW 102. 

2 Foreign Language is not required for the A.S. degree; however, it is required of students transferring to Indiana University and Purdue 
University on this curriculum. Recommended electives include: APO 211 Introduction to World Politics, APO 212 Political Science 
Seminar, BMM 100 Introduction to Business, HEH 245 Cultural Diversity, HPP 213 Logic, HPP 220 Philosophy of Religion, SES 210 
General Astronomy, and SMA 115 Survey of Calculus I. 



68 



Political Science Concentration 

This curriculum is designed to permit the student to begin a concentration in political science that will lead 
eventually to a major in that field. Political science provides an excellent background for pre-law, public 
service, public relations, personnel work, investigation, or teaching. 



Credit Hours - A.S. A -A. 
General Education Requirements 
Basic Skills Core 9 9 

HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW112 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra -or- 

SMA102 College Algebra 3 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 3 

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by APO 

201orAPO211. 

The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by APO 211. 

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by SMA 102 or a 

subsequent mathematics course or bypassing a mathematics 

assessment examination. 

Liberal Education Core 20 28 

HEW 102 English Composition II 1 3 3 

PFW 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 2 

Laboratory Science Elective - Common Core List 3 3 

Humanities Elective - Common Core List 3 3 

Humanities Elective - Broad Core List - 3 

AEC201 Microeconomics 3 3 

AEC202 Macroeconomics 3 3 

Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective - 

Broad Core List 3 

Foreign Language Electives - 8 

The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computer Across 
the Curriculum. 

Concentration Requirements 33 25 

AHI 139 American History I -and/or- 

AHI235 World Civilization 1 6 3 

AHI 140 American History II -and/or- 

AHI236 World Civihzationn 6 3 

APO 111 American National Government and/or— 

APO 112 State and Local Government 2 6 3 

APO 201 Introduction to Political Science 3 3 

APO 210 Personal Law 3 3 

APO 211 Introduction to World Politics 3 3 

APO 220 Public Administration 3 3 

SES207 World Geography 3 3 

Elective - 1 

62 6~2 



Recommended 

Sequence of Courses 

for AS. 

(This assumes any 
necessary develop- 
mental requirements 
have been met 



Semester I 



AHI 139 3 

APO Hi 3 

HEW 101 3 

Hum/Sci/Math 

Elective 3 

Total Hours: 13 



Semester n 



AHI 140 3 

HEW 102 3 

HSS 143 3 

PFW 100 2 

SMA 101/102 3 

Lab Science Elec ... 3 
Total Hours: 17 



Recommended 

Sequence of Courses 

forAA. 

(This assumes any 
necessary develop- 
mental requirements 
have been met) 



Semester I 



HEW 101 3 

HSS 143 3 

Foreign Lang 4 

Humanities Elec 3 

Elective 1 

Total Hours: 14 



Semester n 



AHI 139/235 3 

HEW 102 3 

PFW 100 2 

SMA 101/102 3 

Foreign Lang 4 

Lab Science Elec .. _3 
Total Hours: 18 



Semester m 



AEC 201 (R) 3 

AHI 235 3 

APO201(R/B9 3 

APO 210 3 

APO 220 3 

SES 207 _3 

Total Hours: IS 



Semester IV 



AEC 202 3 

AHI 236 3 

APO 111 3 

AP0 211(R/?F/S? 3 

Humanities Elec ...._3 
Total Hours: 15 



Semester m g£; 

AEC201(Kj 3 

APO201(K/l*9 3 

APO 210 3 

APO 220 3 

SES 207 _3 

Total Hours: 15 



Semester IV 



AEC 202 3 

AHI 140/236 3 

APO 11 1/1 12 3 

AP0 2U(K/r/S.)....3 

Humanities Elec.... 3 

Total Hours: 15 



SB 

SL 
CD 

s 



CO 
fid 

S 



1 Students not qualifying for HEW 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: 
(1) HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and H, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and 221 Introduction to 
World Literature I and II. If the latter option is chosen HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities 
Common Core Requirement. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing for 
HEW 102. 

2 A.S. students must complete both APO 111 and 112. 

69 



Pre-Law Concentration 



There is no single course of study for pre-law majors. Law schools generally desire superior students who 
have completed a liberal arts program, but a large number of law students come from schools of business. 
Political science provides a good major, and business, history, English, mathematics, psychology, 
philosophy and economics are good minors. The program below is essentially a liberal arts curriculum. 

Credit Hours -AS. 
General Education Requirements 
Basic Skills Core 9 

HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW112 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra -or- 

SMA 102 College Algebra 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by APO 
201 or 211. 

The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by APO 211. 
The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by SMA 102 or a 
subsequent mathematics course or bypassing a mathematics assess- 
ment examination. 

Liberal Education Core 20 

HEW 102 English Composition n 1 3 

PFW 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 

Laboratory Science Elective - Common Core List 3 

Literature Elective - Common Core List 3 

Literature Elective - Broad Core List 3 

AEC 201 Microeconomics 3 

AEC 202 Macroeconomics 3 

Foreign Language Electives - 

The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across 
the Curriculum. 

Concentration Requirements 33 

AHI 139 American History 1 3 

AHI 140 American History II 3 

AHI 235 World Civilization 1 3 

Affl 236 World Civilization E 3 

APO 111 American National Government 3 

APO 201 Introduction to Political Science 3 

APO 210 Personal Law 3 

APO 21 1 Introduction to World Politics 3 

APS 142 General Psychology 3 

Electives 6 

62 



AA. 








Recommended 


Recommended 


9 


Sequence of Courses 


Sequence of Courses 




for AS. 


for AA. 




(This assumes any 


(This assumes any 


i 


necessary developmen- 


necessary developmen- 




tal requirements have 


tal requirements have 


3 
3 


been met) 


been met) 


, Semester I 


Semester I 


O 


AHI 139 3 


AHI 139 3 




HEW 101 3 


HEW 101 3 




LabSciElec 3 


Foreign Lang 4 


a 


Elective 3 


LabSciElec 3 




Total Hours: 12 


Total Hours: 13 


28 

3 


Semester n 


Semester II 


AHI 140 3 


AHI 140 3 


2 


APO 111 3 


APO 111 3 


3 


HEW 102 3 


HEW 102 3 


3 
3 


PFW 100 2 


PFW 100 2 


SMA 101/102 3 


SMA 101/102 3 


Elective 3 


Foreign Lang 4 


i 
3 
8 


Total Hours: 17 


Total Hours: 18 


Semester HI 


Semester HI 




AEC 201 3 


AEC 201 3 




AHI 235 3 


AHI 235 3 




APO 20\(R/W) 3 


APO201(K/»9 3 


27 


HSS 143 3 


HSS 143 3 


3 


Literature Elec 3 


Literature Elec 3 


3 
3 


Total Hours: 15 


Total Hours: 15 


3 


Semester IV 


Semester TV 


3 
3 


AEC 202 3 


AEC 202 3 


3 


AHI 236 3 


AHI 236 3 


APO 210 3 


APO 210 3 


3 


AP02U(S/W/S) 3 


AP0 211(R/JT/5; 3 


3 


APS 142 3 


APS 142 3 




Literature Elec 3 


Literature Elec 3 




Total Hours: 18 


Total Hours: 18 


64 







1 Students not qualifying for HEW 1 1 2 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: 
(1) HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and n, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and 221 Introduction to 
World Literature I and n. If the latter option is chosen HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities 
Common Core Requirement. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing for 
HEW 102. 



70 



Psychology Concentration 



This option is designed to permit the student to begin a concentration in psychology that will lead 
eventually to a major in that field. The study of psychology prepares a person for positions in industry, 
education, government, business, health care and religion. 

Credit Hours -A.S. 
General Education Requirements 
Basic Skills Core 9 

HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW 112 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra -or- 

SMA 102 College Algebra 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met 
byAPS249. 

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by SMA 102 or a 
subsequent mathematics course or bypassing a mathematics assess- 
ment examination. 

Liberal Education Core 20 

HEW 102 English Composition II 1 3 

PFW 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 

SIL 101 Introductory Biology -or- 

SLS 100 Human Biology 3 

Humanities Elective — Common Core List 3 

Humanities Elective - Broad Core List - 

AHI 139 American History I -or- 

AHI235 World Civilization 1 3 

AHI 140 American History n -or- 

AHI236 World Civilization H 3 

Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective - 

Broad Core List 2 3 

Foreign Language Electives - 

The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across 
the Curriculum. 

Concentration Requirements 33 

APS 142 General Psychology 3 

APS 201 Developmental Psychology 3 

APS 249 Abnormal Psychology 3 

AS0 151 Principles of Sociology 3 

ASO 252 Social Problems 3 

200-level Psychology Elective 3 

Social Science Electives 12 

Elective 3 

62 



AJL. 








Recommended 


Recommended 


9 


Sequence of Courses 
for AS. 


Sequence of Courses 
forAA. 


3 

3 
3 


(This assumes any 
necessary developmen- 
tal requirements have 
been met) 


(This assumes any 
necessary developmen- 
tal requirements have 
been met) 


Semester I 


Semester I 


met 


APS 142 3 


APS 142 3 




ASO 151 3 


ASO 151 3 


a 


HEW 101 3 


HEW 101 3 




SocSciElec 3 


PFW 100 2 




Elective 3 

Total Hours: 15 


Foreign Lang 4 

Total Hours: 15 


28 






3 


Semester n 


Semester II 


2 








AHI 139/235 3 


AHI 139/235 3 


3 


ASO 252 3 


ASO 252 3 


3 


HEW 102 3 


HEW 102 3 


HSS 143 3 


HSS 143 3 


3 


PFW 100 2 

Humanities Elec .... 3 


Foreign Lang. 4 
Total Hours: 16 


3 


Total Hours: 17 




3 


Semester m 


Semester m 


APS 201 3 


APS 201 3 


- 


SIL 101/SLS 100 3 


SIL 101/SLS 100 3 


8 


SMA 101/102 3 


SMA 101/102 3 




Soc Sci Elec 6 


Hrananiries Elec 3 




Total Hours: 1 5 


SocSciElec 3 

Elective 3 

Total Hours: 18 


27 


Semester IV 


Semester IV 


3 

3 


AHI 140/236 3 


AHI 140/236 3 


3 


APS249(S/KT/S/ 3 

Hum/Sci/Math 


APS249(RW/S) 3 
Humanities Elec 3 


3 
3 
3 


Elective 3 

Psychology Elec 3 
Soc Sci Elec 3 


Psychology Elec 3 

SocSciElec 3 

Total Hours: 15 


6 

3 


Total Hours: 15 




64 







■•■ ' 

nil 

SO 
53 

mm 



4. \ 

test 

III 



1 Students not qualifying for HEW 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: 
(1) HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and II, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and 221 Introduction to 
World Literature I and n. If the latter option is chosen HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities 
Common Core Requirement. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing for 
HEW 102. 

2 SMA 117 Finite Mathematics recommended for students transferring to Indiana University. 



71 



Sociology Concentration 



This curriculum is designed to provide students with the first two years of an academic program 
specializing in preparing students for professional career positions in local, state, or national government 
and/or governmental agencies. The program is designed to transfer to Ball State University, Indiana State 
University, and Indiana University. 

Credit Hours -A.S. AA 

General Education Requirements 

Basic Skills Core 9 9 

HEW 101 English Composition I -or- 

HEW 1 12 Rhetoric and Research 1 3 3 

SMA 101 Intermediate Algebra 3 3 

HSS 143 Speech 3 3 



The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met 
by APO 211, APS 249 or ASO 245. 

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent 
mathematics course or bypassing a mathematics assessment exami- 
nation. 

Liberal Education Core 20 28 

HEW 102 English Composition H 1 3 3 

PFW 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness 2 2 

Laboratory Science Elective - Common Core List 3 3 

Humanities Elective - Common Core List 3 3 

Humanities Elective - Broad Core List - 3 

AHI 139 American History 1 3 3 

AHI 140 American History II 3 3 

Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective - 

Broad Core List 3 

Foreign Language Electives - 8 

The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across 
the Curriculum. 

Concentration Requirements 33 27 

AEC201 Microeconomics -or- 

200-Level Social Science Elective 3 3 

AEC202 Macroeconomics -or- 

200-Level Social Science Elective 3 3 

APS 142 General Psychology 3 3 

APS 201 Developmental Psychology 3 

ASO 151 Principles of Sociology 3 3 

ASO 154 Cultural Anthropology 3 3 

ASO 252 Social Problems 3 3 

ASO 253 Introduction to Social Psychology 3 3 

ASO 254 Introduction to Archaeology -or- 

200-Level Social Science Elective 3 3 

Directed Elective 2 3 3 

Elective . 3 

62 64 



Recommended 

Sequence of Courses 

forAS. 

(This assumes any 
necessary developmen- 
tal requirements have 
been met) 



Semester I 



AHI 139 3 

APS 142 3 

ASO 151 3 

HEW 101 _3 

Total Hours: 12 



Semester U 



ASO 252 3 

ASO254/200-Level 

Soc Sci Elec 3 

HEW 102 3 

HSS 143 3 

Hum/Sci/Math 

Elective 3 

Lab Science Elec..._3 
Total Hours: 18 



Semester HI 



AEC201/200-Level 

Soc Sci Elec 3 

AHI 140 3 

APS 201 3 

SMA 101 3 

Humanities Elec 3 

PFW 100 _2 

Total Hours: 17 



Recommended 
Sequence of Courses 

forA^i. 
(This assumes any 
necessary developmen- 
tal requirements have 
been met) 



Semester I 



APS 142 3 

ASO 151 3 

HEW 101 3 

PFW 100 2 

Foreign Lang 4 

Total Hours: 15 



Semester H 



ASO 254/200-Level 

Soc Sci Elec 3 

HEW 102 3 

HSS 143 3 

Foreign Lang 4 

Lab Science Elec... 3 
Total Hours: 16 



Semester m 



Semester TV 



AEC 202/200-Level 

Soc Sci Elec 3 

ASO 154 3 

ASO 253 3 

Electives _6 

Total Hours: 15 



AEC201/200-Level 

Soc Sci Elec 3 

AHI 139 3 

ASO 252 3 

SMA 101 3 

Elective _3 

Total Hours: 15 



Semester TV 



AEC 202/200-Level 

Soc Sci Elec 3 

AHI 140 3 

ASO 154 3 

ASO 253 3 

Humanities Elec .... _6 
Total Hours: 18 



1HEW 101 and HEW 102 English Composition I and n, or (2) HEW 101 English Composition I, HEL 220 and HEL 221 Introduction to 
World Literature I and n. If the latter option is chosen, HEL 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities 
Common Core requirement. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing for 
HEW 102. 

2 Students must choose one of the following classes to meet intensive requirements APO 211 Introduction to Word Politics, APS 249 
Abnormal Psychology or ASO 245 Cultural Diversity. 



72 



££ 



Machine Tool Technology 



Specialties: 

Traditional 
CO-HORT 

The Machine Tool Technology program is designed to prepare students for the metals manufacturing 
industry. Graduates from this program are employed as skilled machinists, CNC operators, program- 
mers or tool and die makers. The curriculum offers a systematic approach to developing skills in 
milling, turning, precision grinding and CNC programming and machining. In addition to the techni- 
cal subject in machining, proficiency in mathematics, communication, physics and basic computer 
skills is required. 

CD 
The program offers two unique ways to obtain an A.A.S. in Machine Tool Technology. The tradition- 
al path allows the student to take prescribed courses when individual schedules and offered courses 
coincide. This type of program is important for students who work during the day. The second path 
offers a CO-HORT approach where students enroll full time during the day and finish their degree in 
four consecutive semesters. This path of instruction is more rigorous in terms of the time on task in 
the laboratories. The CO-HORT student will invest over 2000 hours in the instructional program lead- 
ing to an Associate in Applied Science degree. The CO-HORT program was developed to the specifi- 
cations of the Indianapolis Chapter of the National Tooling and Machine Association (NTMA). The 
program uses books and materials recommended by NTMA. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science 

Traditional Specially - 64 credits 

CO-HORT Specialty - 73 credits 
Technical Certificate - 33 credits 

CO 



a) 

3 



73 



Associate of Applied Science 



CO-HORT Specialty 



To receive this degree, you must earn 73 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 Speech 

HEW 101 

MAT 112 

MAT 121 

SIP 101 

AEC 100 



English Composition I 

Functional Mathematics 

Geometry/Trigonometry 

Physics I 

Elements of Economics 



19 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 



Technical Core 18 credits 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 3 

IDS 102 Introduction to Print Reading 3 

MIT 260 Quality Control & Advanced Problem Solving 3 

TEC 101 Manufacturing Processes 3 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

CO-HORT Specialty 36 credits 

Geometric Dimensions and Tolerancing 3 

Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding 3 

Introduction to Machining 3 

Introduction to Machining Practicum 3 

CNC Programming I 3 

CNC Programming II 3 

Machine Operations I 3 

Machine Operations I Practicum 3 

Machine Operations II 3 

Machine Operations II Practicum 3 

CNC Machining 3 

CNC Machining Practicum 3 



Specialty Core 


-CO- 


DCT 


227 


WLD 


208 


MTT 


101 


MTT 


250 


MTT 


208 


MTT 


209 


MTT 


240 


MTT 


251 


MTT 


241 


MTT 


252 


MTT 


242 


MTT 


253 



74 



Associate of Applied Science 



Traditional Specialty 



To receive this degree, you must earn 64 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 Speech 

HEW 101 

MAT 111 

MAT 121 

SIP 101 

XXX XXX 



English Composition I 
Intermediate Algebra 
Geometry /Trigonometry 
Physics I 
Humanities/Social Science 



Technical Core 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 

IDS 102 Introduction to Print Reading 

MIT 260 Quality Control & Advanced Problem Solving 

TEC 101 Manufacturing Processes 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 



Specialty Core 


- Traditional Specialty 


QSC 


203 


Metrology 


MTT 


102 


Turning Processes 


MTT 


103 


Milling Process 


MTT 


104 


Machinery Handbook 


MTT 


204 


Abrasive Processes 


MTT 


208 


CNC Programming I 


MTT 


209 


CNC Programming n 


MTT 


220 


CAD/CAM I 


MTT 


221 


CAD/CAM H 



19 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

27 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



o 

CD 

3 



Recommended Electives 

AEC 100 Elements of Economics 

HPP 111 Introduction to Philosophy 

HPP 212 Introduction to Ethics 

AHI 139 American History I 






as 

3 



75 



Technical Certificate 



To receive this certificate you must earn 33 credits. 



General Education Core 


6 credits 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


Technical Core 






27 credits 


DSN 


103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


IDS 


102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


TEC 


101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 


TEC 


102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


MTT 


102 


Turning Processes 


3 


MTT 


103 


Milling Process 


3 


MTT 


104 


Machinery Handbook 


3 


MTT 


204 


Abrasive Processes 


3 



76 



Manufacturing and Industrial Technology 



Specialties: 

Heating, Ventilation/Air Conditioning 

Industrial Maintenance 

Welding 

The Manufacturing and Industrial Technology Program is a discipline devoted to the development of 
skills necessary for the installation, operation and maintenance of residential and industrial equipment 
and systems. The curriculum is broad-based and offers specialties, but focuses on the integration of 
each area as used in systemic applications. This requires proficiency in mathematics, communication, 
physics and basic computer skills, as well as the technical subject matter. 

In laboratory applications of classroom study, each student uses the tools and instruments associated 
with the practice of the industrial technology specialty including volt-ohm meters, leak detectors, sonic 
diagnostic tools, pressure and level testing devices, preventive maintenance software programs, weld- 
ing and brazing equipment, metallurgical testing instruments, hand tools, and electronic and precision 
measuring devices. The safe use of tools and materials is integrated into each course in the curriculum. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 64 credits 
Technical Certificates - 39 credits 



WRN& 



93 



Cft 



77 



Associate of Applied Science 



Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 64 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 

HEW 101 

MAT 111 

*MAT 121 

*SIP 101 

XXX XXX 



Speech 

English Composition I 

Intermediate Algebra 

Geometry/Trigonometry 

Physics I 

Elective 



19 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 



Technical Core 

MIT 102 

MIT 106 

MIT 260 

TEC 101 

TEC 104 

TEC 113 



Introduction to Print Reading 
Introduction to Workplace Safety 
Advanced Problem Solving 
Manufacturing Process 
Computer Fundamentals for Technology 
Basic Electricity 



Heating, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration Specialty Core 

HEA 101 Heating Fundamentals 

HEA 103 AC/Refrigeration I 

HEA 104 Heating Service 

*HEA 106 AC/Refrigeration E 



Regionally Determined Core 

*MTT 205 

*IDS 103 

*HEA 202 

HEA 220 

♦HEA 221 

General Education Elecrives 

AEC 101 

AEC 201 

AEC 202 

APO 111 

APS 142 

ASO 151 

ETH 101 

HPP 211 

♦Prerequisite class required. 



Programmable Controllers I 
Motors and Motor Control 
Electrical Circuits and Controls 
Distribution Systems 
Heat Pump and Cooling Service 



Elements of Economics 

Microeconomics 

Macroeconomics 

American National Government 

General Psychology OR 

Principles of Sociology 

Ethics 

Intro to Philosophy 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



78 



Associate of Applied Science 



Industrial Maintenance Specialty 

To receive this degree, you must earn 64 credits. 



General Educa 


Hon Core 




19 credits 


HSS 


143 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 


121* 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


3 


SIP 


101* 


Physics I (and Lab) 


4 


XXX 


XXX 


Elective 


3 


Technical Core 






18 credits 


MIT 


102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


MIT 


106 


Introduction to Workplace Safety 


3 


MIT 


260 


Advanced Problem Solving 


3 


TEC 


101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 


113 


Basic Electricity 


3 


Specialty Core 






12 credits 


*ids 


103 


Motors and Motor Controls 


3 


IDS 


104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


IMT 


203 


Machine Maintenance & Installation 


3 


*MIT 


205 


Programmable Controllers I 


3 


Locally Determined Courses (choose 5) 


15 credits 


*IMT 


107 


Preventive Maintenance 


3 


IMT 


122 


Wiring Fundamentals - Commercial 


3 


*IMT 


201 


Fluid Power Systems 


3 


*IMT 


207 


Electrical Circuits 


3 


*IMT 


210 


Pumps 


3 


**IMT 


288 


Electrical Trouble-Shooting 


3 


**IMT 


288 


National Electrical Code 


3 


WLD 


XXX 


Welding Elective - Approved by Advisor 


3 



*Prerequisite class required. 

**IMT 207 or advisor approval required. 

General Education Electives 



AEC 


101 


Elements of Economics 


AEC 


201 


Microeconomics 


AEC 


202 


Macroeconomics 


APO 


111 


American National Government 


APS 


142 


General Psychology OR 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 


ETH 


101 


Ethics 


HPP 


211 


Intro to Philosophy 



re 

3 

o 



so 

—I 

3 
m 



79 



Technical Certificates 

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Specialty 

To receive these certificates, you must earn 39 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 148 

XXX XXX 



Technical Core 




IDS 


102 


Specialty Core 




HEA 


101 


HEA 


103 


Regionally Determined Core 


HEA 


104 


*HEA 


106 


HEA 


107 


*HEA 


202 


*HEA 


221 


*IDS 


103 


TEC 


104 


TEC 


113 


General Education Electives 


AEC 


101 


AEC 


201 


AEC 


202 


APO 


111 


APS 


142 


ASO 


151 


ETH 


101 


HPP 


211 



Interpersonal Communication 
Elective 



Introduction to Print Reading 



Heating Fundamentals 
A/C and Refrigeration I 



Heating Service 

A/C and Refrigeration II 

Duct Fabrication 

Electrical Circuits and Controls 

Heat Pump and Cooling Service 

Motors and Motor Controls 

Computer Fundamentals for Technicians 

Basic Electricity 



Elements of Economics 

Microeconomics 

Macroeconomics 

American National Government 

General Psychology OR 

Principles of Sociology 

Ethics 

Introduction to Philosophy 



6 credits 

3 
3 

3 credits 

3 

6 credits 

3 
3 

24 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



♦Prerequisite class required. 



80 



Technical Certificates 



Industrial Maintenance Specialty 

To receive these certificates, you must earn 39 credits. 



General Education Core (choose 2) 



HEW 


101 


HSS 


143 


MAT 


111 


Technical Core 




MIT 


102 


Specialty Core 




IDS 


104 


TEC 


113 


Locally Determined t 


*IDS 


103 


*IMT 


107 


*IMT 


201 


IMT 


203 


*IMT 


207 


**IMT 


288 


MIT 


106 


*MIT 


205 


MIT 


260 


TEC 


104 


WLD 


XXX 



2) 


6 credits 


English Composition I 


3 


Speech 


3 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




3 credits 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 




6 credits 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


Basic Electricity 


3 


loose eight) 


24 credits 


Motors and Motor Controls 


3 


Preventive Maintenance 


3 


Fluid Power Systems 


3 


Machine Maintenance and Installation 


3 


Electrical Circuits 


3 


National Electrical Code (NEC) 


3 


Millwright 1 


3 


Programmable Controllers 


3 


Advanced Problem Solving 


3 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


Welding Elective Approved by Advisor 


3 



*Prerequisite class required. 

**IMT 207 or advisor approval required 



3S" 

Hat 

o 



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■hh 

m 



81 



Technical Certificates 



Welding Specialty 

To receive these certificates, you must earn 39 credits. 



General Education Core 




6 credits 


HSS 




148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


XXX 




XXX 


Elective 


3 


Technical Core 






3 credits 


MIT 




102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


Specialty 


Core 






6 credits 


WLD 




108 


Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 


3 


WLD 




207 


Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 


3 


Regional! 


y Determined Core 




24 credits 


TEC 




113 


Basic Electricity 


3 


WLD 




109 


Oxyacetylene Gas Welding and Cutting 


3 


*WLD 




211 


Welding Fabrication 


3 


WLD 




120 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 


3 


*WLD 




203 


Pipe Welding 


3 


*WLD 




206 


Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 


3 


WLD 




208 


Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding 


3 


*WLD 




209 


Welding Certification 


3 


General Education Electives 






AEC 




101 


Elements of Economics 


3 


AEC 




201 


Microeconomics 


3 


AEC 




202 


Macroeconomics 


3 


APO 




111 


American National Government 


3 


APS 




142 


General Psychology OR 




ASO 




151 


Principles of Sociology 


3 


ETH 




101 


Ethics 


3 


HPP 




211 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 



♦Prerequisite class required. 



82 



Medical Assistant 



A graduate of the Medical Assistant Program is a professional, multi-skilled health care provider dedi- 
cated to assisting in patient care management in ambulatory care settings. The practitioner performs 
administrative and clinical duties and may manage emergency situations, facilities, and/or personnel. 
Competence in the field also requires that a Medical Assistant display professionalism, communicate 
effectively, and provide instruction to patients. A required externship provides valuable on-the-job 
experience. 



CD 



♦ The Ivy Tech Medical Assisting program is accredited by the Commission on 
Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), on 
recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the American Association of 
Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE). 

♦ Graduates of the Medical Assistant Generalist Programs will be prepared to take 
the Certification Examination of the American Association of Medical Assistants 
(AAMA) to obtain Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) status that is recognized 

nationally. «■■ 

♦ The two-year Associate of Applied Science program requires 63 credits for 
completion. The Technical Certificate requires 30 to 48 credits, depending upon 
the selected specialty. 

♦ Salary range for Medical Assistants is from $9.50 to $14.50 per hour depending 
upon education, experience and area of specialty. 

♦ The Medical Assistant Program works in cooperation with private physicians 
offices, health maintenance organizations, and immediate care centers to provide 
clinical and administrative experiences for students. 

♦ A one-year, part-time limited radiology curriculum is available to medical assistant 
graduates, leading to an opportunity to sit for the H)H Limited General Certificate 
Examination in radiography. 

♦ Passing this exam qualifies the Limited General Technologist to perform general 
radiography in non-hospital settings. The salary range is $11.00 to $14.50 
per hour. 






Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 63 credits 
Technical Certificate - 48 credits 

Average Salary y^ 

$21,000 based upon total salaries reported by graduate respondents 



83 



Associate of Applied Science 



Generalist Specialty 



To receive this degree, you must earn 63 credits. 



General Education Core 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 

ANP 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 

HEW 101 English Composition I 

xxx xxx English/Communication Elective 

(HSS 148 Interpersonal Communications is recommended) 

MAT xxx Math Elective 

(MAT 111 Algebra is recommended) 

xxx xxx Humanities/Social/Physical Science Elective 

(APS 142 General Psychology is recommended) 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



Recommendations for electives are chosen to be best suited for the CMA examination at the end of the program. 



Technical Core 






18 credits 


HHS 




101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


HHS 




105 


Medical Law and Ethics 


3 


MEA 




113 


Pharmacology 


3 


MEA 




131 


Medical Financial Management 
with Computer Applications 


3 


MEA 




136 


Office Administration with Computer Applications 


3 


MEA 




203 


Disease Conditions 


3 


Specialty Core 






21 credits 


MEA 




114 


M.A. Lab Techniques 


3 


MEA 




120 


M.A. Clinical Externship 


3 


MEA 




121 


M.A. Administrative Externship 


3 


MEA 




135 


Medical Word Processing/Transcription 


3 


MEA 




137 


Medical Insurance and Basic Coding 
with Computer Applications 


3 


MEA 




138 


Clinical I 


3 


MEA 




139 


Clinical H 


3 


Regional Electives (see 


list) 


6 credits 


*xxx 


xxx 


Administrative Electives 


3 


*xxx 


xxx 


Clinical Electives 


3 



* Per approval of program chair 

Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist MEA-AAS degree and the generalist MEA- TC degree lead to certification as a medical 
assistant Students graduating with a specialty TC are not eligible to sit for the Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) exam. 



84 



Technical Certificate 



Administrative Specialty 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 30 credits. 

General Education Core 

xxx xxx English/Communications Elective 

xxx xxx Math/Humanities/Social/Physical Science Elective 

(APS 142 General Psychology is recommended) 



Technical Core 

HHS 101 

Specialty Core 

HHS 105 
MEA 136 



Medical Terminology 



Medical Law and Ethics 
Office Administration with 
Computer Applications 



Regionally determined courses 



MEA 131 



MEA 135 
MEA 137 



MEA 227 
MEA xxx 



Medical Financial Management with 

Computer Applications 

Medical Word Processing/Transcription 

Medical Insurance and Basic Coding with 

Computer Applications 

Advanced Administrative Procedures 

Medical Assisting Elective 



6 credits 

3 
3 



3 credits 

3 

6 credits 

3 
3 



15 credits 

3 



a. 

CD 

3 



There are other courses that will aid in gaining skills in this area. These courses are optional and do not count 
toward the degree requirements for this certificate. These courses would count towards the next higher level of the 
medical assisting program should you choose to further your education in the field. Please check with the program 
chair for further information. Students are also encouraged to complete the optional externship for this certificate; 
although it is not required it could be helpful in gaining employment in the field upon graduation. Externships are 
an excellent way to gain experience in the field. 

Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist MEA-AAS degree and the generalist MEA-TC degree lead to certifi- 
cation as a medical assistant Students graduating with a specialty TC are not eligible to sit for the Certified 
Medical Assistant (CMA) exam. 






Cft 



85 



Technical Certificate 



Clinical Specialty 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 30 credits. 



General Education Core 

xxx xxx English/Communications Elective 

(HSS 148 Interpersonal Communications is recommended) 
xxx xxx Math/Hum/Socl/Physical Science Elective 

(APS 142 General Psychology or a lab science class is recommended) 



6 credits 

3 



Technical Core 

HHS 101 



Medical Terminology 



3 credits 

3 



Specialty Core 

ANP 101 
ANP 102 



Anatomy and Physiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 



6 credits 

3 
3 



Regionally determined courses 

MEA 113 Pharmacology 

MEA 1 14 Medical Assisting Lab Techniques 

MEA 138 Clinical I 

MEA 139 Clinical II 

MEA 212 Phlebotomy 



15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



There are other courses that will aid in gaining skills in this area. These courses are optional and do not count 
toward the degree requirements for this certificate. These courses would count towards the next higher level of the 
medical assisting program should you choose to further your education in the field. Please check with the program 
chair for further information. Students are also encouraged to complete the optional externship for this certificate; 
although it is not required it could be helpful in gaining employment in the field upon graduation. Externships are 
an excellent way to gain experience in the field. 

There are first aid and CPR certification requirements for this TC-please see the program chair for further infor- 
mation. 

Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist MEA-AAS degree and the generalist MEA-TC degree lead to certifi- 
cation as a medical assistant Students graduating with a specialty TC are not eligible to sit for the Certified 
Medical Assistant (CMA) exam. 



86 



Technical Certificate 



Generalist Specialty 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 48 credits. 

General Education Core 

xxx xxx English/Communications Elective 

(HEW 101 English Composition I is recommended) 
xxx xxx Math/Hum/Soc/Physical Science Elective 

(APS 142 General Psychology is recommended) 
***Recommendations for electives are chosen to be best suited for the 
CMA examination at the end of the program.*** 



Medical Terminology 



6 credits 

3 



Technical Core 


HHS 


101 


Specia 


Ity Core 


ANP 


101 


ANP 


102 


HHS 


105 


MEA 


113 


MEA 


114 


MEA 


120 


MEA 


121 


MEA 


131 


MEA 


135 


MEA 


136 


MEA 


137 


MEA 


138 


MEA 


139 



Anatomy and Physiology I 

Anatomy and Physiology II 

Medical Law and Ethics 

Pharmacology 

Medical Assisting Lab Techniques 

Medical Assisting Clinical Externship 

Medical Assisting Administrative Externship 

Medical Financial Management with 

Computer Applications 

Medical Word Processing/Transcription 

Office Administration with 

Computer Applications 

Medical Insurance and Basic Coding with 

Computer Applications 

Clinical I 

Clinical II 



3 credits 

3 

39 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 



3> 
o 

e. 

CD 



There are other courses that will aid in gaining skills in this area. These courses are optional and do not count 
toward the degree requirements for this certificate. These courses would count towards the next higher level of the 
medical assisting program should you choose to further your education in the field. Please check with the program 
chair for further information. Students are also encouraged to complete the optional externship for this certificate; 
although it is not required it could be helpful in gaining employment in the field upon graduation. Externships are 
an excellent way to gain experience in the field. 

There are first aid and CPR certification requirements for this TC-please see the program chair for further infor- 
mation. 

Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist MEA-AAS degree and the generalist MEA-TC degree lead to certifi- 
cation as a medical assistant. Students graduating with a specialty TC are not eligible to sit for the Certified 
Medical Assistant (CMA) exam. 



87 



Technical Certificate 



Medical Office Insurance and Coding Specialty 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 30 credits. 

General Education Core 

xxx xxx English/Communications Elective 

xxx xxx Math/Hum/Soc/Physical Science Elective 

(MAT 111 Algebra is recommended) 



6 credits 

3 
3 



Technical Core 

HHS 101 

Specialty Core 

HHS 105 
MEA 136 



Medical Terminology 



Medical Law and Ethics 
Office Administration with 
Computer Applications 



Regionally determined courses 

MEA 137 Medical Insurance and Basic Coding with 

Computer Applications 
MEA 203 Disease Conditions 

MEA 213 Advanced Insurance Coding 

MEA 215 Advanced Medical Terminology 

MEA xxx Medical Assisting Elective 



3 credits 

3 

6 credits 

3 
3 



15 credits 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 



There are other courses that will aid in gaining skills in this area. These courses are optional and do not count 
toward the degree requirements for this certificate. These courses would count towards the next higher level of the 
medical assisting program should you choose to further your education in the field. Please check with the program 
chair for further information. Students are also encouraged to complete the optional externship for this certificate; 
although it is not required it could be helpful in gaining employment in the field upon graduation. Externships are 
an excellent way to gain experience in the field. 

Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist MEA-AAS degree and the generalist MEA-TC degree lead to certifi- 
cation as a medical assistant. Students graduating with a specialty TC are not eligible to sit for the Certified 
Medical Assistant (CMA) exam. 



88 



Technical Certificate 



Pharmacy Technician Specialty 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 32 credits. 



General E 


ducal 


ion C 


ore 


6 credits 


XXX 




XXX 


English/Communications Elective 


3 


XXX 




XXX 


Math/Hum/Soc/Physical Science Elective 


3 


(MAT 111 


is recommended) 




Technical Core 






3 credits 


HHS 




101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


Generalist 


Spec 


ialty Core 


23 credits 


ANP 




101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


ANP 




102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


MEA 




136 


Office Administration with Computer Applications 


3 


HHS 




105 


Medical Law and Ethics 


3 


MEA 




113 


Pharmacology 


3 


MEA 




151 


Pharmacy Technician I 


3 


MEA 




152 


Pharmacy Technician II 


3 


MEA 




154 


Pharmacy Externship 


2 






Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist ME A-AAS degree and the generalist MEA-TC degree lead to certifi- 
cation as a Medical Assistant Students graduating with a specialty TC ARE NOT eligible to sit for the Certified 
Medical Assistant (CMA) exam. 

Students graduating with the pharmacy technician specialty TC are eligible to become certified as a pharmacy tech- 
nician. To obtain certification, the student must successfully complete all course requirements above and successful- 
ly complete the certification exam. Please see the program chair for more information. 



CD 

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89 



Technical Certificate 



Medical Office Transcription Specialty 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 30 credits. 



General Education Core 

xxx xxx English/Communications Elective 

(HEW 101 English Composition I is recommended) 

xxx xxx Math/Hum/Soc/Physical Science Elective 



6 credits 

3 



Technical Core 

HHS 101 



Medical Terminology 



3 credits 

3 



Specialty Core 

HHS 105 
MEA 136 



Medical Law and Ethics 
Office Administration with 
Computer Applications 



6 credits 

3 
3 



Regionally determined courses 

MEA 113 Pharmacology 

MEA 135 Medical Word Processing/Transcription 

MEA 203 Disease Conditions 

MEA 235 Advanced Transcription 

MEA xxx Medical Assisting Elective 



15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



There are other courses that will aid in gaining skills in this area. These courses are optional and do not count 
toward the degree requirements for this certificate. These courses would count towards the next higher level of the 
medical assisting program should you choose to further your education in the field. Please check with the program 
chair for further information. Students are also encouraged to complete the optional externship for this certificate; 
although it is not required it could be helpful in gaining employment in the field upon graduation. Externships are 
an excellent way to gain experience in the field. 

Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist MEA-AAS degree and the generalist MEA-TC degree lead to certifi- 
cation as a medical assistant. Students graduating with a specialty TC are not eligible to sit for the Certified 
Medical Assistant (CMA) exam. 



90 



Technical Certificate 



Phlebotomy Specialty 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 30 credits. 

General Education Core 

xxx xxx English/Communications Elective 

(HSS 148 Interpersonal Communications is recommended) 
xxx xxx Math/Hum/Soc/Physical Science Elective 

(APS 142 General Psychology or a lab science class is recommended) 



Technical Core 

HHS 101 

Specialty Core 

ANP 101 

ANP 102 



Medical Terminology 



Anatomy and Physiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 



Regionally determined courses 

MEA 113 Pharmacology 

MEA 114 Medical Assisting Lab Techniques 

MEA 203 Disease Conditions 

MEA 212 Phlebotomy 

MEA xxx Medical Assisting Elective 



6 credits 

3 



3 credits 



6 credits 

3 
3 

15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



There are other courses that will aid in gaining skills in this area. These courses are optional and do not count 
toward the degree requirements for this certificate. These courses would count towards the next higher level of the 
medical assisting program should you choose to further your education in the field. Please check with the program 
chair for further information. Students are also encouraged to complete the optional externship for this certificate; 
although it is not required it could be helpful in gaining employment in the field upon graduation. Externships are 
an excellent way to gain experience in the field. 

There are first aid and CPR certification requirements for this TC-please see the program chair for further infor- 
mation. 

Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist ME A-A AS degree and the generalist MEA-TC degree lead to certifi- 
cation as a medical assistant. Students graduating with a specialty TC are not eligible to sit for the Certified 
Medical Assistant (CMA) exam. 

Students graduating with the Phlebotomy Specialty TC are eligible to become certified as a phlebotomist. To obtain 
certification, the student must complete the required externship hours in addition to the courses listed above and 
successfully complete the certification exam. Please see the program chair for more information. 



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CD 

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91 



Career Development Certificate 
Medical Office EKG Specialty 

To receive this certificate, you must earn 15 credits. 

Required Courses 15 credits 

HHS 101 Medical Terminology 3 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 

MEA 113 Pharmacology 3 

MEA 209 Basic EKG and Interpretation 3 

MEA 212 Phlebotomy 3 

There are other courses that will aid in gaining skills in this area. These courses are optional and do not count 
toward the degree requirements for this certificate. These courses would count towards the next higher level of the 
medical assisting program should you choose to further your education in the field. Please check with the program 
chair for further information. 

There are first aid and CPR certification requirements for this CDC-please see the program chair for further infor- 
mation. 

Please keep in mind that ONLY the generalist MEA-AAS degree and the generalist MEA-TC degree lead to certifi- 
cation as a medical assistant. Students completing a CDC are not eligible to sit for the Certified Medical Assistant 
(CMA) exam. 



92 



Electtves 



Clinical Electives 


ADP 


805 


ANP 


201 


SIL 


211 


SIC 


101 


PAR 


102 


RAD 


103 


RAD 


107 


RAD 


288 


Administrative Electives 


ACC 


101 


ACC 


105 


ACC 


107 


ACC 


114 


ACC 


222 


AOT 


103 


AOT 


116 


AOT 


119 


AOT 


202 


AOT 


207 


AOT 


212 


AOT 


214 


AOT 


220 


AOT 


221 


BUS 


101 


BUS 


102 


BUS 


105 


BUS 


202 


BUS 


204 


BUS 


208 


BUS 


210 


CIS 


101 


CIS 


102 


CIS 


106 


CIS 


113 


CIS 


115 


CIS 


202 


HSS 


101 


AEC 


101 


HEW 


102 


HEW 


108 


HHS 


106 


LEG 


106 


MKT 


101 



Nurse Aide Procedure and Practice 
Advanced Physiology 
Micro for Health Professionals I 
Chemistry I 
EMT-Basic Training 
Radiographic Positioning I 
Radiation Physics 
Pharmacology and Routines 
of Radiologic Technologists 



Accounting I 

Income Tax I 

Accounting for Record Keeping 

Payroll Accounting Lab 

Accounting Software Applications 

Information/Word Processing Concepts 

Business Communications 

Document Production 

Information/Word Processing Applications 

Office Automation Applications 

Micro Word Processing 

Desktop Publishing 

Document Management 

Office Management and Procedures 

Introduction to Business 

Business Law 

Principles of Management 

Human Resource Management 

Case Problems in Management 

Organizational Behavior 

Managerial Finance 

Introduction to Microcomputers 

Data Processing Fundamentals 

Microcomputer Operating Systems 

Logic, Design and Program 

Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 

Data Communications 

Speech 

Elements of Economics 

English Composition II 

Technical Writing 

Technical Writing 

Claims Investigation 

Principles of Marketing 



3 

4 

4 

3 

7.5 

3 

3 



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93 



Medical Assisting Admissions Procedure 

In order to be admitted to the Medical Assisting Program, you MUST meet the following conditions: 

Step 1 See the health counselor in admissions to begin the process of being admitted to Ivy Tech. 

Step 2 Based on your placement testing you must complete any basic skills courses that you are required to take. 
This includes 

Reading Writing Math 

ENG 03 1 ENG 024 See Step 3 

ENG 032 ENG 025 

Step 3 ALL Medical Assisting students MUST complete MAT 044 BEFORE taking any MEA courses (if your testing indi- 
cates this). AAS students may take MAT 050 before OR during the first semester of the program (if your testing indicates 
this). 

Step 4 Students are strongly advised to take BIO 065 for the following situations: 

*you have never taken a science class before or you don't like science 

*you only took one science class in high school 

*you have failed a previous science class 

*you have been out of school for more than 5 years 
Please note that BIO 065 is NOT REQUIRED. You do NOT HAVE to take it. If you choose to take it, the credits DO 
NOT count toward the Medical Assisting certificate or degree. It is a refresher course ONLY to HELP to PREPARE stu- 
dents for ANP I and ANP II as these are difficult courses. 

In summary, you MUST complete ALL BASIC SKILLS courses that you are required to take or are choosing to take 

BEFORE you are admitted to the Medical Assisting program and BEFORE you may begin taking MEA courses! Again, 

these courses include: 

ENG 024 

ENG 025 

ENG 031 

ENG 032 

MAT 044 

MAT 050. ...may be taken in the first semester of the AAS program 

BIO 065 if you choose to take it.. .must be done prior to ANP I 

These 3 HHS courses may be taken with the basic skills if you choose courses prior to program admission if you choose: 
HHS 101 Medical Terminology 
HHS 105 Medical Law and Ethics 
MEA 102 First Aid/CPR 

Step 5 All Medical Assisting candidates MUST complete ANP 101 with a C or better no later than the first semester of the 
program. All Basic Skills courses must be completed before taking ANP 101. When you are ready to register for ANP 101 
you will register with the program chair. Please make an appointment with the program chair during EARLY REGISTRA- 
TION for the semester you wish to take ANP 101. If you do not do this during early registration, you will probably NOT 
get into an ANP 101 section of your choosing as they close quickly. This could delay your program admission one semes- 
ter. You will be registered, complete a letter of intent for program admission and take the typing test at this time. All stu- 
dents must have a C or better in ALL coursework to be admitted to the program. This program does not have competitive 
entry. If you have met all of the above requirements you WILL be admitted to the program. You may begin in any semes- 
ter. Once you begin taking MEA courses your registration for future semesters will be handled during one of your MEA 
courses. 

Once you have completed steps 1-5 you will need to make an appointment with the program chair-Lori Andrews- at 921- 
4589. This should be done during EARLY REGISTRATION of the semester you are taking ANP 101. (The semester fol- 
lowing step 5) During this appointment with the program chair you will "map out" a timeline for taking all of your MEA 
courses through graduation. You will find out when you will graduate (if you complete all of the courses as scheduled) and 
when you will take the CMA exam. You will also be given a brief overview of the program with information about uni- 
forms, costs, clinical assignments and courses in the program. 

94 



STUDENT ADVISING WORKSHEET 



MEDICAL ASSISTANT TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE GENERALIST 


PREREQUISITES 


SEMESTER 
OFFERED 


CLASS 


CR 


COURSE* 


**SEE BELOW 


EVERY 


ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 


3 


ANP101 


** 


EVERY 


ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 


3 


ANP102 


** 


EVERY 


ENGLISH COMPOSITION 


3 


HEW 101 


** 


EVERY 


INTRO TO INTERPERSONAL 
COMMUNICATION 


3 


HSS 148 


NONE 


EVERY 


MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 


3 


HHS 101 


NONE 


EVERY 


MEDICAL LAW AND ETHICS 


3 


HHS 105 


NONE 


*** 


FIRST AID AND CPR 


2 


MEA102 


HHS101 


FALL 


MED INS & CODING/COMP APPL 


3 


MEA 137* 


CO-MEA 


FALL 


CLINICAL I 


3 


MEA 138* 


139/HHS101 










HHS101 


FALL 


CLINICAL II 


3 


MEA 139* 


HHS101/ANP101 


SPRING 


MEDICAL ASST/LAB TECHNIQUES 


3 


MEA 114* 


HHS101/ANP101 


SPRING 


PHARMACOLOGY 


3 


MEA 113* 


ALLBSA 


SPRING 


MED FINANCIAL MGT/COMPT APPL 


3 


MEA 131 


PCAPP 


SPR/SUM 


MEDICAL ASSTNG/CLINICAL EXTERN 


3 


MEA 120 


PCAPP 


SPR/SUM 


MEDICAL ASSTNG/ADMINISTRAnVE 


3 


MEA 121 


CO-MEA 120 




EXTERN 






ADM TO PROG 


SUMMER 


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION/COMPT APPL 


3 


MEA 136 


HHS101/TYPE@ 


SUMMER 


MEDICAL WORD 


3 


MEA 135 


30WPM 5 ERRORS 




PROCESSING/TRANSCRIPTION 






FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREE ADD THE FOLLOWING: 






HHS101/ANP 101 


FALL 


DISEASE CONDITIONS 


3 


MEA 203 


ALL BSA MATH 


EVERY 


MATH ELECTIVE 


3 


MAT 111 


** 


EVERY 


HUMANITY ELECTIVE 
(PSY, SOC,POL, HUM) 


3 


APS 142 


SEE PC. 


EVERY 


ADMINISTRATIVE ELECTIVE 


3 




SEE PC. 


EVERY 


CLINICAL ELECTIVE 


3 


MEA 212 



* To be taken towards end of program, if questions check with Program Chair 
** See general education course requirements. 
***Scheduled multiple times-check with Program Chair 

Notes: Complete all Basic Skills courses with a C or better prior to program admission 

ANP 101 must be completed with a C or better before/during first semester of program 

You must have a C or better in ALL coursework 

You must complete a letter of intent for program admission 

Students with GPA's less than 2.0 may only register for 6 credit hours 

You must pass a typing test @ 30 wpm 5 errors for program admission 

Registration occurs during the beginning of 
March for the summer semester 
June for the fall semester 
October for the spring semester 



3 
m 



95 



Letter of Intent for Program Admission 

This is a notice of intent for the following student to enter the Medical Assisting Program. This notice of intent should be 
on file in the program office with the program chair before registration begins for the semester you will take ANP 101, 
which is one semester prior to admission. Complete and sign this letter of intent and the admissions checklist. 

Name: 



Address: 



City/State/Zip: 



Home Phone: 



Work Phone: 



Student ID Number: 



E-Mail Address: 



Other Contact Number: 



I wish to be considered for admission to the Medical Assisting Program next semester 
Summer Fall Spring -of 20 



Student Signature/Date: 



Program Chair Signature/Date: 



96 



Admissions Checklist for Medical Assisting 



1 . See a health admissions counselor for the following: 

Ivy Tech application 

high school transcripts 

other college transcripts 

placement testing 



complete all Basic Skills courses with a C or better 

CO 

2. Coordinate with the Medical Assisting program chair: 
complete ANP 101 with a C or better 

complete the notice of intent on the other side of this form 

t ake and pass the typing test with 30 wpm 5 errors 

CD 

3. Make your admissions appointment with the program chair when this form is complete! 



Welcome to the Medical Assisting Program. 






FYl-Registration occurs during the beginning of 
March for the summer semester 

June for the fall semester £"J 

October for the spring semester 



Student Signature/Date:_ 



Program Chair Signature/Date: 



MRP 

3 

CA 



97 



Limited General Radiology Career Development Certificate 

A series of six courses are required to become eligible to sit for the Limited General Radiography 
examination offered by the Indiana State Department of Health. Upon successful completion of cours- 
es a certificate is awarded. Graduates can work in physicians offices and clinics plus the various emer- 
gency care centers located outside of a hospital setting. The total amount of time required will be at 
least 165 classroom hours, including laboratory practice, and at least 920 hours of clinical experience. 

A student who later wishes to be admitted to the associate degree program in Radiologic Technology 
may transfer courses from the Limited General Radiography program, provided a grade of "C" or bet- 
ter was achieved. The student would have to meet all admission requirements to the associate degree 
program, including completion of the prerequisite (general and technical core) courses. 

Prerequisites for applicants to Limited General Radiography 

1. Be 18 years of age 

2. Have a high school diploma or GED 

3. Demonstrate 12th grade reading, writing, and math ability 

4. Be employed full-time in a facility that has x-ray equipment and will agree to serve as a clinical site 

5. Demonstrate knowledge of general anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology by either a grade 
of "C" or better in accredited courses or submitted documentation of the applicant's title as an LPN, 
RN or Medical Assistant. 



Required Courses 








Course # 


Title 


Semester 


Hrs/Credit 


RAD 288-1 


Orientation Nursing/X-Ray 


Summer 


4 


RAD 288-2 


Radiation Physics 


Fall 


3 


RAD 288-3 


Radiographic Positioning I 


Fall 


3 


RAD 288-4 


Radiographic Exposure 


Spring 


2 


RAD 288-5 


Radiographic Positioning II 


Summer 


3 


RAD 288-6 


Limited General Exam Review 


Spring 


3 



Clinical sites must have: 

1 . Current x-ray machine registration 

2. X-ray equipment that is appropriate or not in violation of 410 LAC 5 (current 
regulations) 

3. A physician who will serve as the student's sponsor and sign an agreement to 
document this relationship 

Handout Disclaimer 

This handout is intended to supply accurate information to the reader based on the current practices for the Limited 

General Radiography courses. The reader is encouraged to remain current and informed about the practices in effect. 

The handout and its provision are not in any way a contract or agreement between the applicants and Ivy Tech State College. 



98 



Qualified Medicine Aide (ADP 806) 

Nurse Aide Procedures and Practicum Course (ADP 805) 

Phlebotomy (MEA212) 

Nurse Aide 

Nurse Aide Procedures and Practicum is a three-credit course which lasts for eight weeks. Students are 

in class four hours per week for eight weeks. After 16 hours of class, they also go to nursing homes to f^ 

complete a 75-hour practicum. This is arranged with an assigned nursing home. At the end of the 

eight-week course and the 75-hour practicum, the students take the state-approved final examination 

with a state testing agency. A certificate is awarded, and the students' information is submitted to the 

Indiana State Department of Health. Students must attend all classes. 

Qualified students must be able to read, write, and do simple math problems, and be able to do the 
physical work required of a nurse aide. A physical examination will be required and must be complet- 
ed before starting practicum. Students must furnish a uniform. Payment must be made when regis- 
tering. 

For dates and times, see the Community College of Indiana - Central Indiana class schedule. 

Qualified Medicine Aide H i 

Qualified Medicine Aide (QMA) is a four-credit course offered three hours a week for 16 weeks. 
Students are required to complete a 20-hour practicum, or hands-on work experience in an extended 
care facility (nursing home) after completing the classroom work. The student is expected to be 
employed by a facility that will allow them to do the 20-hour practicum. After successfully completing 
the course, the student is eligible to sit for the State Examination, which costs $20 and is arranged with 
Professional Resources. 

In the first week of class, applicants must bring their high school diploma or GED scores, demonstrate 
that they are currently on the Indiana State Nurse Aid Registry, and have documentation on letterhead 
of three months experience as a CNA in a long-term care facility. 

For dates and times, see the Community College of Indiana - Central Indiana class schedule. CS 



For more information on these classes, contact Lana Anderson at 921-4561 or ljanders@ivytech.edu. 






m 



99 



Phlebotomy (MEA212) 



Twenty seats are available in each class. All classes are held 
in North Meridian Center Room 534. This three-credit- 
hour course includes lecture over the circulatory system 
and the proper technique to draw blood from patients as 
well as safety measures to protect yourself and the patient. 
Students will practice venipuncture on the artificial arm 
several times to acquire the appropriate skills. All stu- 
dents are also expected to be a "patient" and allow fel- 
low classmates to draw blood from them as a vital ele- 
ment of this course. Students are asked to contact the 
instructor if they have a valid medical reason why they 
cannot have their blood drawn. It is recommended stu- 
dents have a high school diploma or GED. Students must 
be 18 years of age. 

Attendance 

A considerable amount of information is presented in each 
class meeting. Due to the large percentage of hands-on 
skills, attendance is strictly monitored. 

Supplies 

Students can find the required text in the Ivy Tech 
Bookstore. Students also are required to wear a lab 
jacket/coat in the classroom. 



Estimated cost 

Course fee 

Textbook, plus tax 

Supply fee to be paid at bookstore 



$221.40 
$52.03 
$60.00 



To register 

1. Complete a registration form. See enclosed dates for reg- 
istration. Select the course section (day and time) you 
prefer. 

2. An advisor signs the registration form. 

3. Payment must be made at time of registration. 



The Community College of Indiana does not guarantee 
employment after training, but you may use the Career and 
Employment Services office to apply for a job. The average 
pay for phlebotomists (those who draw blood samples from 
patients in labs or hospitals) ranges from $8 to $10 and up 
per hour, depending upon the shift hours and type of facility 
(office, lab, hospital). 

This course DOES NOT make you eligible for certification 
as a phlebotomist. A national certification test requires you 
show proof of a specific number and type of venipunctures. 
Your instructor can provide you with information about 
achieving national certification. At present, the college is 
able to provide clinical rotation for this course on a limited 
basis. 

Many students take this course because they hope to be 
employed in a health care facility to draw blood. Presently, 
most hospitals are not hiring basic phlebotomists; they are 
retraining existing personnel to draw blood. This is due to 
the current budget curtailments in all health facilities. We 
urge all health 

students to take this course as part of their training to be 
prepared for entering many different employment situations. 
Nurses especially can benefit from taking this course. 
Employers sometimes hire graduates of this course without 
demanding extensive experience. The Regional Blood 
Center and many of the plasma centers may hire persons 
familiar with venipunture. Insurance companies need per- 
sons to visit the homes of clients to obtain blood samples 
for screening; home health agencies may also employ phle- 
botomists to obtain samples from home-bound patients who 
need frequent blood tests. 

The college wants you to be aware of the current employ- 
ment opportunities before you decide to enroll in this 
course. 



Placement 

For more information on these classes, contact Lana Anderson at 921-4561 or ljanders@ivytech.edu. 



100 



Nursing 



The Community College of Indiana offers a two-year generic Associate of Science (AS) nursing pro- 
gram. The program is also accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. 
Graduates are eligible to write the NCLEX-RN examination to become registered nurses. This pro- 
gram accommodates both students interested in nursing as a career and licensed practical nurses 
choosing to continue their nursing education. 

Admission Criteria For College Admission 

Certificate of high school graduation or GED; SAT or ACT scores or college assessment 

For ASN Admission 

NET Exam: Educational Resources Inc. 

For all nursing students 

Physical health form and immunizations completed prior to registration for any clinical course. 

Students who plan to transfer to the bachelor of science program in the Indiana University School of 
Nursing program at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI) upon graduation 
should plan also to take SIL 212, General Microbiology II. 



Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Policy 

Ivy Tech State College provides open admission, degree credit programs, courses and community 
service offerings, and student support services for all persons regardless of race, color, creed, national 
origin, religion, sex, physical or mental disability, age or veteran status. The college also provides 
opportunities to students on the same non-discriminatory opportunity basis. Persons who believe they 
may have been (hscriminated against should contact the campus affirmative action officer, Director of 
Human Resources, or Dean of Student Affairs. 

Disclaimer 



€15 

3 

o 



i. . ■ « 

3 



This booklet is intended to supply accurate information to the reader. The college reserves the right to 
change the Program and course requirements; however, every effort will be made to inform students 
of any program changes. This handout and its provisions are not in any way a contract between an 
applicant and the college. 



101 



Introduction 

This information introduces you to the Associate in Science in Nursing (ASN) Program at Ivy Tech State College in 
Indianapolis. As the year 2000 marked the beginning of a new millennium, so the turn of the century heralds a new era for 
the Indianapolis campus of Ivy Tech State College. The Indianapolis campus received its charter on June 20, 1967. 
Classes were first offered in 1968. Enrollment growth has been consistently positive with headcount reaching approxi- 
mately 11,000 for the 2001-2002 school year. 



History 

The Central Indiana campus of Ivy Tech State College (formerly Indiana Vocational Technical College) was approved for a 
generic/traditional Associate of Science in Nursing Program in February of 1991. The Indiana State Board of Nursing 
approved the program in June 1991. This nursing program, which is strongly supported by all of the hospitals and extend- 
ed care facilities in the geographic region, offers a nursing curriculum at the registered nurse level to non-nurses and 
advanced placement for licensed practical nurses who desire to further their nursing education. 



Purpose 

The purpose of the program is to provide associate degree nursing education for the non-nurse and career mobility for the 
LPN. Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate is eligible to apply to take the NCLEX-RN examination 
which is required to obtain state licensure as a registered nurse. 

The faculty believe education of associate degree nurses should be placed in institutions of higher learning. While the the- 
oretical component of nursing education takes place at the college, clinical practice, an essential part of nursing education, 
takes place in the health care setting under the supervision and direction of professional nurse educators. Nursing students 
have the educational opportunities and auxiliary services of the college offered to all members of the student body. 

Teaching Facilities 

All facilities and resources of Ivy Tech State College in Indianapolis are available to nursing students. Students make use 
of the college library, the open computer lab, the Learning Resource Center, student services, and other academic services. 
All courses are taught by faculty with advanced degrees in the appropriate fields of study 



102 



Associate of Science in Nursing 
Clinical Facilities 

Clinical experience is an integral part of the educational experience for all nursing students. The ASN program has affili- 
ation agreements with a wide range of agencies to provide student-learning experiences. Agencies utilized include but are 
not limited to Clarian Health Partners, Inc., St. Francis Hospitals, Wishard Memorial Hospital, VA Hospital, Winona 
Memorial Hospital, Kindred Care Hospital, St. Vincent's Hospitals, Brownsburg Nursing Home and Lockfield Village. 



£» 



Admission 

It is important to understand that your admission to the college is separate from your admission into the ASN Program. 
After you meet the program admission criteria, you must remain in good academic standing so you can register for 
required program-level courses and become clinically eligible to continue in the ASN program. You also need to under- 
stand that the employers and not the college control the clinical settings and who is permitted to use them. 

Admission Steps for ASN Program 
I. Admission/Selection 

A. Admission 

Admission to the college and the program follow statewide policy.(l.lSAP-ADMISSIONS) 

CB 

A. NUR program applicants must take the Nursing Entrance Test (NET). 

Applicants must score 60% on Essential Math Skills and Reading — ^ 

Comprehension components of the NET test. 

The NET may be taken two (2) times using Forms "A" and "B" provided there 

is at least 90 days between the testings. Scores will stand for two (2) years. 

B. LPN-to-ASN Transitional Track applicants must also provide the following 
documentation. 

- Current Indiana Practical Nursing license. 

- Official transcript of the Practical Nursing program. 

- Official documentation of successful completion of the 15-19 credit hours 
of first-level general education courses: 



ANP101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


ANP102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 




OR 


ANP203 


Human Anatomy and Physiology I 


ANP204 


Human Anatomy and Physiology II 




AND 


HEW 101 


English Composition 


APS 142 


Introduction to Psychology 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 



(The ASN faculty also recommend that the student complete the Microbiology course requirement prior to the beginning 
of the second level of the ASN program). 

(A 



103 



Selection of applicants will be made utilizing the following point system. 
1 . NET testing composite percentage score (average of Essential Math Skills 

and Reading Comprehension scores) 



NET COMPOSITE SCORE: 


POINTS 


60-70% 


10 points 


71-80% 


20 points 


81-90% 


30 points 


91-100% 


40 points 



2. If there is a greater number of eligible applicants than there are clinical spots available, 
the grades of required general education courses completed will be considered utilizing 
the following scale: 

SCIENCE/MATH COURSES: (Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry, Microbiology 

and Intermediate Algebra) 
GRADE: POINTS 

A 6 points 

B 4 points 

C 2 points 

NON/SCIENCE/NON-MATH COURSES: (English Composition, Psychology, 

Public Speaking, and Microcomputers) 
GRADE: POINTS 

A 3 points 

B 2 points 

C 1 point 

3. Applicants will be rank ordered and offered admission to the program based on the 
number of available clinical spots. 

4. Successful completion of the general education courses does not imply admission into 
the ASN Program. 

5. Consistent with Indiana State Board of Nursing requirements, an official high school 
transcript from a state-approved high school or its equivalent, or original GED test 
scores must be on file. 

11 Acceptance Time Line 

Files are reviewed according to the following time line: 

2-YEAR LPN-to ASN 

December 1st December 1st Deadline to receive completed files. 

January 15th January 15th All files reviewed and applicants chosen to complete 

. . the class roster. 

February 1st February 1st Acceptance letters sent to new class members. 

Successful completion of general education courses does not imply admission to the Associate of Science in Nursing 
Program. 



104 



The opportunity is provided for students to test-out of general education courses. CLEP exams will be accepted for 
Introductory Psychology, Human Growth and Development, English Composition, and Intermediate Algebra. 

Minimum exam scores have been set by the college. They are 

College Algebra 50 

Introduction Psychology 50 

Human G&D 50 

English Composition without Essay 50 

Students may also take the ACT-PEP exam for Anatomy and Physiology credit. Successful completion of the exam with a 
score of 45 or higher yields six hours of transferable credit. Students who utilize this option must complete the Anatomy 
and Physiology requirement by taking ANP 201 (Advanced Physiology) at Ivy Tech State College. Students interested in 
the ACT-PEP test-out program may contact the company by calling (888) 723-9267. Request the location and date for test 
number 506 (Anatomy and Physiology). 

Reapplication Process 

Students who are not selected for the program may reapply for the next class. Letters requesting reconsideration (for the 
next class) are due each year by September 1st . Students who are reapplying will be added to the current population seek- 
ing admission to the program. 






C9 



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105 



Associate of Science 

To receive this degree, you must earn 68 credits. 

28 credits 

Anatomy and Physiology I 3 

Anatomy and Physiology II 3 

Microbiology for Health Professionals 3 
Speech OR 

Interpersonal Communication 3 

English Composition 3 

Intermediate Algebra 3 

General Psychology 3 

Advanced Human Physiology 4 

Developmental Psychology 3 

40 credits 

Nursing and Universal Needs 4 

Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum 4 

Nursing Related to Health Deviation I 5 

Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum 5 

Pharmacotherapeutics 2 

Nursing Related to Health Deviation II 5 

Nursing Related to Health Deviation II Practicum 5 

Nursing Related to Developmental Needs 4 

Nursing Related to Developmental Needs Practicum 4 

Professional Nursing Issues 2 

Transition to ASN Nursing 5 



General Education Core 


ANP 


101 


ANP 


102 


SIL 


211 


HSS 


143 


HSS 


148 


HEW 


101 


MAT 


111 


APS 


142 


ANP 


201 


APS 


201 


Technical Core 




NUR 


150 


NUR 


151 


NUR 


152 


NUR 


153 


NUR 


154 


NUR 


250 


NUR 


251 


NUR 


252 


NUR 


253 


NUR 


254 


*NUR 


248 



*Course specifically geared toward students enrolled in the LPN-to-ASN completion option. Successful completion of this 
course with a grade of "C" or better allows verification of credit applied toward the 100-level NUR courses. 



106 



CURRICULUM PLANS 

TRADITIONAL STUDENT 

(2 YEAR STUDENT) 



SEMESTER I 


< 


ANP101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


HEW 101 


English Composition 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


NUR150 


Nursing and Universal Needs 


NUR151 


Nursing and Universal Needs 




Practicum 


NUR154 


Pharmacotherapeutics 


SEMESTER H 




ANP102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


APS 142 


Introduction to Psychology 


NUR152 


Nursing related to Health Deviation I 


NUR153 


Nursing related to Health Deviation I 




Practicum 


SEMESTER DT 


HSS 148 


Interpersonal Communications OR 


HSS 143 


Speech 


ANP201 


Advanced Physiology 


*NUR250 


Nursing Related to Health Deviation II 


♦NUR251 


Nursing Related to Health Deviation II 




Practicum 


SEMESTER IV 


SIL211 


General Microbiology 


APS 201 


Life Span Development 


♦NUR252 


Nursing Related to Development Needs 


*NUR253 


Nursing Related to Development Needs 




Practicum 


NUR254 


Professional Nursing Issues 



ASN PROGRAM 






CONTACT HRS 


CREDITS 


PER WEEK 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


10 



* NUR 250/251 and NUR 252/253 course sequences are offered each semester. 
Student schedule may reflect this flexibility. 



4 
3 
5 

15 



3 
3 
5 
5 

15 



5 
3 
4 

12 



o 



»■», 



as 

mm 

m 



107 



ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


APS 142 


Introduction to Psychology 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


HEW 101 


English Composition 



CURRICULUM PLANS 




TRANSITIONAL STUDENT 




( LPN STUDENT) 




ASN PROGRAM 






CONTACT HRS 


CREDITS 


PER WEEK 


3 


4 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



SEMESTER U 

NUR 248 Transition to ASN Nursing 5 

**NUR 154 Pharmacotherapeutics 2 

**MAY BE required if pharmacology was not a part of the PN curriculum. 



SEMESTER D3 

HSS 148 Interpersonal Communications OR 

HSS 143 Speech 

ANP 201 Advanced Physiology 

*NUR 250 Nursing related to Health Deviation II 

*NUR 25 1 Nursing related to Health Deviation II 

Practicum 

SEMESTER IV 

SEL 211 General Microbiology 

APS 201 Life Span Development 

*NUR 252 Nursing related to Development Needs 

*NUR 253 Nursing related to Development Needs 

Practicum 
NUR 254 Professional Nursing Issues 



3 
3 

5 
5 

15 



5 
3 
4 
12 



NUR 250/251 and NUR 252/253 course sequences are offered each semester. Student schedule may reflect this flexibili- 



ty- 



108 



TERMINAL PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

Upon completion of the program, the graduate will be able to: 

1 . Relate the impact of universal, developmental and health deviation needs on the health and maturation of 
the client. 

2. Analyze the relationships of cultural and spiritual implications, biopsychosocial facts, concepts and 
principles in assisting clients to meet needs. 

3. Integrate the nursing process into the delivery of competent nursing care. 

4. Design individualized teaching plans collaboratively with client(s) and their support persons to meet 

health needs. CD 

5. Employ advanced communication techniques in interacting appropriately with clients, their support 
persons, and members of the health care delivery system. 

6. Manage care collaboratively for groups of assigned clients to meet identified client needs. 



7. Function within the scope of practice of the associate degree nurse. 



Terminal Program Outcomes 

1 . Graduation Rate: Seventy percent (70%) will graduate within 4 years of admission to the program for 
the generic students, or within 2 years of admission for the transition student. 

2. Pass rate: Ninety percent (90%) of graduates will pass NCLEX-RN exam upon the first writing. 

3. Employment rate: Eighty-five percent (85%) will be employed within 6 months of graduation. 



€0 



Evaluate personal effectiveness in fulfilling the role of the associate degree nurse, demonstrating 
responsibility and accountability for professional growth, personal growth and nursing actions. 



o 



Disability Services Information 

Students who request accommodations are expected to participate in an intake interview with Disability Services if request- 
ing specific services, academic adjustments or other accommodations for a disability. Prospective students should schedule 
an intake interview prior to attempting any part of the admission process if accommodations will be required for the infor- 
mation session, academic assessment, completing forms or scheduling classes. The intake process, including intake inter- 
view and documentation on file, should be completed at least one month prior to the need for accommodations. 
Documentation of the disability must be on file with the Disability Services office prior to services being provided. Late 
requests may delay accommodations. In accordance with the above procedure, federal guidelines and respect for individual 
privacy, no action will be taken without a specific request. 

If you would like more information about the Disabled Student Development program at Ivy Tech State College in 
Indianapolis or would like to schedule an appointment for an intake interview, please contact Special Needs at 921-4982. 

All students are expected to meet entry requirements. Essential elements of courses and programs and licensing require- 
ments relevant to a program curriculum cannot be waived, although they may be reasonably accommodated. If you will 
require assistance during an emergency evacuation, notify your instructor immediately. Look for evacuation procedures 
posted in your classroom. 



109 



Essential Functions of Associate of Science in Nursing Students 

Qualified applicants are expected to meet all admission criteria and matriculating students are expected to meet all pro- 
gression criteria, as well as these essential functions. Students with documented need for accommodations are to meet 
with the campus Disabilities Support Services Representative. 



FUNCTION ABILITY CATEGORY 



REPRESENTATIVE ACTIVITY/ATTRIBUTE 



GROSS MOTOR SKILLS 



FINE MOTOR SKILLS 



PHYSICAL ENDURANCE 



PHYSICAL STRENGTH 



MOBILITY 



Move within confined spaces 

Sit and maintain balance 

Stand and maintain balance 

Reach above shoulders (e.g., IV poles) 

Reach below waist (e.g., plug electrical appliance into wall outlets) 

Pick up objects with hands 

Grasp small objects with hands (e.g., IV tubing, pencil) 

Write with pen or pencil 

Key/type (e.g., use a computer) 

Pinch/pick or otherwise work with fingers (e.g., manipulate a syringe) 

Twist (e.g., turn objects/knobs using hands) 

Squeeze with finger (e.g., eye dropper) 

Stand (e.g., at client side during surgical or therapeutic procedure) 
Sustain repetitive movements (e.g., CPR) 
Maintain physical tolerance (e.g., work entire shift) 

Push and pull 25 pounds (e.g., position clients) 

Support 25 pounds (e.g., ambulate client) 

Lift 25 pounds (e.g., pick up a child, transfer client) 

Move light object weighing up to 10 pounds (e.g., IV poles) 

Move heavy objects weighing from 1 1 to 50 pounds 

Defend self against combative client 

Carry equipment/supplies 

Use upper body strength (e.g., perform CPR physically 

restrain a client) 

Squeeze with hands (e.g., operate fire extinguisher) 

Twist 

Bend 

Stoop/squat 

Move quickly (e.g., response to an emergency) 

Climb (e.g., ladders/stools/stairs) 

Walk 



110 



HEARING 



VISUAL 



TACTILE 



SMELL 

READING 
CRITICAL THINKING 

INTERPERSONAL SKILLS 



Hear normal speaking level sounds (e.g., person-to-person report) 

Hear faint voices 

Hear faint body sounds (e.g., blood pressure sounds, assess 

placement of tubes) 

Hear in situations when not able to see lips (e.g., when masks are used) 

Hear auditory alarms (e.g., monitors, fire alarms, call bells) 

See objects up to 20 inches away (e.g., information on a 

computer screen, skin conditions) 

See objects up to 20 feet away (e.g., client in a room) 

See object more than 20 feet away (e.g., client at end of hall) 

Use depth perception 

Use peripheral vision 

Distinguish color (e.g., color codes on supplies, charts, bed) 

Distinguish color intensity (e.g., flushed skin, skin paleness) 

Feel vibrations (e.g., palpate pulses) 

Detect temperature (e.g., skin solutions) 

Feel differences in surface characteristics (e.g., skin turgor, rashes) 

Feel differences in sizes, shapes (e.g., palpate vein, identify 

body landmarks) 

Detect environment temperature (e.g., check for drafts) 

Detect odors from client (e.g., foul smelling drainage, alcohol 

breath, etc.) 

Detect smoke 

Detect gases or noxious smells 

Read and understand written documents (e.g., policies, protocols) 

Identify cause-effect relationships 
Plan/control activities for others 
Synthesize knowledge and skills 
Sequence information 

Negotiate interpersonal conflict 
Respect differences in clients 
Establish rapport with clients 
Establish rapport with co-workers 






SO 



s 



111 



ARITHMETIC COMPETENCE 



EMOTIONAL STABILITY 



ANALYTICAL THINKING 



COMMUNICATION SKILLS 



Read and understand columns of writing (flow sheet, charts) 

Read digital displays 

Read graphic printouts (e.g., EKG) 

Calibrate equipment 

Convert numbers to and/or from the Metric System 

Read graphs (e.g., vital sign sheets) 

Tell time 

Measure time (e.g., count duration of contractions, etc.) 

Count rates (e.g., drips/minute, pulse) 

Use measuring tools (e.g., thermometer) 

Read measurement marks (e.g., measurement tapes, scales, etc.) 

Add, subtract, multiply, and/or divide whole numbers 

Compute fractions (e.g., medication dosages) 

Use a calculator 

Write number in records 

Establish therapeutic boundaries 

Provide client with emotional support 

Adapt to changing environment/stress 

Deal with the unexpected (e.g., client going bad, crisis) 

Focus attention on task 

Monitor own emotions 

Perform multiple responsibilities concurrently 

Handle strong emotions (e.g., grief) 

Transfer knowledge from one situation to another 

Process information 

Evaluate outcomes 

Problem solve 

Prioritize tasks 

Use long-term memory 

Use short-term memory 

Teach (e.g., client/family about health care) 

Explain procedures 

Give oral reports (e.g., report on client's condition to others) 

Interact with others (e.g., health care workers) 

Speak on the telephone 

Influence people 

Direct activities of others 

Convey information through writing (e.g., progress notes) 



♦Adapted from Validation Study: "Functional Abilities Essential for Nursing Practice," National Council of State Boards 
of Nursing, Inc. 1996. 



112 



« 



Readmission to the Program 

If a student is dismissed from any campus/region of Ivy Tech State College, that individual is dismissed from the college. 

A. For violations of the college rules of conduct: The year starts at the time/date of the official 
notification to the student by the chief administrative officer. After one calendar year, the 
individual under suspension may apply for reinstatement. If the student is dismissed, the 
student may appeal for reinstatement after five years. 

The individual must begin the reinstatement appeal process by informing the chief student 
affairs officer at the campus where the dismissal took place of her/his intentions. The 
appeal for reinstatement may be applied for at any campus/region of Ivy Tech where the 
individual hopes to attend. The campus/region Student Status Committee will act on the 
appeal within thirty (30) days of its receipt. The recommendation of the Student Status 
Committee will be forwarded to the chief administrative officer of the campus/region. That 
individual will render a judgment on the appeal. That judgment will be final. (9.1 SAP - 
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES) 

B. For failure to meet and maintain academic standards: A student who fails to maintain 
satisfactory academic progress will be subject to a series of intervention activities and 
related restrictions until such time as he/she restores satisfactory progress or is dismissed 
as a degree/certificate seeking student due to repeated unsatisfactory progress. 

1 . A student who is dismissed from the NUR program for unsatisfactory academic 
progress faces one term of non-enrollment as a certificate or degree declared student 

prior to resuming progress toward that certificate or degree, at which time re-enrollment Ml 

is allowed on a probationary status. 

2. A student who is dismissed twice for unsatisfactory academic progress will be 
terminated for up to five years as a degree or certificate declared student unless he/she 
chooses to participate in an extensive Basic Skills Advancement program to correct 
academic deficiencies. 

3. Petition for readmission must be initiated at the campus where dismissal occurred via 

the Academic Status Committee. (4.3APPM-DEGREE REQUTREMENTS/GRADUATION) 
The following criteria will be utilized for readmission 

a. There must be space available. 

b. If the number of applicants for readmission exceeds clinical space availability, 
selection will be based on the earliest date of written application for 
readmission. 

c. A readmitted student is subject to the curriculum guidelines and program policies 
in effect at the time of readmission. 

C. For reasons of illness: If a student who is otherwise in good standing has to drop out of a 
program for one semester because of well-documented health reasons, that student will be 
allowed to repeat the course(s) without penalty and that student will not be considered a 
readmit when he/she returns to the program. 



3 



w 



113 



Transfer 

The college encourages articulation between programs offered at each campus and similar programs offered at secondary or 
post-secondary levels. To ensure that articulation between programs at the high school level and Ivy Tech and between Ivy 
Tech and four-year institutions is established on a permanent and educationally sound foundation, formal written articula- 
tion agreements with secondary and/or post-secondary institutions must be developed. 

Local articulation agreements between Ivy Tech campuses and post-secondary institutions and statewide post-secondary 
articulation agreements should include a statement listing all conditions under which the courses or degree programs trans- 
fer. (6.3 APPM-CREDIT TRANSFER/AWARDING) 

The Registrar will accept in transfer any course appearing on the SIS+ transfer list. For courses not appearing on SIS+, 
recommendations for transfer of credit are made by the Department/Program head. Credits to be considered for transfer 
must have been earned at a post-secondary institution accredited by a regional accrediting board, and the student must have 
earned a grade of "C" or better in the course(s) involved. Grades below C- do not transfer. Transferred credit is included 
in earned hours, but does not affect the grade point average. Final authority for transfer credit rests with the chief academic 
officer. Credits taken more than 10 years prior must be reviewed by the chief academic officer if applied to a degree or 
certificate objective. 

This policy applies to credits accepted in transfer from another institution and to credits taken at Ivy Tech prior to declaring 
the new degree or certificate objective to which the credits may apply (4.2APPM-GRADING POLICIES). 

Transfer is on a space available basis. 

Movement within the Ivy Tech system 

Movement within the Ivy Tech State system is based on the following: 

a. Clinical space availability 

b. Written request by the student indicating the desire to complete his/her studies at another campus 

c. Good academic standing with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher 

The student is held harmless in the transfer of co-requisite credit of the General Education courses required region-to- 
region. 



114 



Indiana State Board of Nursing Questions 



The following questions are asked by the Indiana State Board of Nursing in the application to take 
their examination. If you answer "YES" to any of these questions, it is your obligation to resolve this 
situation with the Board. 

> 

1. Has disciplinary action ever been taken regarding any health license, certification, 
registration or permit that you hold or have held? 

YES NO 

2. Have you ever been denied a license, a certificate, registration or permit to practice as a 
nurse or any regulated health occupation in any state (including Indiana) or country? 
YES NO 

CD 

3. Are there charges pending against you regarding a violation of any federal, state or local 
law relating to the use, manufacturing, distribution or dispensing of controlled substance, 

alcohol or other drugs? 
YES NO 

4. Have you ever been convicted of, pled guilty or "nolo contendre" (no contest): 

A. to the manufacturing, distribution, dispensing of controlled substance, alcohol or other 
drugs? 

YES NO 

B. to any offense, misdemeanor or felony in any state? (Except for minor traffic 

violations resulting in fines.) ■■§ 

YES NO 

o 

5. Have you ever been denied staff membership or privileges in any hospital or health care 
facility or had such membership or privilege revoked, suspended or subjected to any 
restrictions, probation or other type of discipline or limitations? 

YES NO -e 

6. Have you ever had a malpractice judgment against you or settled any malpractice action? 
YES NO 

3 



115 



Costs 

The following is an estimate of the cost of the program. The cost is subject to change without notice. 

Credit hour fee Instate: $73.80 Out of state: $148.75 

Books Nursing: $800.00 

General Education: $500.00 

Uniforms, related supplies $200.00 

NCLEX Review, Licensing Fees, Graduation $700.00 

All students must also obtain, at their own expense, a physical examination including a TB test, MMR or Rubella and 
Rubeola Titers, Varivax or varicella(chicken pox) titer , the Hepatitis B vaccine series, CPR certification (Healthcare 
Provider), and transportation to the clinical facilities. 



ACCREDITING BODIES: 

North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 

30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 

Chicago, IL 60602-2504 

Phone: 312-263-0456 



Indiana State Board of Nursing Health Professions Bureau 

402 West Washington Street, Room 041 

Indianapolis, IN 46204 

Phone: 317-232-2690 



National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission 

350 Hudson Street 

New York, NY 46204 

Phone: 212-645-9685 or 1-800-669-9656 

Web site: www.nlnac.org 



116 



Office Administration 






Specialties: 

Administrative 

Legal 

Medical 

Software 

Administrative Assistant (Technical Certificate) 

The Office Administration Program prepares students for an automated office environment. Students 
develop basic office skills and acquire computer skills, including word processing, spreadsheets, data- 
bases, and microcomputer operating systems. Several applications (advanced word processing, desk- 
top publishing, and integrated packages) can also be studied in depth. The Office Administration 
Program is designed to accommodate students with different levels of training experiences. Courses 
are offered which provide initial, advanced, and refresher education and assist individuals in achieving 
professional recognition and career progression. The program offers the Software Specialty, Medical 
Specialty, and Legal Specialty courses of study for the Associate of Applied Science degree. An 
Administrative Assistant Specialty is also offered in the Technical Certificate program of study. 

Students who complete the recommended sequences of courses are eligible to take the Administrative 
Information Processing Specialist (AIPS) or the Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) exams admin- 
istered by the Institute for Certifying Secretaries of the Professional Secretaries International 
Association (PSI). 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 60 credits q 

Associate of Science - 60 credits 
Technical Certificate - 30 credits 



01 

mm 



117 



Associate of Applied Science 



Administrative Specialty 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 Speech 

AEC 100 

HEW 101 

MAT 112 

MAT 111 

SPS 101 

ASO 151 



Elements of Economics 
English Composition I 
Functional Mathematics OR 
Intermediate Algebra 
Physical Science 
Principles of Sociology 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
3 



Technical Core 

ACC 101 

BUS 101 

CIS 101 

OAD 119 

OAD 216 

OAD 221 



Accounting Principles 

Introduction to Business 

Introduction to Microcomputers 

Document Processing 

Business Communications 

Office Administration and Supervision 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Administrative Specialty Core 

OAD 103 Word Processing Applications 

OAD 121 Office Procedures 

OAD 114 Desktop Publishing 

OAD 220 Records and Database Management 



12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



Regionally Determined Core 

OAD 207 Integrated Office Applications 

OAD 219 Advanced Document Processing 



6 credits 

3 
3 



Electives (choose two) 



OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
CIS 



110 
214 
217 
218 
280 
106 



Presentation Graphics 

Multimedia Design 

Computer Operator Problem Solving 

Spreadsheets 

Co-op Internship 

Microcomputer Operating Systems 



6 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



118 



Associate of Applied Science 



Legal Specialty 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 Speech 

AEC 100 

HEW 101 

MAT 112 

MAT 111 

SPS 101 

ASO 151 



Elements of Economics 
English Composition I 
Functional Mathematics OR 
Intermediate Algebra 
Physical Science 
Principles of Sociology 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



3» 



Technical Core 

ACC 101 

BUS 101 

CIS 101 

OAD 119 

OAD 216 

OAD 221 

Legal Specialty Core 

OAD 103 

LEG 101 

LEG 102 

LEG 103 



Accounting Principles 

Introduction to Business 

Introduction to Microcomputers 

Document Processing 

Business Communications 

Office Administration and Supervision 



Word Processing Applications 
Introduction to Paralegal 
Legal Research 
Civil Procedures 



Regionally Determined Core 

OAD 215 Legal Transcription 

OAD 219 Advanced Document Processing 



Electives (choose two) 

OAD 

OAD 

OAD 

OAD 

OAD 

OAD 

OAD 

OAD 



110 
114 
207 
214 
217 
218 
220 
280 



Presentation Graphics 

Desktop Publishing 

Integrated Office Applications 

Multimedia Design 

Computer Operator Problem Solving 

Spreadsheets 

Records and Database Management 

Co-op Internship 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

6 credits 

3 
3 

6 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 






O 

m 
en 



119 



Associate of Applied Science 



Medical Specialty 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General 


Education Cor 


e 


18 credits 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


AEC 


100 


Elements of Economics 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


112 


Functional Mathematics OR 




MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


SPS 


101 


Physical Science 


3 


ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 


3 


Technical Core 




18 credits 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


OAD 


119 


Document Processing 


3 


OAD 


216 


Business Communications 


3 


OAD 


218 


Spreadsheets 


3 


Medical 


Specialty Core 




14 credits 


HHS 


101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


HHS 


105 


Medical Law and Ethics 


3 


MEA 


137 


Medical Insurance/Computer Applications 


3 


MEA 


136 


Medical Office Administration/ 








Computer Applications 


3 


OAD 


121 


Office Procedures 


3 


Regionally Determined Core 


6 credits 


OAD 


207 


Integrated Office Applications 


3 


OAD 


211 


Medical Transcription 


3 


Electives (choose two) 




4 credits 


OAD 


103 


Word Processing Applications 


3 


OAD 


110 


Presentation Graphics 


3 


OAD 


114 


Desktop Publishing 


3 


OAD 


214 


Multimedia Design 


3 


OAD 


217 


Computer Operator Problem Solving 


3 


OAD 


219 


Advanced Document Processing 


3 


OAD 


220 


Records and Database Management 


3 


OAD 


221 


Office Administration & Supervision 


3 


OAD 


280 


Co-op Internship 


3 


MEA 


215 


Advanced Medical Terminology 


3 


CIS 


106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 


HHS 


104 


CPR and Basic Health Awareness 


1 



120 



Associate of Applied Science 



Software Specialty 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 Speech 

AEC 100 

HEW 101 

MAT 112 

MAT 111 

SPS 101 

ASO 151 



Elements of Economics 
English Composition I 
Functional Mathematics OR 
Intermediate Algebra 
Physical Science 
Principles of Sociology 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



Technical Core 

ACC 101 

BUS 101 

CIS 101 

OAD 119 

OAD 216 

OAD 221 



Accounting Principles 

Introduction to Business 

Introduction to Microcomputers 

Document Processing 

Business Communications 

Office Administration and Supervision 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



m 

^ r 

mam 



Software Specialty Core 



OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
OAD 



103 Word Processing Applications 

114 Desktop Publishing 

214 Multimedia Design 

217 Computer Operator Problem Solving 

218 Spreadsheets 



15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



•<.-*» 



Regionally Determined Core 

OAD 207 Integrated Office Applications 



3 credits 

3 



Electives (choose two) 



OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
CIS 



110 
121 
219 
220 
280 
106 



Presentation Graphics 

Office Procedures 

Advanced Document Processing 

Records and Database Management 

Co-op Internship 

Microcomputer Operating Systems 



6 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



mi 

inl 

m 



121 



Associate of Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Educa 


tion Co 


re 


24 credits 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


HS 


148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


AEC 


100 


Elements of Economics 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


APO 


111 


American National Government 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Life/Physical Science 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Social Science Elective 


3 


Technical Core 






33 credits 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


3 


ACC 


102 


Accounting Principles II 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 


102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 


105 


Principles of Management 


3 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


OAD 


103 


Word Processing Applications OR 




OAD 


288 


Microcomputer Word Processing 


3 


OAD 


119 


Document Processing 


3 


OAD 


207 


Integrated Office Applications 


3 


OAD 


220 


Records and Database Management 


3 


OAD 


221 


Office Aclrninistration and Supervision 


3 


Regionally Determined Elecrives (choose one) 


3 credits 


OAD 


216 


Business Communications 


3 


OAD 


110 


Presentation Graphics 


3 


OAD 


114 


Desktop Publishing 


3 


OAD 


214 


Multimedia Design 


3 


OAD 


217 


Computer Operator Problem Solving 


3 


OAD 


218 


Spreadsheets 


3 


OAD 


280 


Co-op Internship 


3 



122 



Technical Certificate 



Administrative Assistant Specialty 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 30 credits. 

General Education Core 

HEW 101 English Composition I 

ASO 151 Principles of Sociology 



Technical Core 

OAD 119 



Document Processing 



Administrative Assistant Specialty Core 

OAD 103 Word Processing Applications 

OAD 121 Office Procedures 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 

Regionally Determined Core 

OAD 207 Integrated Office Applications 

OAD 216 Business Communications 



6 credits 

3 
3 

3 credits 

3 

9 credits 

3 
3 
3 

6 credits 

3 
3 



3> 
fid 

' S:::. 



Elecrives (choose two) 



OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
OAD 
CIS 



110 
214 
217 
218 
280 
106 



Presentation Graphics 

Multimedia Design 

Computer Operator Problem Solving 

Spreadsheets 

Co-op Internship 

Microcomputer Operating Systems 



6 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



■■*», 



S3 

3 



123 



Paralegal 



Recognizing the demand for trained paralegals, Ivy Tech has shaped a curriculum with input from 
attorneys, judges, paralegals, the American Bar Association, and other legal professionals. These advi- 
sors have helped Ivy Tech determine what qualifications are necessary for success in the paralegal 
field. 

Ivy Tech's program produces knowledgeable paralegal professionals ready for an exciting career in 
law firms, the courts, government, corporate legal departments, banks, title companies, insurance com- 
panies, and other businesses. Paralegal duties include drafting pleadings, transactional documents, and 
legal correspondence; interviewing clients and witnesses; doing legal research in the library or on the 
computer; managing trial documents and exhibits; and assisting attorneys in the courtroom. 

Ivy Tech training provides students with the variety of skills necessary to succeed in this career. The 
curriculum emphasizes written and oral communication skills and provides in-class opportunities for 
technical skill development. Courses are taught by attorneys who are selected based upon their experi- 
ence in the subject matter, as well as their familiarity with the role of paralegals as part of the legal 
team. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 60 credits 

Average Salary 

$35,000 annually 



124 



Associate of Applied Science 

To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 
This is NOT a recommended sequence. You must talk to your program chair before registering for any of these courses. 



General Education Core 




18 credits 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


HEW 


102 


English Composition II 


3 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Science Elective 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Social Science or Humanities Elective 


3 


Technical Core 






30 credits 


LEG 


101 


Introduction to Paralegal Studies 


3 


LEG 


102 


Legal Research 


3 


LEG 


103 


Civil Procedure 


3 


LEG 


106 


Tort Law 


3 


LEG 


107 


Contracts and Commercial Law 


3 


LEG 


108 


Property Law 


3 


A LEG 


202 


Litigation 


3 


LEG 


203 


Law Office Technology 


3 


LEG 


204 


Legal Writing 


3 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


Elcctives (Choose four, two must be LEG courses) 


12 credits 


LEG 


205 


Business Associations 


3 


LEG 


209 


Family Law 


3 


LEG 


210 


Wills, Trusts and Estates 


3 


LEG 


211 


Criminal Law 


3 


LEG 


212 


Bankruptcy Law 


3 


LEG 


280 


Paralegal Internship 


3 


ACC 


101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


ACC 


105 


Income Tax Accounting 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


OAD 


116 


Business Communications 


3 


OAD 


207 


Integrated Application 


3 


OAD 


218 


Spreadsheets 


3 


OAD 


288 


Word Perfect 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


General education course 


3 


A Capstone Course 







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125 



Practical Nursing 



The licensed practical nurse is an integral part of the health care team. The Practical Nursing program 
is a one-year course of study leading to a Technical Certificate. This accredited program prepares the 
individual to take the state licensure exam to become a licensed practical nurse (LPN). This program 
is designed for students to gain the knowledge and technical skills necessary to appropriately care for 
patients in a variety of health care settings, such as hospitals, convalescent centers, and physicians 
offices. 

♦ The Indianapolis program is accredited by the Indiana State Board of Nursing and the 
National League of Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). 

♦ This program begins in the fall and spring semesters of this 12-month program that requires 
two semesters and a 11 -week summer session. 

♦ The PSB Aptitude Test Practical Nursing is required after Skills Advancement 

courses (reading, writing and math) are completed or almost completed. The fee 
for this test is $20. 

♦ The starting salary is $10 to $25 per hour, which can increase up to 25 percent 
because of shift differentials and fringe benefits. Salaries vary widely due to positions. 

♦ Applicants are advised to apply six to nine months in advance of desired 
admission. 

♦ The Practical Nursing program utilizes many facilities within the community for clinical 
rotations as a component of the Practical Nursing program. 



126 



Technical Certificate 



To receive this certificate, you must earn 52 credits. 

General Education Core 6 credits 

HEW 101 English Composition: Strategies for Inquiry 3 

APS 142 Introduction to Psychology 3 

46 credits 

Anatomy and Physiology I 3 

Anatomy and Physiology II 3 

Nursing Issues and Trends 1 

Introduction to Nursing I 4 

Introduction to Nursing II 6 

Pharmacology 3 

Care of the Adult I 5 

Care of the Adult II 5 

Care of the Adult III 5 

Nursing Care of the Older Adult 5 

Nursing Care of the Child-Bearing Family 6 

Additional courses which will help develop students for program courses: 

ENG 007 Spelling 1 

Introduction to Life Sciences 3 

Computer Literacy 2 

Medical Terminology 3 

Phlebotomy 3 

College and Life Success Skills 3 



Technical Core 




ANP 


101 


ANP 


102 


PNU 


114 


PNU 


121 


PNU 


122 


PNU 


123 


PNU 


127 


PNU 


128 


PNU 


129 


PNU 


130 


PNU 


131 



BIO 


065 


CIS 


074 


HHS 


101 


MEA 


212 


IVY 


070 



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127 



Practical Nursing Program 

The Practical Nursing program admits 80 students in the fall semester and 80 students in the spring semester. 
The program is a combination of lecture, nursing laboratory, and a variety of clinical assignments. It is a 
requirement of Ivy Tech-Central Indiana that ANP 101 be taken and passed before consideration for admission. 
It is recommended that the four total GTS courses be taken and passed before entering the program. These 
courses are HEW 101, APS 142, ANP 101, and ANP 102. The PSB must be taken and passed with a score of 
25 or above in all areas to be considered for admission. If the student has a GPA, it must be above a 2.00. The 
total net scores of the PSB testing are compiled to rank order the students. The students with the highest net 
scores are accepted first. 

Semester 1 (16 Weeks) 

1 3 Credits of PNU courses 

3 Credits of ANP 1 02 (if not taken already) 

3 Credits of HEW 101 and/or APS 142 (if not already taken) 
19 Credits 

There is one clinical day per week. Clinic hours are usually 6:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Lecture and lab 
courses occur during the other four weekdays. Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Semester 2 (16 Weeks) 

15 Credits of PNU courses 

3 Credits of HEW 101 or APS 142 (if not already taken) 
18 Credits 

There are two and half clinical days per week (20 hours) and lectures on the other three weekdays. 

Semester 3 (11 Weeks) (Summer) 

1 2 Credits of PNU courses 
12-15 There are three clinical days per week throughout the entire session. Lecture on other two week days. 
51-52 Total credits 

There are breaks between semesters. 

Nature of Work 

Licensed practical nurses work under the direction of physicians and registered nurses. In hospitals, licensed 
practical nurses provide much of the bedside care. They provide nursing care under the direction of the nurse 
and/or physician. Licensed practical nurses can work in private homes providing day-to-day care. In addition 
to providing nursing care, they may prepare meals and see that patients are comfortable. Such nurses work for 
an agency. 

In doctors offices and in clinics, licensed practical nurses prepare patients for examination and treatment, 
administer medications, apply dressings, and teach patients prescribed health care regimens, make appointments 
and record information about patients. 

Working Conditions 

Licensed practical nurses work any shift with wide variations in schedules. 

Employment 

Opportunities include hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation centers, psychiatric hospitals, and other long-term 
care facilities as well as clinics or doctors offices. 

128 



' 



Pay Ranges 

$10.00-525.00 per hour (average). Additional differential compensation may be earned depending upon other 
skills or shift hours. 

Length of Program 

Three semesters (Some courses may be taken prior to admission into the program.) 

Cost of Program 

Approximately $5,500 

Accredited by: 

The Indiana State Board of Nurses Registration and Nursing Education and the National League for Nursing 
Accrediting Commission. Graduates are eligible to take the examination (NCLEX) to become a licensed prac- 
tical nurse in Indiana after successful completion of the program. 

To be eligible for admission into the Practical Nursing Program 

1. ANP 101 must be completed prior to admission and ANP 102 also may be taken before entering the 
Practical Nursing Program. These courses are either co-requisites or prerequisites to all practical nursing 
courses. ANP 101 must be completed before entering the program. ANP 102 can be taken in the first 
semester with PN courses. It is strongly recommended that ANP 102 be completed before admission to 
the program. 

2. A. Complete an application form to Ivy Tech. 

B. Submit an official copy of high school transcript or GED. 

C. Submit an official copy of transcript from previous colleges if student wishes to transfer credits. 

3. Take the Ivy Tech State College ASSET Test to evaluate entry skills in reading, writing, basic math and 
English. This test may be waived if appropriate courses from another college are evaluated. The tran- 
script must be officially evaluated before waiver can be granted. 

4. If the ASSET test determines that the applicant does not meet the entry levels established for the PNU 
program, the applicant must enroll in and successfully completely the required basic skills courses which 
include: 

ENG 031 and/or ENG 032 Reading Skills 

ENG 024 and/or ENG 025 Writing Skills C8 

MAT 044 Basic Math 

ENG 024 and/or ENG 025 Writing Skills -S 

MAT 044 Basic Math 
The College may require the applicant to enroll in a college orientation course based upon reading and writing 
levels. This course helps the applicant succeed in college-level courses by acquiring organizational time 
management and study skills before proceeding to General Education and program level courses. 

5. Once the applicant has achieved successful grades in the required Foundation Course, he/she may take 
the PSB Aptitude Test for Practical Nursing. This is a three-hour nationally standardized test to meas- 
ure the applicant's abilities to be successful in a nursing career. The test includes basic math problems, 
spelling, sciences, and nursing judgement categories. There is a $20.00 fee for this test. 

The program requires a minimum score of the 25th percentile in each of the seven test categories of the PSB. 
If the applicant achieves the mandated scores on the first PSB, his/her application will be forwarded to the 
Admissions Committee for consideration when the next class is being selected. 



129 



The college may require the applicant to enroll in a college orientation course based upon reading and 
writing levels. This course helps the applicant succeed in college-level courses by acquiring organization- 
al, time management, and study skills before proceeding to General Education and program level courses. 

5. Once the applicant has achieved successful grades in the required Foundation Course, he/she may take the 
PSB Aptitude Test for Practical Nursing. This is a three-hour nationally standardized test to measure 
the applicant's abilities to be successful in a nursing career. The test includes basic math problems, 
spelling, sciences, and nursing judgement categories. There is a $20.00 fee for this test. 

The program requires a minimum score of the 25th percentile in each of the seven test categories of the PSB. If 
the applicant achieves the mandated scores on the first PSB, his/her application will be forwarded to the 
Admissions Committee for consideration when the next class is being selected. 

Applicants may take the PSB two times, 30 days apart, within a one-year time period. Scores are valid for one 
year. 

Deadlines for PSB and Applications: 
Applicant must have: 

1 . Passing grade of "S" for reading, "C" or better for ENG 024, ENG 025, MAT 044. 

2. PSB Test with 25th percentile score in each of 7 categories. 

3. 2.0 GPA or higher in courses taken at Ivy Tech. 

4. Call 92 1 -4450 for a PSB packet. 

Applicants will be notified by mail as to their acceptance into the program. Not all applicants will be accepted. 

Applicants will be rank ordered according to the sum of the PSB raw scores or percentile scores and offered 
admission to the program according to the number of clinical spots available. 

BEFORE YOU MAKE YOUR DECISION TO APPLY FOR ADMISSION, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER THE 
FOLLOWING: 

1. Can you achieve the 25th percentile level in each of the seven categories of the PSB test? Many appli- 
cants have difficulty with the science section. We strongly recommend that you take BIO 065 Life 
Science and CHM 061 Chemistry and ANP 101. Taking ANP 102 is recommended. Science is not the 
only category in which applicants do not achieve the 25th percentile level. 

2. If you are accepted into the program can you maintain a "C" average in each of the courses? Can you 
carry a load of 19 to 22 credits in some semesters? 

According to the rules and regulations of the Indiana State Board of Nursing, a student must pass each 
course with a grade of "C" or better to graduate and to be eligible for licensure in Indiana. The pro- 
gram must be completed within two years of admission to the program. 

The failure of two program course(s) will deny the student the right to continue in the program, and the 
student will be withdrawn. A student may repeat a failed program course one time. A failure of a sec- 
ond program course will result in withdrawal from the program. 

An exception to the above paragraph: PNU 121 Introduction to Nursing I; PNU 122 Introduction to 
Nursing n. A student must make a "C" or better in each of the above courses and/or PNU 123 
Pharmacology before progressing to the next semester. 

130 



PNU 121 Introduction to Nursing I must be passed with a "C" or better to progress to PNU 122 
Introduction to Nursing II. A student must make a "C" or better in each of the above courses and/or 
PNU 123 Pharmacology before progressing to the next semester. 

Note: If one "Care of the Adult" course is failed, a student cannot progress to the next "Care of the 
Adult" course within that semester. 

All Ivy Tech State College policies concerning incomplete grades and academic probation will be fol- 
lowed. A 2.0 GPA in regular program courses must be maintained in order to progress each semester. 

What are your work requirements and family commitments? The program typically requires your atten- 
dance between 30-40 hours per week. You must allow for study time to prepare for all courses in order 
to maintain your academic average to remain in the program. 



Do you have adequate transportation to get to the clinical assignments as well as to the college for your 
courses? 

Do you have adequate child care? 

These are specific attendance requirements for the program. There are stringent rules of allowable 
absences. Attendance problems can lead to dismissal from the program during any semester. 

4. Physical Criteria - Compliance with the American Disabilities Act. 

A. Vision: Correct to 20/20 

B. Hearing: Correct to normal with amplification for listening sounds: B/P; Breath; Abdominal 

C. Haptic: Related to sense of touch; within normal limits 

D. Manual Dexterity: Able to perform manipulative skills with speed, dexterity and agility 

E. Physical Strength: Able to lift with no restrictions 

F. Physical Mobility: Able to climb stairs, bend and stretch 

5. You can decrease some of your course load in the first two semesters by completing any or all of the fol- 
lowing courses before you are accepted into the program: ANP 101, ANP 102, APS 142 and HEW 101. 

Special note: For some health programs, if you have been convicted of a crime you may not be eligible to be 
licensed/certified as a health practitioner. 






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ce 

3 



131 



Public Safety Technology 



Specialties: 

Environmental Management 

Fire Science 

Hazardous Materials 

Public Administration Specialties 

The Public Safety Technology Program is designed to meet the ongoing needs of municipalities, stu- 
dents, businesses, and industries. The program develops technical skills, general knowledge, critical 
thinking, and problem-solving abilities. Broad-based technical skills and critical thinking processes 
assist students in adapting to changes in the work environment and promoting successful advancement 
on the job. Additionally, the program prepares graduates to transfer to baccalaureate degree-granting 
instimtions if they wish to continue their education. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 60-63 credits 

Average Salary 

$31,449 annually 



132 



Associate of Applied Science 



Environmental Management 

To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 

SIC 101 

HSS 143 

HEW 101 

MAT 111 

APO 111 

SPS 101 

SIL 101 



Chemistry I 

Speech 

English Composition I 

Intermediate Algebra 

American National Government 

Physical Science OR 

Introductory Biology 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 






Technical Core 




PST 


120 


PST 


121 


PST 


220 


PST 


221 


TEC 


104 


TEC 


106 


Specialty Core 




ENV 


101 


ENV 


102 


ENV 


103 


ENV 


110 


HMT 


200 



First Responder 

Risk Management 

Incident Management System 

Computer Design and Planning 

Computer Fundamentals for Technology 

Hazardous Materials and Control 



Intro to Environmental Technology 
Environmental Management 
Environmental Chemistry 
Environmental Toxicology 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
Regulations 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



mmat 

" 



Regionally Determined Core (choose four) 

ENV 104 Plant Operations-Sanitary 

ENV 105 Air Management 

ENV 106 Water Management 

ENV 203 Environmental Microbiology 

ENV 208 Plant Operations-Industrial 

HMT 203 Sampling Procedures 



12 credits 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



tsx 






133 



Associate of Applied Science 



Fire Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 63-64 credits. 



General Education Core 

SIC 101 

HSS 143 

HEW 101 

MAT 111 

APO 111 

SPS 101 

SIL 101 



Chemistry I 

Speech 

English Composition I 

Intermediate Algebra 

American National Government 

Physical Science OR 

Introductory Biology 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Technical Core 

PST 120 

PST 121 

PST 220 

PST 221 

TEC 104 

TEC 106 



First Responder 

Risk Management 

Incident Management System 

Computer Design and Planning 

Computer Fundamentals for Technology 

Hazardous Materials and Control 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Specialty Core 

AFS 102 

AFS 103 

AFS 201 

AFS 202 

AFS 204 



Fire Apparatus and Equipment 
Strategy and Tactics 
Fire Protection Systems 
Fire Service Management 
Fire Service Hydraulics 



Regionally Determined Core (choose four) 

AFS 100 Fire Suppression 

AFS 101 Fire Technology 

AFS 104 Building Construction Fire Service 

AFS 105 Fire and Arson Investigation 

AFS 108 Fire Prevention/Inspection 

AFS 109 Fire Department Specifications 



15 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12-13 credits 

3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 



134 



Associate of Applied Science 



Hazardous Materials 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 




18 credits 


SIC 


101 


Chemistry I 


3 


HSS 


143 


Speech 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


APO 


111 


American National Government 


3 


SPS 


101 


Physical Science OR 




SIL 


101 


Introductory Biology 


3 


Technical Core 






18 credits 


PST 


120 


First Responder 


3 


PST 


121 


Risk Management 


3 


PST 


220 


Incident Management System 


3 


PST 


221 


Computer Design and Planning 


3 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 


106 


Hazardous Materials and Control 


3 


Specialty Core 






12 credits 


HMT 


100 


OSHA Regulations 


3 


HMT 


104 


Haz-Mat Health Effect 


3 



HMT 



220 



Regionally Determined Core 

ENV 104 

HMT 201 

HMT 203 

HMT 205 



Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 

Regulations 

Hazardous Materials Recovery, 

Incineration and Disposal 



Plant Operator (Waste Water) 
Contingency Planning 
Sampling Procedures 
DOT Regulations 



pimp 

■» 

i 



12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



e 

€8 



SI 

3 



135 



Associate of Applied Science 



Public Administration 



To receive this degree, you must earn 60 credits. 



General Education Core 




18 credits 


SIC 101 


Chemistry I 


3 


HSS 143 


Speech 


3 


HEW 101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


APO 111 


American National Government 


3 


SPS 101 


Physical Science OR 




SIL 101 


Introductory Biology 


3 


Technical Core 




18 credits 


PST 120 


First Responder 


3 


PST 121 


Risk Management 


3 


PST 220 


Incident Management System 


3 


PST 221 


Computer Design and Planning 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 106 


Hazardous Materials and Control 


3 


Specialty Core 




12 credits 


BUS 105 


Principles of Management 


3 


BUS 208 


Organizational Behavior 


3 


OPM 224 


Operations Management 


3 


APO 112 


State-Local Government 


3 


Regionally Determined Core 




12 credits 


ACC 101 


Accounting Principles 


3 


PST 288 


Public Administration 


3 


PST 288 


Internship 


3 


APO 201 


Intro to Political Science 


3 



136 



Radiologic Technology 



The Radiologic Technologist is someone who specializes in using x-rays to create images of 
the body. The radiographs that are produced by the radiographer enable the doctor to diagnose 
the patient for disease, fractures, or any irregularities. Therefore, a radiographer must be a 
professional who is skilled in the art and science of radiography and is able to apply scientific 
knowledge, problem-solving techniques, and use of high tech equipment, while providing 
quality patient care. Technologists are in demand in hospitals, clinics, physicians and dentists' 
offices, federal and state agencies, industry, and certain education institutions. 



This program includes courses such as patient care, radiographic technique, positioning, 
radiation exposure, radiation protection, physics, pathology and ethics, (complete list in this 
section) Clinical practice and supplemental instruction are provided in accredited sites. Upon 
completion of this program, graduates are eligible to take the American Registry Examination 
given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. 

The Radiologic Technology Program is a full-time program. Once accepted students will 
rotate to the clinical sites and have didactic instruction at Ivy Tech State College. 

For some health programs, you may not be eligible to be licensed or certified if you have been 
convicted of a felony. 

Average Salary 

In central Indiana $25,000 to $39,000 per year depending on years of experience and 
specialty. 

Program Goals 

The program goals of the Ivy Tech State College Radiologic Technology Program are to: 

1 . Educate students to perform radiology exams using the ALARA principle. 

2. Provide educational experiences with various procedures adapted for age-specific patients. 

3. Prepare students to be eligible to write the National Registry of Radiologic Technologist 
exam. 

4. Examine student competency level to ensure improvement as program progresses. 

5. Promote professionalism and continuing education throughout the program. 



S 

o 



m 



m 



137 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 85 credits. 



General Education Core 

ANP 101 

ANP 102 

TEC 113 

HSS 143 

HEW 101 

MAT 111 

APS 142 

ASO 151 



Anatomy and Physiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 
Basic Electricity 
Speech 

English Composition I 
Intermediate Algebra 
General Psychology OR 
Principles of Sociology 



21 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Technical Core 






9 credits 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


HHS 


101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


HHS 


105 


Medical Law and Ethics 


3 


Specialty Core 






55 credits 


RAD 


111 


Orientation and Patient Care 


3 


RAD 


112 


Image Production and Evaluation I 


3 


RAD 


113 


Radiographic Positioning I & Lab 


3 


RAD 


114 


Clinical Education I 


4 


RAD 


115 


Radiographic Positioning II & Lab 


3 


RAD 


116 


Clinical Education II 


4 


RAD 


117 


Physics & Equipment Operation 


3 


RAD 


201 


Radiographic Positioning m & Lab 


2 


RAD 


202 


Clinical Education HI 


4 


RAD 


203 


Clinical Education TV 


4 


RAD 


204 


Clinical Education V 


4 


RAD 


205 


Radiographic Pathology 


2 


RAD 


206 


Radiobiology 


3 


RAD 


209 


Radiographic Positioning IV 


3 


RAD 


218 


Imaging Production & Evaluation II 


2 


RAD 


220 


Advanced Procedures and Special Modalities 


2 


RAD 


288 


Radiographic Pharmacology 


3 


RAD 


299 


General Exam Review 


3 



All courses will be reviewed for GPA by the admissions committee before consideration for interview. 



138 



Application and Interview Information 

If you are planning to apply to the Radiologic Technology Program, please read this information care- 
fully 

The Radiologic Technology Program has a limited enrollment based on clinical site availability. Only 
12 to 16 students are accepted into the program each year. Application and/or completion of prerequi- 
site courses does not guarantee admission into the program. 

Students must have everything completed and submitted by March 1 preceding the fall semester 
for which they wish to be considered for admission. 

General College Admission Procedures 

In effect for all students applying for programs starting after January 1, 2001. 



m 



§n 



1. Fill out an application obtained from the admissions office - (317) 921-4800. 

2. Submit an official high school transcript or GED and previous college transcript to 
the registrar's office. Make sure that the transcripts are mailed by your previous 
school to the registrar at Ivy Tech State College. 

3. Complete the ASSET Test for radiologic technology. If indicated, complete with a 
"C" or higher any foundation courses before taking program-level courses. 

4. Complete all prerequisite courses or be in the process of completing them during 
semester of application with a GPA of 2.5 or higher to be considered for admission. 

5. Two hospital radiology department visits for four hours to shadow a technologist are 
required. These visits must be scheduled through the program. Call (317) 921-4414. 

6. Write and submit to the program chair a 500- to 700-word report based on your hospital 
visits and why the Radiologic Technology field is good for you. 

7. Student must be 1 8 before starting the clinical portion of the program. 

8. Any accepted student must also meet requirements by the state licensing agency. 
The student will be notified of these upon acceptance to the program. 

9. Acceptance into the program will be conditional until a completed physical form 
has been returned to the program. Students will be given more information upon 
acceptance into the program. 

Students meeting all of the requirements by the end of the spring semester will be invited to an inter- 
view with the Radiologic Technology Program admissions committee. Interviews will be at the end of Mk 
March or beginning of April. 

Prior to completion of general education courses, you will register with the academic advising office 
or the health counselor in the Health Sciences division office. After completion of prerequisite general 
and technical core courses, you will need to contact the Radiologic Technology program chair in order 
to register for classes. 

Registration with someone else could delay admission to the program. 



139 



Below is a suggested sequence for taking prerequisite courses. 

Semester 1 

HHS 101 Medical Terminology 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 

Semester 2 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity or a Science course approved by the department 

Semester 3 

ANP 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 

Courses below may be out of sequence: 

APS 142 General Psychology 

ASO 151 Principles of Sociology 

HEW 101 English Composition I 

HSS 102 Medical Law and Ethics 

HSS 143 Speech 

The information in this document is intended for informational purposes only. This material in no way 
comprises a contractual agreement and is subject to change without notice at any time. 

Special note 

For some health programs, if you have been convicted of a crime you may not be eligible to be 
licensed or certified as a health practitioner. We recommend that you check with the program advisor 
for your areas of interest. Their phone numbers are listed in the handbook. 

Visiting a Radiology Department 

Scheduled visits should be through the program office (317) 921-4438. After completing your visits, 
write a 500- to 700- word paper addressing your impressions of the visits and why you think this is a 
good field for you to go into. The visits should take place during the fall or spring semester prior to 
interviewing. If you are interviewing a second time, clinical visits must be repeated. The clinical 
instructor at the sites must fill out the hospital verification forms and they will return them to the pro- 
gram director. 

Student visits will be scheduled at two of the following sites: 

• Bloomington Hospital • St. Vincent's Hospital 

Bloomington, IN Indianapolis, IN 

Contact: Sherri Edie, BS, R.T. (R)) Contact: David Sidor, B.S. RT. (R) 

812-353-9356 or 812-353-5636 317-338-2868 



• Johnson Memorial • Westview Hospital 
Franklin, IN Indianapolis, IN 
Contact: Kellie Cranfill, BS, RT (R) Contact: Sherry Cialdella 
317-736-3474 317-920-7554 

• Winona Memorial Hospital 
Indianapolis, IN 

Contact: Haya Bannourah, AAS, RT (R) 
317-927-2331 

Please be on time for your site visit and dress appropriately for your clinic visits. Should you have any 
further questions you may contact Ann Sisel at 921-4438. 

140 



Hospital Visitation Verification Form 



Student 



Visitation Site 
Visitation Date 

Arrival Time — 



iJEP 



Departure Time 



Visitation Coordinator 

Signature 

Date 



Please leave this form with the clinical instructor at the site you visited. 



as 



141 



Hospital Visitation Verification Form 



Student 



Visitation Site 
Visitation Date 



Arrival Time 



Departure Time 



Visitation Coordinator 

Signature 

Date 



Please leave this form with the clinical instructor at the site you visited. 



142 



Notice of Intent 

This is a notice of intent for the following student to enter the Radiologic Technology 
Program. This notice should be on file in the program office no later than March 1 of the 
year in which the student wishes to be admitted to the program. 

Name 

Address 



City, ST Zip 
Home phone 



Work phone 

Student ID number 

I wish to be considered for admission into the (year) class for Radiologic 

Technology. 

Student signature 

Date 



CD 



143 



Admission Process 

Students who wish to apply to the Radiologic Technology program starting in the 
fall session must have on file in the radiology technology program office all of the following informa- 
tion on or before March 1. 

1 . Notice of intent sent to program director 

2. Ivy Tech application 

3. High school transcript 

4. Transcripts from all previous colleges and universities 

5. Admission test scores (ASSET test score) 

6. Documentation of hospital visitations. 

7. A 500- to 700-word paper on hospital visitation and why Radiologic Technology is a good field for 
you. 

8. Show or complete current enrollment in all prerequisite classes. 

9. Two letters of recommendation. 



Selection Process 

Only those applicants with complete files will be offered an interview with the admissions committee. 
The personal interview is a privilege offered to the applicant by the committee. Not all applicants will 
be interviewed. 

Students are admitted into the Radiologic Technology program based upon the 
following criteria: 

• College GPA 

• Personal interview 

• 500- to 700- word paper 

• Hospital visitations 

• Letters of recommendation 

Questions about the admission process should be addressed to the program chair. 



144 



Admission Checklist 

1 . Submit application to the admissions office. 



Submit official high school transcript to the 
registrar's office. 



Submit any previous college transcripts to 
the registrar's office. 

Complete the skills assessment test 
(ASSET) for Radiologic Technology. 

Complete all general education courses as 
determined by the skills assessment test. 

Submit General Technical Studies Change 
of Program form. 



To be considered for an interview with the program 
committee, you must: 



Complete all prerequisite courses with a 
GPAof2.5 or higher. 

Submit a notice of intent to the Radiologic 
Technology program office. 

Visit two assigned radiology 
departments at program 
clinical sites and submit to the program 
office a 500- to 700-word paper of what was 
observed and why Radiologic Technology is 
a good field for you to enter. 

Send 2 letters of recommendation to pro- 
gram chair. 



10. 



At time of application to college 
At time of application to college 

At time of application to college 

Upon admission to college 

Upon admission to college 



Upon acceptance into Radiologic Technology 
program 



While enrolled in General Technical Studies 



Prior to March 1 of the year you are 
applying to begin the program 

Fall or spring semester before applying to pro- 
gram 



Must be turned in to the program chair by 
March 1 



5> 

o 



V'. 






fSBf 

s 

V) 



145 



Respiratory Care 



A respiratory care practitioner is an allied health professional who works under the direction of physi- 
cians in the diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, education and care of patients with cardiopulmonary dis- 
eases or abnormalities. 

A graduate of the Associate of Applied Science program will be eligible to sit for the Entry Level and 
Advanced Practitioner exams given by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). Successful 
exam candidates will be awarded the Registered Respiratory Therapist credential. The program's pass 
rate for the national exam exceeds national averages. 

The two-year Associate of Applied Science degree requires 79 credits for completion. 

The Associate Degree program is offered on both a full-time and part-time track. Both tracks require 
set courses each semester for the duration of the program. Students are accepted into either the full- 
time program or the part-time program. The full-time program is four semesters in length (18 credits 
per semester) and starts in the spring semester of each year. The part-time program is six semesters in 
length (9-12 credits per semester) and starts in the fall semester each year. Students may start their 
general education courses any semester. Students should contact the program chairperson for specific 
curriculum and admission information. 

Degree Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 79 credits 

Average Salary 

$36,000 annually as reported by graduate respondents 



146 



Associate of Applied Science - Full-Time 



To receive this degree, you must earn 79 credits. 



Prerequisites 




ANP 


101 


SIL 


211 


SIC 


101 


HEW 


101 


MAT 


111 


APS 


142 


Semester 1 (spring) 


ANP 


102 


RES 


121 


RES 


122 


RES 


123 


RES 


124 



Semester 2 (summer) 

RES 125 

RES 126 

RES 127 

RES 223 

Semester 3 (fall) 

RES 128 

RES 221 

RES 222 



Anatomy & Physiology I 

Microbiology for Health Professionals I 

Chemistry I 

English Composition I 

Intermediate Algebra 

General Psychology 



Anatomy & Physiology II 
Introduction to Respiratory Care 
Therapeutic Modalities 
Cardiopulmonary Physiology 
Clinical I 



Critical Care I 
Clinical Medicine I 
Clinical II 
Pharmacology 



Clinical EI 

Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 
Critical Care n 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 credits 

3 
6 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

15 credits 

9 

3 
3 






Semester 4 (spring) 

RES 227 

RES 226 

RES 224 

RES 229 

HEW 108 



Clinical IV 
Continuing Care 
Clinical Medicine II 
Emergency Management 
Technical Writing 



*HSS 143 or HSS 148 may substitute for HEW 108 



16 credits 

6 

2 
3 
2 
3 



o 



m 



147 



Letter of Intent - Full-Time Program 

Iw Tech State College 
RESPIRATORY THERAPY PROGRAM 

Letter of Intent - Full-Time Program 

I have completed or will have completed all of my prerequisite courses by January 

of , therefore it is my intent to apply for entrance into the full-time class at Ivy 

(year) 
Tech State College Respiratory Therapy Program. I realize that classes start in January of 

the year . 



Thank you, 



Street Address 



City, State & Zip Code 



Phone Number 



E-mail address 



Social Security Number 



Signature Date 



Printed 



148 



Associate of Applied Science - Part-time 



To receive this degree, you must earn 79 credits. 



Prerequisites 

ANP 101 
SIL 211 
SIC 101 
HEW 101 
MAT 111 
APS 142 


Anatomy & Physiology I 

Microbiology for Health Professionals I 

Chemistry I 

English Composition I 

Intermediate Algebra 

General Psychology 


18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Semester 1 (fall) 
RES 121 
RES 123 
RES 124 


Introduction to Respiratory Care 
Cardiopulmonary Physiology 
Clinical I 


12 credits 

6 

3 
3 


Semester 2 (spring) 

RES 122 
RES 126 

XXX XXX 
XXX XXX 


Therapeutic Modalities 
Clinical Medicine I 
General Education requirement 
General Education requirement 


9-12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 


Semester 3 (summer) 

RES 125 
RES 127 
RES 223 


Critical Care I 
Clinical II 
Pharmacology 


9 credits 

3 
3 
3 


Semester 4 (fall) 

RES 128 
RES 222 


Clinical m 
Critical Care II 


12 credits 

9 

3 


Semester 5 (spring) 

RES 227 
RES 226 
RES 224 
RES 229 


Clinical IV 
Continuing Care 
Clinical Medicine II 
Emergency Management 


13 credits 

6 

2 
3 
2 


Semester 6 (summer) 

RES 221 

XXX XXX 


Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 
General Education requirement 


4-6 credits 

3 
3 






o 

18 

m 



149 



Letter of Intent - Part-Time Program 

Iw Tech State College 
RESPIRATORY THERAPY PROGRAM 

Letter of Intent - Part-Time Program 

I have completed or will have completed all of my prerequisite courses by January 

of , therefore it is my intent to apply for entrance into the part-time class at Ivy 

(year) 
Tech State College Respiratory Therapy Program. I realize that classes start in January of 

the year . 



Thank you, 



Printed 



Street Address 



City, State & Zip Code 



Phone Number 



E-mail address 



Social Security Number 



Signature Date 



150 



Tips for Successful Completion of Prerequisites: 

1 . Do not take Chemistry before Algebra. 

2. In order to be ready for Chemistry, the student should achieve a "C" or better in 
Algebra. 

3. Psychology and English can be taken together. 

4. Any general education course is ok with one science course. 

5. It is an acceptable work load to take Anatomy/Physiology with 1 other science course, 
but not in the summer unless you are an exceptional student and are not working. 

6. Do not take Anatomy/Physiology, Microbiology and Chemistry together unless you are 
a full time student, not working and live at home. 

7. Any science course is hard during the summer unless it is 1 course only. N » 

8. It is better to take Anatomy/Physiology 2 and Technical Writing or its equivalent before 
entering the program. 

9. To transfer a course the student must have a "C" or better unless it was part of another 
degree. 

10. For every hour that the student is in class, 3 hours outside of class should be spent 
studying for that class. 

1 1 . Other courses that can be helpful: 

- HHS 101 Medical Terminology 

- MEA 205 Electrocardiograms (3) 

- MEA 212 Phlebotomy (3) 

- HHS 105 Medical Law and Ethics (3) 

- MEA 102 First Aid and CPR (2) 

- CSI 174 Computer Literacy (2) 

- HLS 101 Spanish I (4) 

- HLS 103 Spanish H (4) 



When you have 3 or less prerequisites left, make an appointment with the Respiratory Therapy 
Program Chair at (317) 921-4410 or with the Director of Clinical Education at (317) 921-4696 
for further assistance. 



m 

3 
m 



151 



Iw Tech State College 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY PROGRAM 

One West 26th Street 
Indianapolis, IN 46206 

Program Chair: Marcus Stowe MS, RRT (3 1 7) 92 1 -44 1 0, 

E-mail: mstowe@ivytech.edu 
Director of Clinical Education: Jennifer Reece RN, RRT (3 1 7) 92 1 -4696, 

E-mail: jreece@ivytech.edu 

Check list for Respiratory Therapy Program: 

1 . Completed prerequisites 

OR lack only one(l) prerequisite course 

2. Sent your Letter of Intent to Program Chair by March 1 for the 

part-time program and August 1 for the full-time program 

3. Had your official transcripts from previous colleges and universities 

sent to the program chair by March 1 for the part-time program and 

August 1 for the full-time program 

(hand delivered transcripts will not be accepted) 

4. Had five letters of recommendation sent to the Program Chair by March 1 

for the part-time program and August 1 for the Full-time program. Each 

recommendation must be signed or it will not be valid 

(hand delivered letter of recommendations will not be accepted) 

5. Attended an orientation session with the Program Chair and/or 

Director of Clinical Education. You may find out when these sessions 
are by calling (317) 921-4800 

6. Put together your professional portfolio for the interview 

Should contain the minimum of the following 

- your personal statement (500 word essay) 

- two (2) hospital visitation forms 

- previous employer evaluations 

- any pertinent/appropriate certificates 

- SEE THE PORTFOLIO INFORMATION SHEET 
INCLUDED THIS SECTION 

7. Signed up for the interview once you receive a letter with the dates and times 



152 



Personal Portfolio 

Your personal portfolio is a representation of yourself and your achievements as well as your weak- 
nesses. It should address how you are working on your weakness and what you have learned about 
yourself. 
The portfolio should contain the following: 

• Personal statement for what your future career and personal goals are, what 
becoming a Respiratory Care Practitioner will do for you, why should you be 
allowed into this program. This should be a 500-word typed essay. 

• Documentation of 2 hospital visits (forms provided) O 

• Any certificates from other health care programs or courses 

• Any appropriate previous employer evaluations 

• Any other documentation that you feel will represent yourself well 

a. 

You must have your official transcripts and 5 letters of recommendation sent to the program chair. 
These items will not be accepted if hand delivered. The letter of intent, which is provided, the tran- 
scripts and the 5 letters of recommendation must be turned in by April 1 for the part-time program and 
September 1 for the full-time program in order to be considered a viable applicant. 

You may choose to use the following resources for developing your personal portfolio or you may 
choose your own format. 

.,» 
Websites: Professional Portfolio Guide 
Portfolio Library 

The portfolio should be brought with you to the interview in a binder. Remember, this is a profession- 
al representation of yourself. It will be reviewed for the following criteria and each category could 
receive 20 points each for a total of 100: 

Completeness: all of the above items must be present 

Creativity © 

Professional presentation 

Grammar and punctuation 

Ability to follow directions 



31 

mmm 

m 



153 



The following hospitals have an affiliation agreement with Ivy Tech State College. The prospective stu- 
dent can contact the individuals below to set a date and time for a hospital visitation. 



1 . Ball Memorial 

2. Bloomington Hospital 

3. Columbus 

4. Hendricks 

5. Johnson Memorial 

6. Kindred on 10th Street 

7. Kindred in Greenwood 

8. Major Hospital 

9. Methodist 

10. Midtown 

1 1 . Putnam County 

12. Riley 

13. Riverview 

14. St. Francis 

15. St. Vincent 

16. Select at Methodist 

17. Select at St. Francis 

18. Union in Terre Haute 

19. University Hospital 

20. VA 

21. Westview 

22. Winona 

23. Wishard 

24. Witham Memorial 



Kathy Stephens 

Ted Jackson 

Jane McLeod 

Bob Weaver 

Brenda Wilkerson 

Marsha Brown 

Michael Morris 

Don Barton 

Pat Doyle 

Sue Bauers 

Sandy Park-Teelon 

Collen Finley 

Nancy Collett 

Dan Wilson 
Barbara Riordan 

Scott Dybedock 
Ellen Mallory 
Romin McCallister 
Chuck Christoph 
Jewel Hicks 
Mike Weingartner 
Rick Lush 
Maria Oparah 
Linda Smith 



(765) 741-1085 

(812) 353-9595 

(812)376-5312 

(317) 745-3486 

(317)736-3261 

(317) 636-4400 ext. 4011 

(317) 888-8155 

(317)421-5681 

(317)929-6174 

(317)924-1325 

1-800-394-9338 ext. 2652 

(317) 274-1002 

(317) 776-7906 

(317) 783-8645 

(317)338-1269 

(317)931-5212 

(317)782-6546 

(812) 238-4919 

(317)274-1674 

(317) 554-0000 ext. 2923 

(317)921-7155 

(317)927-2443 

(317)630-6135 

(765) 482-8695 



154 



Ivy Tech State College 
Hospital Visitation Verification Form 
RESPIRATORY CARE PROGRAM 

The perspective student should spend a minimum of 3 - 4 hours at the hospital during each visit. The 
therapist should attempt to expose the prospective student to as many different types of patients, hos- 
pital personnel and areas as possible. 

Student Name 

Visitation Site Visitation Date 

Arrival Time Arrival Time 



Co 

Therapist's Signature 

jmSI 

Based on your visit and discussions with the respiratory therapists and other staff, answer the ques- 
tions below: 

1. What did you learn from your visit to the hospital? 

- 

2. Did you see anything that makes you think this field is not for you? 

3. What part of your visit surprised you the most and why? 



s 



155 



Non-Traditional or Returning Student Application Procedures 

Ivy Tech Technician Graduate 

If you have graduated from an Ivy Tech technician program and are now a CRT, you may apply to 
complete your RRT and/or your Associate of Applied Science degree. All applicants must demon- 
strate current CRT-level knowledge by having passed the CRT exam in the last two years OR must 
retake the current CRT exam. Please read below to see which category applies to you. 

A. Currently a CRT who wishes to become only RRT eligible. 

You must: 

1) Have four years of experience past date of certification. 

2) Have a total of 62 semester hours of classes required by NBRC. These classes 
must be verified by the NBRC* 

3) Complete the classes listed by the NBRC.** 

B. Currently a CRT who wishes to upgrade to RRT/AAS. 

You must: 

1) Complete RRT-level classes/general education classes.** (See attached sheet) OR 

2) Show completion of RRT exam via route requiring 62 semester hours of classes 
and four years post-CRT experience. Successful completion of registry exam will 
count for the registry-level classes. Complete required general education classes. 
This route will require verification from NBRC. 

C. Currently a RRT who graduated from an Ivy Tech technician program and 
wishes to gain an Associate of Applied Science degree. 

You must: 

1) Complete required general education classes. (See attached sheet for classes)* 



Non-Ivy Tech Technician Graduate 

If you are a CRT who has graduated from any CoARC approved program, you may apply to complete 
the registry and/or associate degree program. Please read below to see which category applies to you. 

A. Currently a CRT who wishes to become only registry eligible. 

You must: 

1) Have four years experience past date of certification and demonstrate 62 semester 

hours. The NBRC will tell you what credits you are missing.* These credits may 

be taken at Ivy Tech.** No degree is awarded. 



156 



B. Currently a CRT who wishes to gain an Associate of Applied Science 
degree and become registry eligible. 

You must: 

1) Demonstrate current knowledge by having passed the CRT exam in the last two years 
OR retake current CRT exam. 

2) Apply for admission to Ivy Tech and take ASSET/Success seminar test. 

3) Provide Ivy Tech with a copy of all college transcripts. Applicable classes will be 
transferred. Work experience will be granted for CRT level classes. 

4) Complete class list given to you by program faculty. The list of classes will 
depend on college-level work already completed and results of ASSET test. 

* The NBRC may be contacted at: NBRC Executive Office, 8310 Nieman Road, 

Lenexa, Kansas 66214; (913) 599-4200 
** All applicants to Ivy Tech may be asked to take the ASSET exam at the time of 

admission. Waivers for this exam may be discussed with program chair or testing 

department staff. 



f s 



Additional questions concerning the program should be directed to: Respiratory Care Practitioner 
Program, Ivy Tech State College, P.O. Box 1763, Indianapolis, IN 46206-1763; (317) 921-4410; 
Program Chair Marcus Stowe, MS, RRT; Director of Clinical Education Jennifer Reece RN, RRT; 
Email: mstowe@ivytech.edu. 






03 



157 



Proposed Credit List for California College CRT Graduate 
Respiratory Care Practitioner Program 

Student name 



SS# 



Required General Education Courses 



ANP 


101 


Anatomy & Physiology I 


3 


CRT 


ANP 


102 


Anatomy & Physiology II 


3 


CRT 


SIC 


101 


Chemistry I 


3 




MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




SIL 


211 


Microbiology 


3 




HEW 


101 


English Composition 


3 




APS 


142 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 




HEW 


108 


Technical Writing 


3 




Required 


Technical Courses 








RES 


121 


Introduction to Respiratory Care 


6 


CRT 


RES 


122 


Therapeutic Modalities 


3 


CRT 


RES 


123 


Cardiopulmonary Physiology 


3 




RES 


124 


Clinical Practicum I 


3 


CRT 


RES 


125 


Critical Care I 


3 


CRT 


RES 


126 


Clinical Medicine I 


3 


CRT 


RES 


127 


Clinical Practicum II 


3 


CRT 


RES 


128 


Clinical Practicum III 


9 


CRT 


RES 


221 


Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 


3 




RES 


222 


Critical Care II 


3 




RES 


223 


Pharmacology 


3 


* 


RES 


224 


Clinical Medicine II 


3 




RES 


229 


Emergency Management 


2 


* 


RES 


226 


Continuing Care 


2 


* 


RES 


227 


Clinical Practicum IV 


6 


* 



Total credits for AAS/RRT 

*Advanced placement is possible. List may vary from person to person. 



79 



Date of completion_ 



Program chair signature_ 



158 



Application steps for CRT to RRT/AAS program 

1 . Complete application for admission to college. 

2. Provide copy of all college transcripts, CRT certificate, and state certification. 

3. Take ASSET test for college admission. 

4. Retake CRT exam provided by Ivy Tech to verify current CRT knowledge levels. 
Must pass at national standard. 

5. Meet with program faculty to develop curriculum list. 

Sample curriculum schedule 
Semester 1 (spring) 



RES 123 


Cardiopulmonary Physiology 


3 hrs/wk 


XXX XXX 


General Education Requirement 


3 credits 


Semester 2 (summer) 






RES 223 


Pharmacology 


3 hrs/wk 


RES 229 


Emergency Management 


2 credits 


Semester 3 (fall) 






RES 222 


Critical Care II 


3 hrs/wk 


RES 226 


Clinical Medicine II 


3 hrs/wk 


RES 227 


Clinical Practicum IV 


1-3 credits 


Semester 4 (spring) 






RES 221 


Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 


3 hrs/wk 


RES 226 


Continuing Care 


2 hrs/wk 


RES 227 


Clinical Practicum IV 


1-3 credits 


Semester 5 (summer) 






RES 227 


Clinical Practicum IV 


1-3 credits 


XXX XXX 


General Education Course 


1-3 credits 


Semester 6 (fall) 






XXX XXX 


General Education Course 


3-6 credits 


Semester 7 (spring) 






XXX XXX 


General Education Course 


3-6 credits 






o 



%r : ; i 



*RES 227 must total six credits 



General Education courses taken at time to be decided upon by participants: 



MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


SIC 


101 


Chemistry I 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition 


3 


APS 


142 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


HEW 


108 


Technical Writing 


3 


SIL 


211 


Microbiology 


3 


ANP 


101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


ANP 


102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 



53 



159 



Surgical Technology 



The surgical technologist is a highly-skilled member of the surgical team, qualified by didactic and 
clinical education to provide safe and efficient care to the patient in the operating room. The didactic 
education consists of courses in anatomy and physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, medical law 
and ethics, surgical techniques, and surgical procedures. Closely supervised clinical education is pro- 
vided in local area hospitals. 

The surgical technologist actively participates in surgery by performing scrub and/or circulating duties 
which include: passing instruments and supplies to the surgical team members, preparing and position- 
ing the patient, operating equipment, assisting the anesthesiologist, and keeping accurate records. 
Students are required to complete foundation courses prior to the clinical education. The program is 
two calendar years in length, requiring 67 credits leading to an Associate of Applied Science degree. 

The program is accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education Accreditation with the Joint 
Review Committee on Education for Surgical Technologists. The full-time program begins during the 
fall semester each year and includes the spring semester and an 11 -week summer session. The general 
education courses can be started any semester. Graduates receive an Associate of Applied Science 
degree. Upon completion of the program, students are eligible to take the National Certification Exam 
for Surgical Technologists. 

The following facilities have collaborated with the college as clinical sites for practical work experi- 
ences required in the program: Community East Hospital, St. Vincent's Hospital and Health Care 
Center, Community North, St. Vincent-Carmel, Hancock Memorial Hospital, Indiana Surgery Center 
East - St. Francis Hospital, Westview Hospital, and Wishard Hospital. 

The starting salary is $10.50 to $13 per hour in hospitals and can increase up to 25 
percent due to shift differentials. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 69 credits 

Average Salary 

$23,233 annually 



160 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 69 credits. 



General Education Core 



22 credits 



ANP 


101 


Anatomy & Physiology I 


3 


ANP 


102 


Anatomy & Physiology II 


3 


SIL 


211 


General Microbiology 


4 


HSS 


143 


Introduction to Public Speaking OR 




HSS 


148 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


HEW 


101 


English Composition I 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


APS 


142 


General Psychology OR 




ASO 


151 


Principles of Sociology 


3 


Technical Core 






47 credits 


SUR 


111 


Fundamentals of Surgical Technology 


4 


SUR 


112 


Application of Surgical Fundamentals 


2 


SUR 


113 


Surgical Procedures I 


3 


SUR 


114 


Clinical Application I 


3 


SUR 


211 


Surgical Procedures II 


6 


SUR 


212 


Clinical Application II 


9 


SUR 


213 


Surgical Procedures in 


3 


SUR 


214 


Clinical Application EI 


8 


HHS 


101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


HHS 


105 


Medical Law/Ethics 


3 


SUR 


288 


Pharmacology 


3 



Suggested courses that help develop students for required courses. These courses 
are not required, and they do not count toward the program. 

ENG 007 Spelling 1 

BIO 065 Basic Life Sciences 3 

PHL 071 Critical Thinking 3 

CIS 074 Computer Literacy 2 

IVY 070 College and Life Success Skills 3 



3B* 
o 

CD 

mmtrn 

o 



21 

3 
w 



161 



Associate of Applied Science - Admission Requirements 

A Certified Surgical Technologist (CST) is a member of the surgical team of surgeons, anesthesiolo- 
gists and certified registered nurse anesthetists, registered nurses, and other surgical personnel in 
delivering patient care and assuming appropriate responsibilities before, during, and after surgery. 

A surgical technologist acts as the sterile person or "scrub," who handles sterile instruments, supplies, 
equipment, medications, solutions, and many other sterile devices necessary during surgical proce- 
dure. The surgical technologist may also act as the unsterile person or "circulator," who obtains addi- 
tional instruments and supplies while the operation is in progress. 

Graduates of accredited programs are eligible to take a national certification exam. Satisfactory per- 
formance on the exam allows the surgical technologist to earn professional credentials and certifica- 
tion, and thus become a CST, or Certified Surgical Technologist. Certification is maintained by accru- 
ing 80 contact hours of approved continuing education in a consecutive six-year period. 

Work conditions 

Surgical technologists work in clean, well-lighted, cool environments in a confined area of the hospi- 
tal or other institutions. They need physical stamina in order to work under stressful conditions. Some 
surgical procedures last for several hours. An excellent job attendance record is necessary in order to 
become a responsible member of the surgical team. 

Employment 

Many surgical technologists are employed in hospital operating rooms, delivery rooms, cast rooms, 
emergency departments, ambulatory care areas, and central supply departments. Some serve in man- 
agement roles in surgical services departments. In the private scrub role, they are employed directly 
by surgeons, while others work as first/surgical assistants. They are utilized in clinics and surgicen- 
ters; in ophthalmologists, physicians, and dentists offices; and in home health care. Some may also be 
licensed practical nurses. 

Starting pay range 

Average starting pay is $10.50 to $13 per hour. Additional differential is possible depending upon 
shift hours and on-call hours worked. 

Length of program 

Study requires two years (five semesters). Graduates receive an Associate of Applied Science degree 
in Surgical Technology. 



162 



Class starts 

First-year students can begin the program in any semester. Second-year students will begin study 
Monday through Friday in the fall semester (August). 

Number of students accepted per class 

This number is based upon the number of clinical training sites available at time of clinical. 

Physical criteria - In compliance with the American Disabilities Act 

• Vision - correct to 20/20 

• Hearing - correct to normal with amplification listening to sounds 

• Haptic - related to sense of touch; within normal limi ts 

• Manual dexterity - able to perform manipulative skills with speed, dexterity and 
agility 

• Physical strength - able to lift with no restrictions 

• Physical mobility - able to climb stairs, bend and stretch 



Admission criteria 

To be considered for admission into the clinical portion of the program you must 

complete the steps by May 1 . Students who have completed the following steps will be invited to 

interview with the admissions committee. 

1 . Complete an Ivy Tech application for admission into the college and submit it to the admissions 
office. 

2. Submit high school transcript or GED and previous college transcripts to the admissions office. 
These may be mailed. 

3. Complete ASSET test if required. Students must complete with a "C" or better any remedial 
courses prior to taking college-level courses. Absolutely no waivers will be granted for foundation 
courses if ASSET scores are low. 

4. Complete all General Education courses and Technical Core courses coded as HHS with a "C" or 
better. 

5. Mandatory meeting with program chair in April. Dates are posted. 

6. PSB Test is required. Deadline is April. Taken before selection of candidates in May for fall 
classes. 

7. Candidates for fall class interviewed in June. 



CD 
S 



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V> 



163 



Visual Communications 



Specialties: 

Graphic Design 
Multimedia 

Students entering the Visual Communications program are exposed to a broad technical core of cours- 
es representing key topics such as organizing the visual field, color theory and application, image 
acquisition and manipulation, the computer as a powerful tool, the professional visual artist as a busi- 
ness person and the exit portfolio. 

The Indianapolis program offers an Associate of Applied Science degree with specialties in the areas 
of graphic design and multimedia. 

The program also offers various Associate of Science degrees depending on the articulating institu- 
tion. 

The college is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Universities. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science - 66 credits 

Associate of Science - see program advisor for curriculum 

Average Salary 

In central Indiana salary ranges will vary depending on years of experience, specialty, and exit portfo- 
lio but generally will be between $25,000 and $39,000 annually. 



164 



Associate of Applied Science 



To receive this degree, you must earn 66 credits. 



General Education Core 

HSS 143 Speech 

HEW 101 

MAT 111 

SPS 101 

XXX XXX 



XXX 



XXX 



English Composition I 
Intermediate Algebra 
Physical Science 
HUM/SOC/SCI Elective 
HUM/SOC/SCI Elective 



Technical Core 

*VIS 101 

VIS 102 

*VIS 115 

VIS 201 

VIS 205 

VIS 207 



Fundamentals of Design 
Fundamentals of Imaging 
Introduction to Computer Graphics 
Electronic Imaging 
Business Practices for Visual Artists 
Portfolio Preparation 



Choose one of the following specialties: 

Graphic Design Specialty Core 

* ART 111 Drawing for Visualization 



ART 


112 


Electronic Layout 


ART 


114 


Graphic Design 


*ART 


115 


Typography 


ART 


116 


Electronic Illustration 


ART 


217 


Advanced Graphic Design 


Regional Core 






ART 


117 


Production 


ART 


202 


Special Projects 


VIS 


110 


Web Design and Authoring 


VIS 


209 


3-D Rendering and Animation OR 


VIS 


288 


Advanced Web Animation 


Multimedia Specialty Core 


*PHO 


106 


Studio Practices 


VIS 


103 


Interactive Media I 


VIS 


105 


Video and Sound 1 


VIS 


209 


3-D Rendering and Animation 


ART 


115 


Typography 


ART 


116 


Electronic Illustration 


Regional Core 






ART 


202 


Special Projects 


VIS 


110 


Web Design and Authoring 


VIS 


206 


Interactive Media II 


VIS 


288 


Advanced Web Animation 



18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



18 credits 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 



18 credits 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

12 credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



■1' 

;;. 



* Courses marked do not require a prerequisite. 



© 
m 



165 



ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II, ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College n, MAT 044 - Mathematics, or demon- 
strated competencies. Introduces the fundamental principles, techniques, and tools of accounting. Presents the mechanics of the accounting cycle 
including collecting, recording, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting information pertaining to service and mercantile enterprises. Covers inter- 
nal control, deferred charges, notes and interest, valuation of receivables, payrolls, inventory, and plant assets. 

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Continues the study of accounting to include partnership and corporate accounting systems. 
Covers preparation and analysis of financial statements and long-term liabilities and investments. Introduces cost, managerial, branch, and non- 
profit accounting techniques. 

ACC 105 Income Tax I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I (or) with program advisor approval. Offers an overview of federal and state income tax law 
for individuals including taxable income, capital gains and losses, adjustments, standard and itemized deductions, tax credits and appropriate tax 
forms. Introduces tax concepts needed by a sole proprietorship. 

ACC 106 Payroll Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Covers payroll calculating and reporting including various federal and state withholding 
taxes, employer payroll taxes, typical insurance and other arrangements affecting the preparation of payroll registers, and employees' earnings 
records. Includes computerized payroll. 

ACC 108 Career Essentials of Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic principles of accounting as utilized in a variety of office settings. Includes the principles of debit and 
credit, double-entry bookkeeping, use of journals and analyzing transactions. Covers uses of ledgers, posting procedures, petty cash, banking pro- 
cedures, payroll, depreciation, work sheets, balance sheets and income statements. 

ACC 109 Personal Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the process of setting and achieving financial goals. Emphasizes managing financial resources, budgeting for cur- 
rent expenses, projecting cash flow, and managing short- and long-term credit. Includes use of insurance to reduce risks and vehicles for saving 
and investing. 

ACC 111 Accounting Principles Lab I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in the Principles of Accounting I course. Introduces the 
touch-method of numeric input on a calculator and includes computerized problems. 

ACC 112 Accounting Principles Lab II 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 102 - Principles of Accounting H (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in the Principles of Accounting II course. Uses computer- 
ized problems. 

ACC 113 Income Tax Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 105 - Income Tax I (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning prob- 
lems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in the Income Tax I course. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 114 Payroll Accounting Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 106 - Payroll Accounting (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning 
problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in the Payroll Accounting course. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 118 Financial Concepts for Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops math skills needed in the business field and serves as a basis for course work in business. Includes the study of 
business applications using rational numbers, algebraic equations, time value of money concepts and basic statistics. 

ACC 201 Intermediate Accounting I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 102 - Principles of Accounting n. Studies accounting principles and applications at an intermediate level pertaining to the 
income statement and balance sheet, cash and short-term investments, receivables, inventories, plant assets and intangible assets, current and con- 
tingent liabilities, corrections of errors and statement of cash flows. Includes analysis of bad debts, inventory valuation, repairs and maintenance, 
depreciation of plant assets, and present value applications. 

ACC 202 Intermediate Accounting II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting I. Continues studies of Intermediate Accounting I. Includes investments, long-term debt, stock- 
holders' equity, special accounting problems and analysis, statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis. Also includes corporate capi- 
tal and treasury stock transactions, dividends, earnings per share, accounting for income taxes, correction of errors and creation of financial state- 
ments from incomplete records. 

ACC 203 Cost Accounting I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 102 - Principles of Accounting n. Examines the manufacturing process in relation to the accumulation of specific costs of 
manufactured products. Studies various cost accounting report forms, material, labor control and allocation of manufacturing costs to jobs and 
departments. 

166 



. - 



ACC 204 Cost Accounting II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 203 - Cost Accounting I. Continues Cost Accounting I. Studies the master or comprehensive budget, flexible budgeting and 
capital budgeting. Emphasizes tools for decision making and analysis. Introduces human resource accounting. 

ACC 205 Seminar in Accounting 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Allows accounting students an opportunity to pursue specific areas of interest at a more advanced level 
in accounting. 

ACC 206 Managerial Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Provides an understanding of accounting records and management decision making, with 
topics including internal accounting records and quantitative business analysis. 

ACC 207 Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Entities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I (or) with program Advisor approval. Emphasizes the similarities and differences between 
government, nonprofit and commercial accounting methods and procedures. Exposes students to the basic fund accounting cycle for the general 
fund and other special funds. 

ACC 208 Income Tax n 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 105 - Income Tax I. Continues Income Tax I. Studies procedures and problems pertaining to federal and state income tax 
laws for partnerships and corporations. Includes a review and in-depth study of concepts related to proprietorships covered in Income Tax I. 

ACC 209 Auditing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting I. Covers public accounting organization and operation including internal control, internal and 
external auditing, verification and testing of the balance sheet and operating accounts and the auditor's report of opinion of the financial state- 
ments. 

ACC 210 Money and Banking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies monetary and banking theories as they relate to present-day domestic and international problems. Topics include 
banking operations, price changes, international monetary relationships and application of monetary and fiscal policy. 

%■# 
ACC 212 Business Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces basic tools and techniques of financial analysis and management and sources of financial and economic theory as 
applied to business finance. Includes conceptual materials related to valuation, capital structure formulation and risk-return consideration. 

ACC 217 Intermediate Accounting Lab I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting I (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in Intermediate Accounting I. Uses computerized prob- 
lems. 

ACC 218 Intermediate Accounting Lab II 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 202 - Intermediate Accounting II (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in Intermediate Accounting n. Uses computerized prob- 
lems. 

ACC 219 Cost Accounting Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 203 - Cost Accounting I (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning 
problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in Cost Accounting I. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 220 Special Applications Lab I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and activities designed to accompany con- 
cepts and theories included in an accounting course. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 221 Special Applications Lab II 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and activities designed to accompany con- 
cepts and theories included in an accounting course. Uses computerized problems. 0tm 

ACC 222 Accounting Software Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 102 - Principles of Accounting n. Solves accounting problems using software similar to what is currently used in business. 
Includes installation, operation and analysis of an accounting software package. 

ACC 223 Advanced Topics in Accounting 3 Credits a 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Discusses topics of current interest in accounting. Focuses on special interest projects for students in 
accounting. Includes trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars. 



167 



ACC 225 Integrated Accounting Software 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition, MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or equivalent or advisor approval, ACC 201 - Intermediate 
Accounting I, ACC 203 - Cost Accounting, OAD 218 - Spreadsheets or corequisite with advisor approval. Integrated accounting software pack- 
age^) will be used to illustrate computerized accounting practices. The general ledger will be integrated with accounts receivable, accounts 
payable and other accounting modules. 

ACC 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Provides the opportunity to work at a job site specifically related to a student's career objectives. Provides 
on-the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

ACC 281-294 Special Topics in Accounting 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of 
interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ACC 298 Field Study/Cooperative Education 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in an Associate Degree Program. Must have permission from a Program Supervisor. The student works at a job 
site that is specifically related to his/her career objectives. The course is a field project within the framework of actual work experience in 
accounting. 

AEC 100 Elements of Economics 3 Credits 

An introductory course intended primarily for students who need only one semester of economics. A survey of microeconomics, macroeconom- 
ics, international economics, comparative economic systems, historical development of economic thought. 3 lecture hours. 

AEC 201 Microeconomics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 011 and Mat 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater and SAT Math score of 
(R)330 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A descriptive and analytical study of the market economy, including market structures, 
pricing, and distribution and determination of wealth and income. 3 lecture hours. 

AEC202 Macroeconomics 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 011, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. 
Recommended prerequisite: AEC 201. A descriptive and analytical study of fundamental concepts of our national economy. It includes an 
analysis of the determination and fluctuations in national income and employment, monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade and 
finance. Economic analysis of monetary and fiscal policies is stressed. 3 lecture hours. 

AFS 101 Fire Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the history of firefighting, identifies the types of apparatus and fire protection systems and analyzes the fire prob- 
lem in general. Provides a basis for the chemical and hazardous properties of combustion and the related by-products. 

AFS 102 Fire Apparatus and Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines in detail the types of apparatus in use today. Studies pumpers, aerials, elevating platforms and special apparatus. 
Utilizes National Fire Protection Association standards in identifying the proper responses for a given situation. Includes study of apparatus 
placement on an emergency incident, types of pumps, tests, equipment, drafting, relay, nozzles, fittings and hose lays and maintenance on vari- 
ous types of apparatus. 

AFS 103 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Prepares the student to make responsible decisions concerning fire ground strategies and tactics at the company level. Uses 
various priority scenarios, including preparing for incident command and commanding the initial response. Emphasizes company operations with 
basic command decisions. 

AFS 104 Building Construction Fire Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the design principles involved in the protection of a structure from fire involvement. Studies the signs, symptoms 
and indicators of partial or total building collapse during firefighting operations. Includes the study of legislative codes and laws concerning 
building design, building fire safety, classification of building construction and blueprint reading. 

AFS 105 Fire/Arson Investigation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the responsibilities of the firefighter, the investigator and the department in fire scene investigations, fire cause 
and loss, collection and preservation of evidence and determination of fire origin. Emphasizes the application and assistance of various scientific 
aids that assist in the investigation. 

AFS 108 Fire Prevention/Inspection 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the function of the fire inspector and the organization of the fire prevention unit. Emphasizes identifying codes 
and regulations utilized by the inspector with particular use of the Indiana Fire Code. Includes the legal authority of fire prevention principles, 
application of the fire code and sound management principles as applied to a bureau. 

AFS 109 Fire Department Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Surveys specifications of firefighting apparatus, equipment, protective clothing, facilities and all other sources of materials 
necessary to a fire department. Study includes the writing of Standard Operating Guides (SOGs) and blueprint readings. 



168 



AFS 201 Fire Protection Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a general introduction to fire alarm monitoring devices and extinguishing systems. Develops a strong base for fire 
protection or commercial applications. Covers fire extinguishing agents, portable fire extinguishers, carbon dioxide systems, dry chemical sys- 
tems, halogenated systems/foam systems, explosive suppression systems, thermal/smoke/flame detection systems and building monitoring sys- 
tems. Covers standpipe and sprinkler systems. 

AFS 202 Fire Service Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the principles and functions of administrative and management personnel in the fire service. Topics discussed 
include departmental organizations, administrative and management procedures, personnel selection, line and staff functions, communications, 
the fire company unit, public relations and current problems in administration. 

AFS 204 Fire Service Hydraulics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies compressible fluids including fluid properties, principles of fluid statics, flow system principles, pipe friction and 
head loss, flow measurements, pumps and other appliances and hydraulic devices. Relates applications to fire protection, water supply and foam 
systems. 

All! 125 History of American Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 01 1 , or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. This 
course will examine the technological development of the modern world and especially emphasizes the United States. Emphasis will be given not 
only to the inventions themselves but the reasons why such technology was needed and what influence the technology has had on our society. 
Major topics examined will include power sources, railroads, the automobile, ships, aviation, communications and the development of military 
technology and tactics. 3 lecture hours. 

All! 131 Survey of European History I 3 Credits 

A survey of European history up to 1600, the development of ancient civilizations, the rise and fall of ancient empires, the origin and growth of 
the Christian church, politics and civilization of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation. 3 lecture hours. 

AHI 132 Survey of European History II 3 Credits 

A survey of European history dealing with Commercial Revolution; absolutism, the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; the industrial devel- 
opments of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; politics and wars of the twentieth century; and contemporary economics, social, and cultural 
change. 3 lecture hours. 

AHI 139 American History I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 031 or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. The 
colonial period; causes and results of the American Revolution; the development of the federal system of government; the growth of democracy; 
early popular American culture; territorial expansion; slavery and its effects; sectionalism; causes and effects of the Civil War; Reconstruction, 
political and economic. 3 lecture hours. 

AHI 140 American History H 3 Credits fjfjjj 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 03 1 and HEW 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement 
test scores. Industrial growth of the nation and its effects, agrarian and urban discontent and attempts at reform, World War I, the Roaring 
Twenties, social and governmental changes of the thirties, World War II and its consequences, the growth of the federal government, social and 
political upheaval in the sixties and seventies, and the conservatism of the eighties. 3 lecture hours. 

AHI 235 World Civilization I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 032 and HEW 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement 
test scores. The development of early civilizations of the Eastern Hemisphere, the civilizations of Greece and Rome, the rise and growth of 
Christianity and Islam, early Oriental history, medieval Europe, the Renaissance and Reformation, power politics and diplomacy, the expansion 
of Europe and its effect on various civilizations, scientific and intellectual developments to 1650. 3 lecture hours. 

Am 236 World Civilization H 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. 
Seventeenth Century absolutism, science and economics, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution; Romanticism, the Industrial Revolution; 
revolutions of the nineteenth century; colonialism and imperialism and their effects on under-developed areas; the prelude to World War I and the 
war itself; twentieth century world politics and the cold war; independence movements in Africa and Asia; recent social and cultural develop- 
ments. 3 lecture hours. 



«c-% : 



AMS 100 Basic Auto Care 3 Credits 

Provides basic instruction in auto maintenance for the automobile owner. Covers routine maintenance, economical operation, elimination of 

objectionable noises, care of interior and exterior appearance, warranty regulations and emergency road procedures. 

AMS 101 Steering and Suspension Systems 3 Credits w* 

This first year, introductory course will study steering and suspension systems commonly used on modern vehicles. Students will study steering 
and suspension components, power steering units, the principles of four-wheel alignment, tire repair and wheel balancing. The course will 
emphasize professional methods of diagnosis and repair for related components. 

AMS 105 Powertrain Service 3 Credits 

This introductory course will study driveline theory and in-car service procedures. Theory and overhaul procedures related to the drive shaft and 
axle assemblies for front and rear wheel drive vehicles are included as well. Removal and installation of manual and automatic drivetrains will 
be covered. 

169 



AMS 107 Engine Principles and Design 3 Credits 

This introductory course introduces engine dynamics, theory of engine operation and characteristics of engine design. Studies R & R, visual 
inspection, precision measuring, gaskets, lubricants, sealants, coolants of modern engines and engine service. 

AMS 113 Electrical and Electronics I 3 Credits 

This class introduces the fundamentals of electricity and automotive electronics. Extensive use of digital multimeters and circuit troubleshooting 
is covered. Emphasis is placed on understanding and utilizing electrical diagrams. Starting and charging systems are presented. 

AMS 119 Engine Design and Performance I 3 Credits 

An introductory course about the systems of an internal combustion engine. The basics of ignition, fuel, emission, and mechanical system opera- 
tions will be presented. Basic test procedures will be introduced. Basics of computer engine controls will be explained. Basic service and 
replacement procedures will be covered. 

AMS 121 Braking Systems 3 Credits 

Theory, service and repair of automotive braking systems and their components. Emphasis on hydraulic theory, the repair and service of system 
components, including anti-lock and traction control systems. 

AMS 123 Electrical and Electronics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AMS 113 Electrical and Electronics I or Advisor Approval. This intermediate course will study common automotive electrical sys- 
tems. The topics for this course include; function, construction, principles of operation, and troubleshooting techniques for the various automotive 
electrical and electronic systems. Diagnosis and repair of system circuits and components using proper diagnostic techniques will be emphasized. 

AMS 125 Manual Drivetrains 3 Credits 

This introductory course covers theory, diagnosis, and overhaul procedures related to the manual transmission/transaxle, clutches, transfer cases, 
and differential assemblies. 

AMS 127 Engine Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMS 107 Engine Principles and Design or Advisor approval. This course studies precision tools, equipment, and procedures 
needed to repair today's modern engine. Repair, proper assembly, and installation techniques applicable to the modem engine are included. 

AMS 135 Automatic Transmission 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMS 105 Powertrain Service or Advisor Approval. This intermediate course studies automatic transmission theory of operation, 
diagnosis and testing, and rebuilding procedures. Theory and diagnosis of computer-controlled transmissions will also be covered. 

AMS 201 Climate Control Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMS 113 Electrical/Electronics I or Advisor Approval. This course covers air conditioning and heating systems used on modern 
vehicles. Emphasis is given to the operation and theory of the air conditioning and its components. Vacuum and electronic control circuits are 
included. Federal regulations for handling and recycling of all refrigerants will be stressed. 

AMS 209 Engine Performance II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMS 107 Engine Principles and Design, AMS 109 Engine Performance I or Advisor Approval. This course covers the diagnosis 
and repair of ignition, fuel, emission, and computer systems. Extensive coverage of manufacturer specific computer engine control and fuel 
injection systems. Topics will include OBD I OBD n, future on-board diagnostic systems. 

AMS 219 Engine Performance III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMS 209 Engine Performance II or Advisor Approval. This advanced course covers the diagnosis and repair of ignition, fuel, 
emission, and computer systems. Advanced coverage of manufacturer specific computer engine control and fuel injection systems will be 
stressed. Federal and state emission requirements will be covered with a focus on 5-gas exhaust analysis. Alternative fuel technology will also 
be covered. 

AMS 229 Driveability Diagnosis 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMS 123 Electrical and Electronics n, AMS 219 Engine Performance in or Advisor Approval. This advanced course is designed 
to develop a student's ability to diagnose and repair complex driveability concerns. Emphasis will be placed on following systematic diagnostic 
procedures. Students will utilize the advanced capabilities of diagnostic equipment provided. 

AMS 243 Electrical and Electronics D3 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMS 123 Electrical/Electronics n, (to be completed within the last 12 credit hours of the AAS. This course presents advanced the- 
ory and diagnosis of automotive electronic systems. It examines all major vehicle computer systems with an emphasis on the diagnosis, testing, 
and repair of these systems. This course uses lab scopes, scan tools, and graphing multimeters. 

AMS 280 CO-OP or Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Approval of Program Chairperson. This course will give qualifying students an opportunity to work at a job site that is specifical- 
ly related to their career objective. This class will provide on-the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

AMS 299 ASE Certification Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of Advisor. A course to prepare the professional automotive technician to attempt the National Institute for Automotive 
Service Excellence certification tests. All eight areas of testing will be reviewed and sample certification tests given. Lectures will stress theory 
of operation and diagnostic logic. Labs will stress professional repair and testing techniques. 



170 



ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing n and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Develops a comprehensive understanding of the close inter-relationship between 
anatomy and physiology as seen in the human organism. Introduces students to the cell, which is the basic structural and functional unit of all 
organisms, and covers tissues, integument, skeleton, muscular and nervous systems as an integrated unit. 

ANP 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Continues the study of the inter-relationships of the systems of the human body. 

ANP 201 Advanced Human Physiology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II. Provides advanced study of human physiology Emphasizes the study of the function of the 
nervous, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive and endocrine systems, and their homeostatic mechanisms and system interaction. 
Focuses laboratory exercises on clinically relevant measurement of human function. 

ANP 203 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing n and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Provides a comprehensive study of the interrelationship between anatomy and physi- 
ology from chemical to cellular to organ interactions. Provides an in-depth study of each system of the body from a viewpoint of structure as well 
as function. 

ANP 204 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 203 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Provides the remaining comprehensive study of the interrelationship between anato- 
my and physiology from chemical to cellular to organ interactions. Provides an in-depth study of each system of the body from a viewpoint of 
structure as well as function. 

APO 111 American National Government 3 Credits 

A study of federalism, theories of the origins and purposes of government and other aspects of the central government, including pressure groups, 
political parties, and the electoral process. Emphasis is also placed on constitutional backgrounds and the organization and functions of the execu- 
tive, legislative, and judicial segments of the national government. 3 lecture hours. 

APO 112 State and Local Government 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 03 1 and HEW 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement 
test scores. A study of the basic organization and historical developments of the states, cities, counties, townships, and special districts. Special 
emphasis is given to the federal relationships of the states with the central government and the struggle over states' rights. Also emphasized are 
the problems facing state and local governments in the fields of urban renewal, crime, transportation, finance, education, and governmental 
reform. 3 lecture hours. 

APO 211 Introduction to World Politics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores, and 
successful completion of APO 201, or permission of the instructor. This course is designed as a capstone course for all Pre-Law majors as a 
requirement for graduation. The course evaluates the growth of modem nation-states, the causes of conflict and war between nations, the impact 
of war and peace on modern political ideologies, and the economic and social consequences of political action. Emphasis will be placed on a 
study of current events in a global comparative perspective. The course will emphasize critical thinking and comparative analysis through essay 
and research paper evaluations built into the course format. 3 lecture hours. 

APO 220 Public Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. This 
course is designed to examine the structure and function of the bureaucratic arm of the executive branch of government. Special emphasis will 
be placed on the internal workings of government agencies of administration on the local, state, and national level. Considerable attention will be 
paid to the power exerted through these agencies. 3 lecture hours. 

APS 142 General Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 03 1 , HEW 009, and MAT 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater and SAT Math 
score of (R)330 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. Provides a general survey of the science of Psychology. It includes the study of 
research methods, biological foundations, learning processes, human development, personality and abnormal psychology. 3 lecture hours. 

APS 201 Developmental Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in APS 142. This course covers human growth and development throughout the life span. Physical, psy- 
chosocial, and cognitive influences will be examined from conception to death. 3 lecture hours. 

APS 240 Human Sexuality 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores, and 
PSYC 142. This course offers a perspective on the physiological, psychological, and sociological nature to the human sexual response. It pro- 
vides an overview of research in the field, methods of treatment and therapy for sexual problems, and a format for discussion of societal issues 
concerning sexual conduct. 3 lecture hours. 



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APS 242 Educational Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: APS 142. Presents psychological variables in learning, devoting time to factors that affect the quality and direction of teaching. 
Students consider four broad areas: the teacher—his/her preparation, goals, uses of psychology, classroom responsibilities; the students-how their 
growth affects learning and adjustment; the classroom and other learning situations; and procedures for directing classroom activities. An option- 
al lab is offered with this course. 3 lecture hours. 

APS 249 Abnormal Psychology/W/S 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores, and 
a grade of C or better in APS 142. Examines theories and research related to mental illness as well as etiology and treatment methods. 3 lecture 
hours. 

APS 280 Health Psychology 3 Credits 

An introduction to the field of health psychology with emphasis on how the mind-body interaction influences health and health related behaviors. 
The course uses the biopsychosocial model to study major illnesses, health enhancing and health damaging behaviors, and alternative "holistic" 
modalities for treatment. Focus is on the use of psychological principles to enhance health, prevent disease, identify risk factors, and shape public 
opinion. Students explore their own health and health practices as an approach to understanding health dynamics. 3 lecture hours. 

APS 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities 3 Credits 

An overview of some special needs of individuals with unusual capabilities or handicaps. Ways to help individuals achieve more fully their 
unique potential will be considered. Causes of handicaps and appropriate preventive measures will be included. 3 lecture hours. 

ARH 102 Survey of Art and Culture U 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demon- 
strated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COM- 
PASS Reading, 80-100). Surveys painting, sculpture and architectural styles from the Renaissance through the 20th Century. Emphasizes develop- 
ing analytical skills. 

ART 111 Drawing for Visualization 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces students to the tools and methods of drawing. Presents drawing as a catalyst to seeing and a way of recording 
ideas. Gives students the necessary drawing preparation for the study of graphic design. 

ART 112 Electronic Layout 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Deals with advanced issues of designing for communication. Develops creative problem solving skills. Uses the computer as 
a tool for executing layouts for client approval. Produces practical samples for student portfolios. 

ART 114 Graphic Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 101 - Fundamentals of Design. Corequisites: ART 115 - Typography. Introduces design for communication. Teaches the steps 
in design development and the difference between message and concept. Produces samples for student portfolios. 

ART 115 Typography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses the issues pertinent to the proper and creative use of type and the enhancement of communication. Covers the his- 
tory of type, typographic terminology, design, copyfitting attention to aesthetics, common sense and how we read. 

ART 116 Electronic Illustration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction in illustration techniques using computer software designed for creating illustrations, technical drawings, 
logos, packaging, maps, charts and graphs. Emphasis is on preparing effective, creative illustrations for various media applications in an efficient, 
productive manner. 

ART 117 Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Focuses on the hand assembly of art and type for the printer's camera. Covers production terminology, printing 
process, hand preparation of illustrative materials for reproduction and preparation of mechanical art using hand skills. Produces samples for stu- 
dent portfolios. 

ART 202 Special Projects I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Accommodates student interest in specific areas or in areas where there is a need to strengthen skills. Requires performance 
and completed work to be portfolio quality and reflect applicability to the main areas of the program. 

ART 203 Independent Study I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with opportunities to design projects for specific areas of interest. Requires the project plan to be approved 
by the instructor. Restricts work to student program area and requires it to be portfolio quality. 

ART 205 Special Projects II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides specific experience in selected areas. Recommends completion of two projects. Requires instructor approval for 
additional projects. 

ART 206 Independent Study II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Builds skills in specific areas of a visual communications program or a related program such as marketing, advertising, and 
externship or supervision. Requires instructor approval for program projects. Requires program chairperson's approval to elect non-program 
coursework. 

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ART 210 Illustration Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops dexterity in the application of transparent and opaque media. 

ART 217 Graphic Design II 3 Credits Prerequisites: ART 112 - Electronic Layout. Provides experience with advanced design projects which com- 
municate a common theme through several different media. Provides opportunity for students to work in a team environment. 

ART 218 Digital Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses issues of preparing camera-ready art electronically. Topics covered are preparing computer files for service bureau 
output, scanning and printing resolution, color matching and color models, trapping, and computer system operations and troubleshooting. 

ASO 154 Cultural Anthropology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demon- 
strated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COM- 
PASS Reading, 80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Surveys the variety of social and cultural developments within the human family. Various 
cultural types and major societal structures such as kinship terminology, patterns of production and consumption and social institutions will be 
dealt with in a variety of cultural settings. 

ASO 245 Cultural Diversity 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEW 101 - English Composition and ASO 151 - Introduction to Sociology. Provides students with an opportunity to explore then- 
own ethnic roots. Increases understanding of the main ethnic groups in the United States: Appalachians, Native Americans, Afro Americans, 
Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders and Hispanics. The social and religious impact on the cultural integration of these groups will be introduced. 
Discussions on how these aspects of the United States culture may affect international dialogues will also be included. 
ASO 252 Social Problems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ASO 151 - Introduction to Sociology. Introduces some of the more complex and important problem areas in the American social 
context and includes a presentation of contemporary thinking relative to the identification, analysis and alleviation of these problems. 

ASO 253 Introduction to Social Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ASO 151 - Introduction to Sociology and APS 142 - Introduction to Psychology. Studies human behavior in social situations. 
Processes of communication, socialization, social role, social self and social groupings are emphasized. 

ASO 261 Sociology of Relationships and Families 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demon- 
strated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COM- 
PASS Reading, 80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Examines the sociological and psychological dynamics of dating, relationships, marriage, 
family life and parenting. Emphasis will be placed on how our contemporary society and culture is affecting these institutions and customs. The 
course will also explore the impact of divorce and stepfamilies on today's lifestyles. 

ASO 151 Principles of Sociology 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 031, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. 

Presents students with generalized information about the various social processes that function in society, various analytical tools, and techniques ~ 

of applying this information to everyday living. 3 lecture hours. 

ASO 154 Cultural Anthropology 3 Credits ™f 

This is a survey of the variety of social and cultural developments within the human family. Various cultural types and major societal structures 

such as kinship terminology, patterns of production and consumption, and social institutions will be dealt with in a variety of cultural settings. 3 jkmb 

lecture hours. 

ASO 164 Introduction to Multicultural Studies 3 Credits 

This is an introductory course in the multicultural composition of the United States. The impact of and interaction between social institutions 
including the family, education, religion, economics, and government will receive attention. The development of prejudice and discrimination will 
be explored. Particular focus will be shown to cultural groups based on ethnicity and color. This course will prepare students to understand, « s 

appreciate, and work effectively with people who are different from themselves. It will also help students to value the multiple cultures from 

which they have come. 3 lecture hours. 

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ASO 245 Cultural Diversity 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores, and 
ASO 151 and HEW 101 or permission of the instructors. This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore their own ethnic roots. ^^ 
In addition, it will increase their understanding of the main ethnic groups in the United States: Appalachians, Native Americans, Afro- Americans, 
Asian-Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. The social and religious impact on the cultural integration of these groups will be introduced. ia3 
Discussions on how these aspects of United States culture may affect international dialogues will also be included. 3 class hours. 

ASO 252 Social Problems 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ASO 151. This course has as its primary aim the introduction of some of the more complex and important problem areas in the 
American social context and includes a presentation of contemporary thinkin g relative to the identification, analysis, and alleviation of these prob- 
lems. 3 lecture hours. 

ASO 253 Introduction to Social Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APO 142, ASO 151. A study of human behavior in social situations. Processes of communication, socialization, social role, social 
self and social groupings are emphasized. 3 lecture hours. 

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ASO 254 Introduction to Archaeology 3 Credits 

An exploration of archaeological sequences from beginnings of settled life to complex civilization. Particular attention is directed toward devel- 
opmental sequences and ecological adaptations. The course will also consider the pre-European societies of Indiana and adjacent areas against 
the backdrop of the archaeological and paleological records of the eastern United States. 3 lecture hours. 

ASO 261 Sociology of Relationships and Families 3 Credits 

This course is designed to examine the sociological and psychological dynamics of dating, relationships, marriage, family life and parenting. 
Emphasis will be placed on how our contemporary society and culture is affecting these institutions and customs. The course will also explore 
the impact of divorce and stepfamilies on today's lifestyles. 3 lecture hours. 

BIO 101 Introductory Biology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Introduces the basic concepts of life. Includes discussion of cellular and organismal 
biology, genetics, evolution, ecology and interaction among all living organisms. Addresses applications of biology to society. 

BIO 211 General Microbiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing D and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Presents an overview of microbiology which includes fundamentals, methods and 
materials. Introduces industrial and clinical microbiology, and special topics. 

BIO 212 General Microbiology II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIO 211 - General Microbiology and ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Presents a secondary study of bacteria, viruses, fungi, 
rickettsia and parasites. Emphasizes the study of bacterial growth and control demonstrated by serological techniques. 
BIO 065 Basic Life Sciences 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Success completion of ENG 031 - Reading Strategies for College I, and MAT 044 - Mathematics or demonstrated competency on 
reading section (ASSET 37+, COMPASS 66+) and mathematics section (ASSET 41+, COMPASS 44-100) of the assessment. Introduces the sci- 
entific method and basic concepts and terminology used in biology, microbiology, anatomy, physiology and organic chemistry which are related 
to life sciences. Prepares entering students who took no high school science or who took science several years ago for general education life sci- 
ences courses. 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the U.S. business system in relation to the nation's economy. Studies business ownership, organization principles 
and problems, management, and administration and development practices of American business enterprises. 

BUS 102 Business Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Describes the judicial system and the nature and sources of law affecting business. Studies contracts, sales and negotiable 
instruments with emphasis on Uniform Commercial Code applications. Includes appropriate remedies for breach of contract and tort liabilities. 
Examines business structures and agencies. 

BUS 103 Office Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers broad areas of administrative office services and management, including office organization, site location, layout and 

environment, records management, systems controls, and office communication services and devices. 

BUS 104 Investment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents the basis of investing, with attention to the various ways in which investment vehicles operate. 

BUS 105 Principles of Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Describes the functions of managers, including the management of activities and personnel. Focuses on application of guid- 
ance principles in management. 

BUS 108 Personal Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes management of individual financial resources for growth and maintenance of personal wealth. Covers home 
buying and mortgage financing, installment financing, life and health insurance, securities, commodities and other investment opportunities. 

BUS 110 Business Statistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Introduces students to the theory and applications of statistical inferential techniques as applied 
to business problems. The student is exposed to a software package to illustrate the extent that the computer has facilitated quantitative research. 

BUS 202 Human Resource Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUS 105 - Principles of Management Focuses on the activities of human resource management, with emphasis on employeT- 
employee relations, job analysis and evaluation, salary administration, work measurement and standards, performance appraisal and legal compli- 
ance. 

BUS 203 Business Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: 45 credit hours and/or departmental approval. Explores business operations for the self-employed or as a manager of a small busi- 
ness enterprise. Covers the role of entrepreneur and manager; selecting the appropriate business organization; developing plans and strategies for 
small, medium, and growing firms; securing financing for start-up and growing operations; exploring growth opportunities and successfully man- 
aging human and material resources. 

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BUS 204 Case Problems in Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: 45 program credit hours to include ENG 111 - English Composition and MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 112 - Functional 
Mathematics and departmental approval. Applies business concepts and principles to specific case studies or problems. 

BUS 205 Risk Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines risks faced by business firms and considers ways of handling them. Covers property, liability and personal losses, 
with attention to insurance contracts and their uses. Studies individual life, health and pension insurance, public policy, government regulations 
and social insurance programs. 

BUS 207 Introduction to International Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUS 101 - Introduction to Business and/or departmental approval. Provides an overview of the international environment within 
which business operates today. Demonstrates the global relationships between business activities and how events in one part of the world can 
influence business decisions and activities in other parts of the world. 



BUS 208 Organizational Behavior 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUS 105 - Principles of Management. Studies human behavior in organizations at the individual and group level, including the 
effect of organizational structure on behavior. Focuses on using organizational behavior concepts for developing and improving interpersonal 
skills. 



CUM 102 Chemistry D 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHM 101 - Chemistry I. Includes liquids and solids, solutions and solution concentrations, acids and bases, equilibrium, nuclear 
chemistry, and organic and biochemistry. 

CHM 061 Basic Chemistry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II and MAT 050 - Basic Algebra, or demonstrated competency 
in the reading section (ASSET 41+, COMPASS 80-100) and the algebra section (ASSET 40-55, COMPASS 41-100) of the assessment. Provides 
students with an introduction to chemistry basics. Provides instruction for students with little or no recent chemistry background, especially those 
desiring to continue in more advanced chemistry courses or other science courses. 

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BUS 209 Introduction to eBusiness 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on how eBusiness is being conducted and managed and its major opportunities, limitations, issues and risks. 
Applications to be discussed include those of business-to-consumers, business-to-business and intrabusiness. Because eBusiness is interdiscipli- 
nary, subject matter will be directed at managers, professionals and students who wish an overview of the eBusiness potential. 

BUS 210 Managerial Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra, and ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Improves deci- 
sion making skills related to the financial resources of a firm. Includes techniques of financial analysis, time value of money, capital budgeting, 
and risk. 

BUS 220 Conference Leadership Training 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Stresses the importance of the conference in business and industry. Emphasizes the practical application of the various tech- 
niques of conference leadership and an understanding of group dynamics in the conference setting. 

BUS 221 Principles of Employment 3 Credits 

Corequisites: BUS 202 - Human Resource Management. Provides an in-depth look at the employment process. Emphasizes the role of recruiting, 
selecting and training of employees. Studies in detail techniques in job analysis, behavioral interviewing and on-the-job training. 

BUS 222 Benefits Administration 3 Credits 

Corequisites: BUS 202 - Human Resource Management. Provides an in-depth look at benefits administration. Topics include vacations, holiday 
pay, insurance, retirement programs and other employee inducements. Emphasizes cost of benefits in relationship to the overall compensation 
package. Looks at the relevance of reward, recognition and pay structures. 

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BUS 223 Occupational Safety and Health 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes the importance of safety and health in the workplace. Examines the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 -™, c 
in depth with relationship to businesses and their employees. Places emphasis on effective practices, costs, labor and management responsibilities, 
health hazards, alcohol and drug abuse, worker's compensation, physical conditions and training. 

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BUS 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Gives students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. 
Provideson-the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

BUS 281-294 Special Topics in Business Administration 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of 
interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more 

CHM 101 Chemistry I 3 Credits ® 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demon- 
strated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COM- 
PASS Reading, 80-100) and MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Includes the science of chemistry and measurement, atomic theory and the periodic 
table, chemical bonding, stoichiometry and gases. 



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CIS 100 Using Windows Environment 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic concepts of Windows and Windows-based applications. The student will acquire the necessary concepts 
for accomplishing the most common tasks such as creating folders, copying, deleting and moving files from one folder to another or from a fold- 
er to an auxiliary storage medium. The student will also be introduced to such Windows applets as the NotePad and Accessories. Simple word 
processing, database, spreadsheet and communications programs will be introduced. 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated competencies, or 
advisor approval. Coequisites: Keyboarding at a rate of 25 GWAM with three-minute tuning and no more than three errors, or advisor approval. 
Introduces the physical components and operations of microcomputers. Focuses on computer literacy and provides hands-on training in three 
areas of microcomputer application software: word processing, electronic spreadsheets and database management. Use of a professional business 
integrated applications package is emphasized. 

CIS 102 Information Systems Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II, ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College n, or demonstrated competencies or 
advisor approval. Introduces information processing and programming with emphasis on hands-on computer experience. Examines the role of 
information processing in an organization, including information processing applications, computer hardware and software, internal data repre- 
sentation, stored program concepts, systems and programming design, flowcharting and data communications. Reviews the history of computers, 
related computer careers, the social impact of computers and computer security. 

CIS 104 Introduction to COBOL Programming 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming. Provides an introduction to COBOL (Common Business Oriented Language) with 
major emphasis on developing structured programming skills. Develops proficiency in applying the programming development cycle to elemen- 
tary business problems. 

CIS 105 Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Studies computer operating systems, purposes, structure, and various functions. 
Provides general understanding of how comprehensive sets of language translators and service programs, operating under supervisory coordina- 
tion of an integrated control program, form the total operating systems of a computer. 

CIS 106 Microcomputer Operating System 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Introduces the organization, structure 
and functions of an operating system for a microcomputer. Presents the student with operating system concepts such as commands, error mes- 
sages, interrupts, function calls, device drivers, structure, files and organization. Incorporates concepts into practical applications. 

CIS 107 Microcomputer Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals and CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming. Introduces a structured microcom- 
puter language. Concepts in input/output commands, arithmetic expressions, conditional control, iteration techniques and subroutines will be 
stressed. Concepts will be incorporated into the application of solving business problems. 

CIS 108 Practical Computer Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Demonstrates workstation and minicomputer operations including peripheral devices. Provides information on data process- 
ing area including job responsibilities, standards and run manuals, message control functions, documentation and back-up procedures. 

CIS 109 UNIX Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction of Microcomputers or CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems or advisor approval. Studies the UNTX 
V operating system and its use as a time-sharing operating system. Includes basic UNLX commands, use of the visual editor, the UNTX directory 
structure and file management with SHELL commands. Offers opportunities to apply skills and knowledge in a laboratory environment 

CIS 110 Basic Programming Language 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 1 13 - Logic, Design and Programming. Introduces concepts of program design and programming using the BASIC program- 
ming language, the primary language for use with microcomputers. Includes overview of basic arithmetic operations, accumulating and printing 
totals, comparing, array processing, and interactive programming. Offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment 

CIS 113 Logic, Design and Programming 3 Credits 

Corequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing n, ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated competencies, CIS 
101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals or advisor approval. Introduces the structured techniques 
necessary for efficient solution of business-related computer programming logic problems and coding solutions into a high-level language. 
Includes program flowcharting, pseudocoding, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving these problems. Covers creating file layouts, print 
charts, program narratives, user documentation and system flowcharts for business problems. Reviews algorithm development, flowcharting, 
input/output techniques, looping, modules, selection structures, file handling and control breaks. Offers students an opportunity to apply skills in 
a laboratory environment 

CIS 114 Principles of Management Information Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Corequisites: BUS 101 - Introduction to Business. Examines the functions and 
operations required to manage information for business decisions. Focuses on the use of various information technologies and tools that support 
transaction processing, decision-making, and strategic planning. The diverse information needs of different organizations within a business will 
be used as examples of practical application of MIS technology. 

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CIS 116 Introduction to Java Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None, but prefer CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming, a Windows-based class and Internet experience. This course provides 
a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts involved when using a member of a Java programming development language. The emphasis 
is on logical program design using a modular approach involving task oriented program functions. Java allows the design of an Internet user 
interface. The application is built by selecting forms and controls, assigning properties, and writing code. 

CIS 120 Programming I 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 1 13 - Ix>gic, Design, and Programming or advisor approval. Provides an introduction to business programming with the major 
emphasis on developing structured programming skills. Students will develop proficiency in applying the programming development cycle to ele- 
mentary business problems. 

CIS 201 Database Design and Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Introduces program applications in a 
database environment and includes discussion of data structures; indexed and direct file organizations; data models including hierarchical, net- 
work and relational; storage devices, data administration and analysis; design and implementation. Allows students to use database software in 
creating, modifying, retrieving and reporting from databases. Develops business application using a database language. 

CIS 202 Data Communications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Introduces concepts of data communications for computer programming students to 
build a foundation of knowledge upon which to add new technologies. 

CIS 203 Systems Analysis and Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers plus a minimum of 12 CIS credits successfully completed. Provides instruction for cre- 
ating or modifying a system by gathering details, analyzing data, designing systems to provide solutions, and implementing and maintaining the 
systems. 

CIS 204 Advanced COBOL Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 104 - Introduction to COBOL Programming. Continues topics introduced in CIS 104 - Introduction to COBOL Programming 
with more logically complex business problems. Develops a higher level of COBOL proficiency as well as greater familiarity with debugging 
techniques. Uses the structured approach through class instruction and laboratory experience. 

CIS 206 Project Development with High-Level Tools 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 201 - Database Design and Management or CIS 203 - Systems Analysis and Design. Analyzes established and evolving 
methodologies for the development of business-oriented computer information systems. Develops competencies in techniques that apply modem 
software tools to generate applications directly, without requiring detailed and highly technical program writing efforts. 



CIS 207 Microcomputer Database Management Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Presents an overview of relational, hierarchical and network database models with 
emphasis on microcomputer relational database management systems (DBMS). Provides practical experience in using database software to cre- 
ate, modify, retrieve and report. Develops business applications using the database language. 

CIS 209 Computer Business Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 201 - Database Design and Management, COM 101 - Fundamentals of Public Speaking or COM 102 - Introduction to 
Interpersonal Communication. Corequisites: CIS 203 - Systems Analysis and Design. Requires students to apply business, microcomputer, and 
communication skills within business applications. Emphasizes application of several forms of computerized information processing including 
data processing, word processing, spreadsheets, graphics, and communications. Analyzes the effects of automation on the office worker, manage- 
ment, and the work environment and requires written and oral presentations. 

CIS 210 COBOL ffl 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 204 - Advanced COBOL Programming. Emphasizes file handling techniques on tape and direct access devices and the use of 
libraries via the COBOL, CALL and COPY verbs. Introduces variant forms of the structured approach and unstructured concepts such as the GO 
TO verb. Helps students develop good programming practices and an entry-level COBOL competency. 

CIS 211 RPG Programming Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Processing Fundamentals and CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming. Provides a general introduction 
to the RPG programming language with emphasis on hands-on programming experience. Presents the most important features of the RPG lan- 
guage from input/output processing to applications requiring handling. Introduces language concepts in class lecture. Includes programming lab 
assignments. 

CIS 212 "CTC-H-" Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming or advisor approval. Provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts 
involved when using a low development language. Emphasizes one logical program design using a modular approach involving task-oriented 
program functions. Discusses the role of data types, storage classes, and addressable memory locations. 

CIS 213 Assembler Language Program 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Processing Fundamentals and CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming. Gives students a basic under- 
standing of the assembler process using IBM mainframe computers. Stresses the importance of byte-wise manipulation of data fields when using 
low-level languages. Emphasizes the actual workings of a computer during the execution of a computer program. Discusses the role of data 
types, EBCTDIC format of data storage, and addressable memory locations. 

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CIS 214 Pascal Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a basic understanding of the structured programming process necessary for successful Pascal programming. 
Emphasizes top-down program design and modularity, using Pascal procedures, functions, and independent subprograms. Discusses simple and 
advanced data types and program control aids, algorithm development, and program debugging. Provides students with a fundamental under- 
standing of good programming technique and a basic knowledge of Pascal syntax and structure. 

CIS 215 Field Study 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 30 program credits with 15 in CIS courses. Provides opportunity for a field project or research case 
study within the computer technology field. Includes collection and analysis of data and/or actual work experience in business or industry. 

CIS 216 Advanced RPG Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 211 - RPG Programming Fundamentals. Offers advanced study in the use of the RPG compiler language in solving business 
problems. Focuses on file processing methods and a working knowledge of advanced features and techniques through laboratory experience. 

CIS 217 Programming II 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming or advisor approval. Provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts 
involved when using a development language. The emphasis is on program design using a modular approach involving risk oriented program 
functions. The role of data types, storage classes, and addressable memory locations is thoroughly discussed. 

CIS 220 Shell Command Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches students how to write, test and debug shell procedures on a computer utilizing a UNIX operating system. Presents 
the shell and how it works, shell processes, variables, keyword and positional parameters, control constructs, special substitutions, pipelines, 
debugging aids, error/interrupt processing and shell command line. Offers students the opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment. 

CIS 221 Advanced "CTC++" Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 212 - "C'7"C++" Programming. Continues those topics introduced in "C" Language Progra mmin g with emphasis on array pro- 
cessing, file processing and advanced debugging techniques. Provides the opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment. This class will 
also introduce the concept of object oriented programming using the C++ computer language. Differences between C++ and classical C program- 
ming will be addressed. 

CIS 223 integrated Business Software 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or program advisor approval. Presents knowledge of integrated microcomputer software 
concepts. Students design a complete business system utilizing all parts of an integrated microcomputer software package which can share the 
same data and manipulate it. Includes use of word processing, electronic spreadsheets, graphics, databases and command languages. 

CIS 224 Hardware and Software Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems. Presents an in-depth analysis of the components of a computer system and their rela- 
tionship to each other. Includes concepts of parallel and serial connectivity, installation and maintenance of software, peripheral devices, interface 
cards and device drivers. Analyzes realistic hardware/software problems encountered in the workplace and techniques and procedures used to 
implement solutions. 

CIS 225 Advanced Database Management Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 201 - Database Design and Management or CIS 207 - Microcomputer Database Management Systems. Continues CIS 207 
Microcomputer Database Management Systems. Emphasizes the development of advanced applications in database management. 

CIS 227 Topics in Information Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Discusses topics of current interest in information management. Includes examples 
from production, operations, accounting, finance, marketing, sales and human resources. Focuses on special interest projects. Utilizes field trips, 
guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars. 

CIS 228 Cooperative Education 1-9 Credits 

Prerequisites: Have completed 50% of required major course credits, with at least a 2.5 average in the occupational field of study, as well as a 2.5 
overall scholastic average. Provides students with the opportunity to apply concepts learned in the classroom to actual work situations. Requires 
program Advisor approval. 

CIS 229 Seminar I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Discusses topics of current interest in computerized information management with an emphasis on the 
application of information management skills during lab time. Various seminar topics may be identified and offered each term under this course 
number. 

CIS 230 Seminar H 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Discusses topics of current interest in computerized information management with emphasis on applica- 
tion of information management skills during lab time. Identifies and offers various seminar topics each term under this course number. 

CIS 231 Structured Query Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 201 - Database Design and Management. SQL is now a dominant language used in mainframe, mini, and microcomputer data- 
bases (Access, dBASE, paradox, DB2, FoxPro, Oracle, SQL Server, and Btrieve) by diverse groups such as home computer owners, small busi- 
nesses, large organizations and programmers. It acts as a bridge between the user, the database management system, the data tables and transac- 
tions involving all three. 

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CIS 232 Visual Basic Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming and previous experience with Windows-based software. Provides a basic understand- 
ing of fundamental concepts involved when using a member of a Windows programming development language. Emphasizes logical program 
design using a modular approach involving task-oriented program functions. Allows the design of a Windows user interface. 

CIS 232 Visual Basic Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming and previous experience with Windows-based software. Provides a basic understand- 
ing of fundamental concepts involved when using a member of a Windows programming development language. Emphasizes logical program 
design using a modular approach involving task-oriented program functions. Allows the design of a Windows user interface. 

CIS 233 Graphic User Interfaces: Windows 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Provides a foundation of fundamental concepts in the use of Windows-type software. 
Explores the Windows operating system, accessories and various applications. Develops a proficiency with Windows operations including cus- 
tomizing the environment, integrating applications and managing files. 

CIS 235 Network Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating System and Windows-based training is recommended. Corequisites: CIS 202 - Data 
Communications. Studies local area networks, their topologies and functions. Provides a general understanding of the basic LAN protocols. 
Covers utilization of application software using a local area network to share resources among network members, transferring files between 
users, set-up and administration of a network, identification of hardware and software needs and LAN-to-mainframe connectivity. 



CIS 240 A+ Certification I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals or program chair approval. Consists of 
the first of two courses required to train for the A+ certification program. Presents microcomputer knowledge and skills in detail. Presents an in- 
depth study of the components of a computer system and their relationships to each other. Includes all the concepts required to prepare for the 
A+ certification tests. Students analyze realistic hardware/software problems and perform several lab processes to assist in learning techniques 
and procedures to implement solutions. 

CIS 241 A+ Certification II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals or program chair approval. Consists of 
the second of two courses required to train for the A+ Certification program. Presents microcomputer knowledge and skills in detail. Presents an 
in depth study of the components of a computer system and their relationships to each other. Includes all the concepts required to prepare for the 
A+ certification tests. Students analyze realistic software/hardware problems and perform several lab processes to assist in learning techniques 
and procedures to implement solutions. 

CIS 243 Novell Network Administration I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems. Corequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communications or CIS 235 - Network Fundamentals. 
Introduces the organization, structure, functions, and administration of a network operating system. Trains the student in administration of a local 
area network. Presents network operating system concepts such as file and shared printing, data protection, application installation and electronic 
messaging. Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CIS 244 Novell Network Administration II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 243 - Novell Network Administration I. Introduces file server management, maintenance, installation and configuration con- 
cepts and techniques. Trains the student in the tasks required for management and administration of a local area network file server. Presents 
information on various installation techniques. Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CIS 245 Networking Technologies Concepts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 243 - Novell Network Administration I. Introduces the basic concepts of computer networking. Describes the services provid- 
ed by a network and explains the different media used to access network services. The OSI model of computer networks is introduced and a 
description of each of its layers is provided. The OSI model is compared to several different network systems to demonstrate how the network 
services fit into the model. 

CIS 246 Novell Network Hardware Service and Support 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 244 - Novell Network Administration n. Provides hands-on experience in troubleshooting various components of a computer 
system including memory, hard disk sub-systems, network interface cards and network cabling. Focuses on the prevention, diagnosis and resolu- 
tion of hardware-related networking problems. Several hands-on labs are used to allow the student to develop a diagnostic ability. 

CIS 247 Novell Network Administration HI 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 246 - Novell Network Hardware Service and Support. Introduces the student to a mixed operating systems network. Introduces 
network directory services. Teaches the student how to inter-network two different network operating systems. Directory services troubleshoot- 
ing and network performances issues are covered. Also covers advanced printing techniques and print server configuration. 

CIS 251 Advanced Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating System. Studies advanced topics in operating systems as they apply to Networking applica- 
tion. 

CIS 252 Web Site Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals or program advisor approval. Creates a 
business or personal World Wide Web presence and uses Web technology. Creates a professional and successful World Wide Web site. 

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CIS 253 Graphic Image Lab 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or program advisor approval. Introduces students to computer graphic design. The 
beginning focus of the course is on basic computer terminology and use, mastering fundamental skills, and developing efficient working styles. 
These skills are then developed by creating animation, graphics presentations, and graphics manipulations. 

CIS 254 GUI and WWW 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Previous knowledge of Windows 3.X - Office software; CIS 233 - Graphic User Interfaces: Windows and CIS 232 'Visual Basic 
Programming helpful. Provides a foundation of fundamental concepts in the use of GUI software. Employs a document-centric approach using all 
the main applications of Windows-Based Operating Systems and Windows-Based Applications, but integrates the use of the World Wide Web to 
increase the quality of the output. 

CIS 255 Network Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems or program advisor approval. Provides access to many client computers through the 
hardware and software on each computer. Delivers a view of four primary Network Operating Systems used in the workplace today. It also pro- 
vides a detailed study with hands-on laboratory exercises that promote an understanding and installation of Network Operating Systems. A spe- 
cial emphasis on Novell (v3.12), (v.4.01), Microsoft NT (v.3.51 and 4.0) and Unix (Linux) are provided. Students leam how to plan and install 
the operating system and client workstations. 

CIS 256 LAN/Data Communications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems or program advisor approval, Windows-based training is recommended. Draws on 
practical examples to explain technical concepts of data communications. Provides a practical understanding of relevant terminology, concepts, 
hardware, software, protocols, architectures and other information needed to assist the student in grasping the ever-changing world of data com- 
munications. In addition, it provides a look at networks (LAN) and wide area networks (WAN) and explores planning and analyzing communica- 
tions systems. 

CIS 258 Network Communication and Connectivity 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communications or CIS 235 - Network Fundamentals and program advisor approval. Although networking hard- 
ware and software are constantly changing, this course presents a detailed view and analysis of the mechanics and protocols used in computer 
networks. TCP/IP protocols have taken over where OSI protocols have left off. This course attempts to analyze the TCP/IP model and its close 
association with the Internet and ATM networks. 

CIS 263 Windows NT Network Administration I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems. Corequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communications or CIS 235 - Network Fundamentals. 
Introduces the organization, structure, functions, and administration of a network operating system. Trains the student in administration of a local 
area network. Presents network operating system concepts such as file and shared printing, data protection, application installation and electronic 
messaging. Concepts will be incorporated into practical application. 

CIS 264 Windows NT Network Administration II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 263 - Windows NT Network A(Iministration I. Introduces file server management, maintenance, installation and configuration 
concepts and techniques. Trains the student in the task required for management and administration of a local area network file server. Presents 
information on various installation techniques. Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CIS 266 Windows NT Network Hardware Service and Support 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 264 - Wmdows NT Network Administration n. Provides hands-on experience in troubleshooting various components of a 
computer system including memory, hard disk subsystems, network interface cards and network cabling. Focuses on the prevention, diagnosis 
and resolution of hardware-related networking problems. Several hands-on labs are used to allow the students to develop a diagnostic ability. 

CIS 273 Network Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems. Corequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communications or CIS 235 - Network Fundamentals. 
Introduces the organization, structure, functions and administration of a network operating system. Trains the student in administration of local 
area networks. Presents network operating system concepts such as file and shared printing, data protection, application installation and electronic 
messaging. Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CIS 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on- 
the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

CIS 281-294 Special Topics in Computer Information Systems 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of 
interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College n or 
demonstrated compete... through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100). Introduces fundamental concepts and skills for effective public speaking, including preparation and delivery of 
informative and persuasive presentations. Includes instruction in the use of visual aids and critical listening. 



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COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing n and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100). Focuses on the process of interpersonal communication as a dynamic and complex system of interactions. Stresses 
the importance of understanding and applying interpersonal communication theory in work, family and social relationships. Uses lecture/discus- 
sion format. 

CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the purposes, functions and history of law enforcement, courts and correctional systems. Explores the interrelation- 
ships and responsibilities of the criminal justice system. 



CRJ 103 Cultural Awareness 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies American criminal justice problems and systems in historical and cultural perspectives. Discusses social and public 
policy factors affecting crime. Emphasizes multidisciplinary and multicultural perspectives. 

CRJ 105 Introduction to Criminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews crime and delinquency, types of offenses and offenders and the basic units of the criminal justice system, and intro- 
duces the role of law enforcement in prevention and control of deviant behavior. 



CRJ 123 Juvenile Justice Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the nature, etiology and extent of juvenile crime, functions and jurisdictions of juvenile agencies, and juvenile 
processing, detention and case disposition. 

CRJ 131 Community Based Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews programs for convicted offenders that are alternatives to incarceration, including diversion, house arrest, restitution, 
community service and other topics. Reviews post-incarceration situations, probation and parole. 

CRJ 133 Legal Issues in Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores sentencing and incarceration, legal issues applicable to probation and parole, objectives of correctional processes 
and influences in correctional decision making. 

CRJ 202 Adjudication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes topics related to the adjudication process in criminal cases including arraignments and preliminary hearings, sup- 
pression hearings, trials, sentencing, juvenile court and probation and parole. Reviews the role of criminal justice personnel in court processes. 

CRJ 203 Police and Community Relations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces police-community relations and examines trends, practices and social and individual effects of police work. 
Emphasizes problem solving, conflict management and police-community interaction. 

CRJ 205 Procedural Criminal Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 211 - Criminal Law. Covers theory and practice of procedural criminal law. Introduces law of arrest, search and seizure, con- 
fessions, suspect identification and surveillance. Emphasizes Indiana criminal law. 

CRJ 222 Special Issues in Youth Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ECE 204 - Families in Transition, HMS 215 - Juvenile Delinquency. Examines issues commonly encountered in the youth care field. 

CRJ 223 Special Issues in Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 105 - Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation Services, HMS 204 - Human Services Internship Seminar 2, CRJ 131 - 
Community- Based Corrections. Investigates topics of special interest related to corrections with an emphasis on the classification and treatment 
of inmates. Topics may vary to reflect contemporary corrections issues. 

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CRJ 111 Introduction to Traffic Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the role of law enforcement in traffic safety, traffic administration, traffic laws, accident investigation, police safe- 
ty and patrol practices. 

CRJ 113 Criminal Investigations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the organization and functions of investigative agencies, basic considerations in criminal investigations, collection 
and preservation of physical evidence and elements of legal proof in the submission of evidence. Introduces investigation of specific types of 
offenses. 

CRJ 115 Criminalistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRJ 113 - Criminal Investigations. Introduces crime scene procedure, theory and practice in evidence collections, transportation, 
identification, processing and the chain of custody. 

CRJ 118 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces fundamental law enforcement operations and organization. Includes the evolution of law enforcement at federal, 
state and local levels. 

CRJ 121 Juvenile Law and Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes an overview of the juvenile justice system, treatment and prevention programs and special areas and laws unique to 
juveniles. 



o 



CRJ 280 Internship 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRJ 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems, CRJ 103 - Cultural Awareness, LEG 211 - Criminal Law. Provides fieldwork 
experience in an approved social, educational, law enforcement, corrections or other criminal justice organization. 

DCT 104 Mechanical Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics, DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals or advisor approval. Introduces the set concept of working draw- 
ings both in detailing and assembly. Presents fastening devices, thread symbols and nomenclature, surface texture symbols, classes of fits and the 
use of parts lists, titles and revision blocks. Introduces the basics of product design and the design process. 

DCT 105 Architectural Design and Layout 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Focuses on the architectural drawings of commercial or industrial buildings. Covers problems of 
space planning, design, materials, HVAC systems and construction methods. Develops working drawings and presentation drawings. Requires 
oral presentations and discussions. Requires students to complete research on a limited number of construction materials and methods. 
DCT 108 Residential Drafting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Covers residential planning and drafting. Includes interior planning, structural design, and development of work- 
ing drawings. Provides opportunity for students to design a residence using accepted building standards from information given in class. 

DCT 109 Construction Materials and Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces various construction materials, composition and application. Studies specifications of materials, construction con- 
tracts, and applications required in the building industry. 

DCT 110 Architectural Rendering 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Presents a survey and history of pictorial drawings. Studies light and color, rendering media, and 
application of different techniques and media through a series of exercises. 

DCT 112 CAD Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Includes advanced dimensioning techniques using the dimension variables for GDT and ordinate 

dimensioning, grips, xrefs, aligning auxiliary views, paragraph text importing and editing and the use of system and AutoCAD variables. 

DCT 113 Intermediate CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals, TEC 104 - Computer Fundamentals for Technology. Continues study of CAD fundamentals. 
Focuses on advanced CAD features and various methods of customizing CAD systems. 

DCT 201 Schematics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics, DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Corequisites: DCT 206 - Mechanical and Electrical Equipment. 
Presents the systematic layout of various types of schematic drawing done by a draftsperson. Requires students to prepare finished drawings for 
manufacture or installation of plumbing, heating, electrical, electronic and fluid-power type drawing. 

DCT 202 CAD Customization and Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Covers use of computer language to program commands for CAD. 

DCT 204 Architectural CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Presents advanced computer-aided design topics including architectural design. Includes all neces- 
sary drawings needed for the construction process. 

DCT 205 Introduction to Plastics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Introduces students to the major plastic processing industries, techniques, and most widely used 
plastic polymers, their applications and properties. 

DCT 206 Mechanical and Electrical Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Focuses on mechanical and electrical requirements for a 
structure. Studies electrical load calculations, wire sizing and circuits. Calculates plumbing requirements, fixture units and pipe sizing. Includes 
hearing systems, duct layout and sizing. 

DCT 207 Die Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 104 - Product Drafting, TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes. Studies the drafting, detailing and design of blanking, piercing 
and forming dies. Covers material reaction to shear, cutting clearances and nest gauging. 

DCT 208 Structural Design and Detailing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics, DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals, DCT 109 - Construction Materials and Specifications and Advisor 
approval. Focuses on detailing commercial structural members, their connections, materials and methods of construction. Concentrates on tradi- 
tional materials, such as reinforced concrete, masonry, steel and timber. 

DCT 209 Estimating 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 204 - Architectural CAD, DCT 108 - Residential Drafting. Introduces estimating procedures used in the building industry. 
Studies material takeofls, estimating overhead expenses, contingencies, labor and equipment. Involves the use of computers to generate takeoffs 
and to set pricing. 



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DCT 210 Surveying 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry/Trigonometry or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Introduces surveying equipment, procedures for per- 
forming measurements, turning angles, determining grades and other field applications. Covers surveying techniques and computations using the 
level, chain and transit in calculating areas, lines and grades. 

DCT 211 Commercial Structures I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 204 - Architectural CAD, DCT 108 - Residential Drafting. Focuses on planning and drawing commercial structures. Uses a 
presentation drawing and working drawing for concrete structures and steel structures. 

DCT 212 Commercial Structures H 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 211 - Commercial Structures I. Focuses on planning and drawing commercial structures. Uses working drawings for pre-engi- 
neered and concrete/steel structures. 

DCT 213 CAD Mapping 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals, DCT 210 - Surveying I. Covers the concepts of map making with computer-aided drafting and typi- 
cal drafting media found in the industry. Studies civil engineering applications of mapping procedures including profiles, topography and site plans. 

DCT 214 Machine Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 104 - Product Drafting, MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Presents practical solutions 
to mechanical design problems. Studies the design of machine elements including shafts, bearings, keys, pins and springs. Includes the geometry 
and drafting of cams and gears and the study of linkages. 

DCT 215 Electronic Drafting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics and DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Introduces students to electronic schematics, drill indexing, and 
printed circuit board design. Emphasizes the creation and manipulation of basic symbols, connection diagrams, block and logic diagrams, includ- 
ing the use of figure parts and data extract. 

DCT 216 Jig and Fixture Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 104 - Product Drafting and TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes. Introduces the processes of drafting and design as applied to 
tooling. Emphasizes tooling, locators, supports, holding devices, clearances and design as it pertains to jig and fixtures. 

DCT 217 Design Process and Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 104 - Product Drafting and DSN 222 - Strength of Materials. Provides the student an opportunity to apply all previously 
acquired knowledge in product drafting to the design of a new or existing consumer product. Considers the function, aesthetics, cost economics 
and marketability of the product. Requires a research paper and product illustration. 

DCT 227 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Introduces the fundamental principles of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing according to the 
latest ANSI standards. Applies geometric dimensioning and tolerancing symbols along with tolerances of form, profile, orientation, run-out, and 
location. 

DCT 228 Civil I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics and DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Explores the engineering field. Presents an overview of infra- 
structure design including the study of roadways and drainage systems. Emphasizes site development and highway planning. 

DCT 229 Civil II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 228 - Civil I. Presents construction management techniques, including scheduling and contracts. Studies soil properties and 
paving methods. Examines practical construction considerations. 

DCT 230 Computer Modeling and Animation 3 Credits pap 

Prerequisites: DSN 220 - Advanced CAD. Instructs students in fundamentals of computer generalized renderings and animations using 3-D 

Studio software and its components. 

mmm 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics or advisor approval. Introduces fundamentals of CAD (Computer-Aided 
Design/Drafting). Includes overview of CAD and systems, use of software and plotter applications. Each student will complete an individual proj- 
ect by the end of the semester. 



DSN 106 Descriptive Geometry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Introduces fundamental principles in developing graphical solutions to engineering problems. 
Covers true length, piercing points on a plane, line intersections, true shapes, revolutions and developments using successive auxiliary views. 

DSN 220 Advanced CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics and DSN 1Q3 - CAD Fundamentals. Focuses on advanced CAD features including fundamentals of 
three dimensional modeling for design. Includes overview of modeling, graphic manipulation, part structuring, coordinate system and developing 
strategy of model geometry. 



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DSN 221 Statics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry/Trigonometry or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Corequisites: PHY 101 - Physics I. Studies applied 
mechanics dealing with bodies at rest. Covers units, vectors, forces, equilibrium, moments and couples, planar force systems, distributed forces, 
analysis of structures (trusses and frames) and friction. 

DSN 222 Strength of Materials 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 221 - Statics. Studies internal stresses and physical deformations caused by externally applied loads to structural members. 
Covers stress and strain, shear stress, properties of areas, shearing force and bending moment, deformation of beams, columns and combined 
stresses. Teaches various materials' physical and mechanical properties. 

DSN 225 Portfolio Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: 45 credit hours in the program or advisor approval. Focuses on the student's final portfolio and preparation for the job interview. 
Finalizes design/project work demonstrating acquired knowledge and job skills along with resumS and cover letter preparation for presentation to 
prospective employers. Every student must submit a copy of final portfolio for departmental archives. 

DSN 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degree with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. 
Requires students to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
toward an associate degree. 

DSN 281-294 Special Topics in Design Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of 
interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ECE 101 Beginnings in Child Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines basic principles of child development, developmentally appropriate practice (DAP), importance of family, licens- 
ing and elements of quality care of young children with an emphasis on health and safety and the learning environment. Entry-level course for 
early care and education teachers. 

ECE 102 Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines child care practice, reflecting on the areas of relationship and communication within the program, curriculum 
development, program management, awareness, diversity and use of community resources. Offers resources to enhance professionalism. 

ECE 103 Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Entry-level course for early care and education teachers. Examines developmentally appropriate environments and activities 
in various child care settings. Explores the varying developmental levels and cultural backgrounds of children. 

ECE 105 CDA Process 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 142 - Beginnings in Child Development, CHD 143 - Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom, CHD 144 - Reflections 
on Practice in Early Childhood or program chair approval. Prepares the student for the verification process for the Child Development Associate 
(CDA) credential. Provides opportunity for practical experience through supervised participation in early care and education settings. 

ECE 110 Infant/Toddler Growth and Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and language development of infants and toddlers from conception. 
Examines the crucial role of brain development during the first three years. 

ECE 111 Environments for Infants and Toddlers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the physical, human and time environments required for high-quality care of infants and toddlers. The parent- 
teacher partnership along with adult-adult relationships within the environment are explored. 

ECE 120 Child Growth and Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children from conception to age 12, as well as quality 
care and education of young children. 

ECE 130 Developmentally Appropriate Guidance in a Cultural Context 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a basic understanding of the anti-bias/multi-cultural emphasis in the field of early childhood. Analyzes developmen- 
tally appropriate practices, theory, and implementation for various early childhood settings. Includes lectures, field trips, review of current litera- 
ture and observations. 

ECE 186 Grandparenting/Kinship Parenting 3 Credits 

Provides an overview of the traditional grandparent role and the current role of grandparenting grandchildren. Includes a study of the foals, con- 
cerns, and issues confronted by grandparents or other kin in the parenting role. 

ECE 200 Family/Teacher Partnership 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the family/teacher partnership, recognizing the need to work successfully with the child's development. Promotes 
awareness of families as the child's first teacher and the child's basis for culture, language, attitudes and values. Provides the structure for creat- 
ing practices that establish active family participation. Explores issues and resources for families. 



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ECE 240 Introduction to Care in the Home 3 Credits 

Offers an overview of care of children offered in a home-like setting. The course includes providing safe, healthy learning environment in the 
home setting, family-provider relationships, and recommendation for developing a professional support system. 

ECE 243 Cognitive Curriculum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews cognitive theories to develop appropriate practices in activities as they relate to problem-solving skills, math, sci- 
ence and social studies in early childhood settings. Reviews multicultural education. 

ECE 245 School Age Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 122 - Child Growth and Development, CHD 142 - Beginnings in Child Development. Corequisites: CHD 211 - School Age 
Programming. Provides opportunities for practical experience through observation and supervised participation in a school-age setting. Students 
will develop and implement appropriate environments and activities. 



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ECE 201 Skills for Parenting 3 Credits 

Focuses on skill development in parents to increase their effectiveness in understanding young children, building on the child's self-esteem, com- 
municating with young children, setting appropriate boundaries, and nurturing their emotional and social development. Examines models of par- 
ent education, parenting styles, and the need for parent empowerment. 

ECE 204 Families in Transition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the stages of the family life cycle and interpersonal relationships among family members. Explores systems 
dynamics within the family, the community and larger culture. Recognizes the impact of context and culture on the family's ability to function. 

ECE 210 Early Childhood Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 144 - Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood, CHD 122 - Child Growth and Development, CHD 142 Beginnings in 
Child Development or advisor approval. Introduces principles of managing an early care and education program. Emphasizes the role of the 
manager to include personnel and program administration and fiscal management. Explores cuent-community relations. 

ECE 213 Infant/Toddler Care Programming 3 Credits 

Studies the program and operation for quality infant and toddler care and education. Examines the important role of the teacher in establishing 
positive and productive relationships with families and in managing an effective program. 

ECE 216 Curriculum Planning in the Early Childhood Classroom for Adminstrators 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program chair permission. Presents an overview of cognitive and creative curriculum from a developmentally appropriate perspec- 
tive. Examines early childhood curriculum models with an emphasis on pl annin g and evaluating curriculum to meet the comprehensive needs of 
the young child. Emphasizes staff and family involvement in curriculum planning, implementation and assessment. 

ECE 218 Leadership and Mentoring in Early Childhood Education 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: At least 20 hours of early childhood coursework. Introduces the concept of leadership. Includes theories of leadership and team- 
work and provides an opportunity for students to shadow a leader in an early childhood setting. 

ECE 223 School Age Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines environments, materials, methods and teaching styles for providing creative experiences for the school age child. 
Offers appropriate experiences in music, movement, art and drama as well as methods to assist students in identification and pursuit of specific 
personal interest areas in a school age child care setting. Reviews theories of adolescent growth and development, establishment of partnerships 
with families and positive guidance techniques for school age children. 

ECE 225 Infant Toddler Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 120 - Infant/Toddler Growth and Development. Corequisites: CHD 113 - Environments for Infants and Toddlers or CHD 213 
- Infant/Toddler Care Programming. Provides opportunity for practical experiences through observation and supervised participation in an 
infant/toddler setting. Students develop and implement appropriate activities for this age of children. 

ECE 230 The Exceptional Child 3 Credits O 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an introduction to caring for children with special needs. Includes theories and practices for producing optimal 
developmental growth while developing effective teaching techniques. Explores public policy, inclusion, early intervention and individual educa- 
tion programs (TEPs). Explores the many types of special needs and provides methods for helping with them. 

ECE 233 Emerging Literacy in Young Children 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes the development and acquisition of language in order to provide materials and activities for optimum growth. 
Students explore and evaluate literacy for young children and its role in the child's development. Students evaluate young children's literature for 
its appropriateness. Introduces audiovisual material, techniques and various types of equipment and materials used to promote literacy in young 
children. 

ECE 235 Preschool Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 142 - Beginnings in Child Development, CHD 144 - Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood. Corequisites: CHD 143 - 
Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom. Provides opportunity for practical experience through observation and supervised participation in 
early child care and education setting with children ages 3-5. Students will develop and implement developmentally appropriate environments 
and activities. 



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m 



ECE 255 Generalist Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 144 - Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood, CHD 122 - Child Growth and Development. Corequisites: CHD 143 - 
Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom. Provides opportunity for practical experience through observation and supervised participation in 
child care settings. This practicum covers experiences with ages infant through school age. 

ECE 260 Early Childhood Professional 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of 48 program credits. Surveys and further examines early childhood philosophies, theories and theorists. Encourages 
students to form their own theories for learning, discipline, family involvement and self-concept development. Identifies preferred settings and 
environments for professional practice. Guides students in the development of a professional graduation portfolio. 

ELT 120 Introduction to Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Provides the student with limited preparatory study and entry into program level content. Topics include 
laboratory skills, basic manipulative skills, interpretation of diagrams and hand soldering techniques. Emphasis is placed upon the use of 
Electronic Work Bench software to model and analyze electronic components and circuits. 

ELT 121 Circuits I 3 Credits 

Corequisites: MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry or MAT 134 - Trigonometry and ELT 120 - Introduction to Electronics. Introduces the basics of 
electricity and electronics. Covers DC circuits. Uses lab work to stress the use of test equipment. Discusses resistance, magnetism, series circuits, 
parallel circuits, Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff s Laws and circuit analysis (superposition, The veinin, etc.). 

ELT 122 Circuits II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 121 - Circuits I, MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Studies electrical principles and laws pertaining to alternating current and 
voltage. Covers AC network theorems, operator, phasors, reactances, impedances, phase relationships, power, resonance, transformers, polyphase 
and filter circuits. 

ELT 124 Digital I 3 Credits 

Corequisites: ELT 120 - Introduction to Electronics, MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra or equivalent score on the ASSET intermediate algebra test. 
Introduces digital electronics including logic gates and combinational logic circuits. Studies binary arithmetic, Boolean algebra, mapping tech- 
niques, digital encoders and decoders, multiplexers and demultiplexers and arithmetic circuits. Uses SSI and MSI digital integrated circuits. 

ELT 125 Digital II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 124 - Digital I. Offers advanced study of digital systems including memory and D/A conversion. Covers construction of speci- 
fied timing circuits, design driver/display systems, selected register design, counters and arithmetic circuits and validation of operation. Studies 
hardware and general microprocessor system organization. 

ELT 126 Solid State I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I, or MAT 134 - Trigonometry, ELT 122 - Circuits II (may be corequisite). Studies characteristics 
and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Covers signal and rectifying diodes, bipolar transistors, rectification, single and multistage 
amplifiers, AC/DC load lines, biasing techniques, equivalent circuits and power amplifiers. 

ELT 127 Industrial Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 1 26 - Solid State 1 . Presents overview of electronics in the industrial setting. Instructs students in how electronics is applied to 
industrial systems. Introduces power machines, polyphase systems, solid state controls, transducers and industrial computer systems. 

ELT 128 Introduction to Lasers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Introduces laser action, laser beam characteristics, types of lasers, safety considerations, gener- 
al laser applications, laser and optical equipment. Teaches basics of laser, laser systems and prepares beginning laser students for future courses. 

ELT 130 Fiber Optics 3 Credits 

Corequisites: ELT 122 - Circuits n. Presents overview of fiber optics. Studies uses for fiber optics, advantages, cable details, connectors, splices, 
sources, detectors and fiber optic systems. 

ELT 203 Introduction to Industrial Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 221 - Solid State A, ELT 223 - Electrical Machines. Studies basics of controls related to industrial electronics. Includes basic 
and pilot control devices such as circuit layouts, industrial schematics, reduced voltage starters and multi-speed controllers. Covers transformer 
hook-ups and circuit protection. 

ELT 206 Analog Troubleshooting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 228 - Communications Electronics. Studies techniques for logical troubleshooting of electronic circuits and simple systems 
with emphasis on systematic diagnostic methods, signal tracing and signal injection methods. Provides experience in use of test equipment and 
electronic communication skills. 

ELT 207 Digital Troubleshooting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 222 - Microprocessors. Studies techniques for logical troubleshooting of microcomputers. Includes modal testers, microcom- 
puter controlled testers, static stimulus testers, signature analysis and logic analyzers. Emphasizes system oriented troubleshooting procedures. 

ELT 212 Networking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 222 - Microprocessors. Studies types of protocol used in data communication systems. Includes an overview of networking, 
networking control and interfacing. Emphasizes protocols, packet switching systems and local area networks. 

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ELT 214 Industrial Instrumentation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 126 - Solid State I. Emphasizes precision measurement via pressure, strain, force, flow and level gauges. Covers the related 
probes, sensors, transducers, computer interfaces, computer hardware and peripherals and computer software necessary for the acquisition, sum- 
marization, analysis and presentation of data. 

ELT 215 Laser Systems and Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 122 - Circuits n, ELT 128 - Introduction to Lasers, ELT 240 - Optics. Provides an in-depth coverage of laser types and applica- 
tions. Focuses on ion, molecular, liquid, solid state and semi-conductor lasers with specific attention given to Nd:YAG, Ruby, CO 2 and gallium 
arsenide. Discusses flash lamps, power supplies (CW and pulsed) and energy transfer mechanisms for each laser type. Examines other parts of 
laser systems including electro-optic and acousto-optic modulators, Q-switching, mode locking and mechanical and bleachable dye methods. 
Includes a description of lasers in medicine, surgery, dentistry, communications, range finding, alignment tracking, welding, cutting, drilling, data 
recording and display. Stresses hands-on operation and troubleshooting of each laser type and small-scale examples of applications. 

ELT 216 Laser and Optical Measurements 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the instruments and methods available for evaluating laser light and supporting optical equipment (lenses, mirrors, 
etc.). Includes an introduction to radiometry/photometry and typical energy/power detectors. Photographic recording mediums and important opti- 
cal measuring instruments (spectrometers, spectrophotometers, monochromators and interferometers) and methods (interference and non-interfer- 
ence testing) are also discussed. Laboratory experiments stress hands-on experience with current optical measuring equipment and methods. 

ELT 219 Biomedical Electronics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital II. Offers further study of medical electronics equipment including ECG, EEG, defibrillators, heart monitors and 
other monitoring and respiratory equipment. 

ELT 220 Biomedical Electronics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 219 - Biomedical Electronics I. Studies medical support systems including x-ray equipment, respirators and analyzers, and 
their maintenance. Studies medical ultra-sound, electrosurgery units and mechanical recorders. Prepares students for licensing and certification. 

ELT 221 Solid State n 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 126 - Solid State I. Studies applications of special-purpose diodes, thyristors and unipolar transistors. Discusses frequency 
effects and responses of amplifiers. Includes discreet SCRS, UJTs, FETs, oscillators, linear regulated power supplies, switching regulators and 
power amplifiers. Introduces op-amps. 

ELT 222 Microprocessors 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 104 - Computer Fundamentals for Technology, ELT 125 - Digital n. Introduces microprocessor system organization, opera- 
tion, design, troubleshooting and programming. Investigates and analyzes a microprocessor instruction set for its operation. Includes programming 
and interfacing a microprocessor. 

ELT 223 Electrical Machines 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 1 22 - Circuits n, MAT 1 3 1 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Provides an overview of electrical machines and how they relate to 
industrial electronics. Gives industrial electronics technicians insight into electrical power generation, polyphase system, transformers, all types of 
electrical motors, power factor and power factor correction, back-up power and electrical power monitoring. 

ELT 224 Linear Integrated Circuit Application 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 221 - Solid State n. Introduces operational amplifiers (op-amps), characteristics and operations. Includes op-amp active filters, sez-*: 
amplifiers, regulators, comparators, timers, oscillators and phase-locked loops. 

ELT 225 Introduction to National Electrical Code 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the role and use of the National Electrical Code Book. Provides an overview of interpretation, calculations, and 
revisions of the code book. 

ELT 226 Computer Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 222 - Microprocessors. Studies techniques for logical troubleshooting of microcomputers. Emphasizes system-oriented trou- 
bleshooting procedures. 

ELT 227 Peripherals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 226 - Computer Troubleshooting. Studies peripherals commonly used with computers and microcomputers interfacing with 

these peripherals. Includes a study of data communications hardware and techniques. Studies the design of circuits to interface microprocessors 

with industrial equipment. Includes microcomputer systems interfacing with input and output transducers for control systems. Studies techniques car 

for logical troubleshooting of microcomputer systems. 

ELT 228 Communications Electronics 3 Credits 

Corequisites: ELT 221 - Solid State II. Analyzes communication circuits with emphasis on AM, FM, SSB, and stereo transmitter and receiver sys- 
tems. Includes noise modulation and demodulation principles, phase-locked loop, RF amplifiers, automatic gain control, detectors, limiters and 
discriminators. Offers hands-on lab exposure to analog circuits utilizing analysis and troubleshooting techniques. 

ELT 229 Telecommunications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital n, ELT 126 - Solid State I. Examines various methods in transmitting digital data from one location to another. 
Covers time and frequency division multiplexing. Includes puke-code and delta modulation, telemetry, error detection and correction and simple 
networks. Covers techniques for logical troubleshooting of telephonic systems. 

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ELT 230 Advanced Communications Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 228 - Communications Electronics. Introduces antenna principles and wave propagation and an in-depth study of matching 
techniques for transmission lines. Includes the Smith Chart and a thorough study of television operation. Measures radiation patterns with differ- 
ent antenna arrays. Practices digital and analog troubleshooting techniques. 

ELT 231 Microwave Communications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 230 - Advanced Communications Electronics. Studies microwave transmission lines, waveguides, waveguide components 
including hybrid couplers, attenuators, microwave filters, phase shifters, T-junctions, irises and microwave tubes. 

ELT 233 Industrial Motors and Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 122 - Circuits II, AMT 201 - Manufacturing Systems Control (PLCs). Provides a complete understanding of basic ladder and 
wiring diagrams used in the control of electric motors. Includes the various electrical components and their functions as applied to motor controls. 
Topics include the various types of motors used in applying electro-mechanical power, ranging from small AC shaded-pole fan motors through 
larger three phase motors. Motor starting components, protective devices, heat dissipation, motor slippage and frequency and multi-speed motors 
are discussed. Lab assignments allow the student a hands-on approach to wiring various control components in the operation of three-phase motors. 

ELT 234 Advanced Problem Solving 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital n. Corequisites: ELT 221 - Solid State n, ELT 224 - Linear Integrated Circuit Applications. Introduces logical 
troubleshooting of electronic circuits and systems with emphasis on systematic diagnostic methods and technical reference research. Provides fur- 
ther experience in the use of test equipment and proper repair techniques. Includes job preparedness skills and preparation for appropriate certifi- 
cation testing. 

ELT 235 Process Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 224 - Linear Integrated Circuit Applications. Covers theory and applications of process control including the principles of 
PID, feedback, open loop and closed loop systems and typical process control applications. 

ELT 237 Calibrations 3 Credits 

Corequisites or Prerequisites: ELT 122 - Circuits n. Provides training in dismantling and calibration of instruments (electronic and pneumatic) 

found in industry, including DP cells, pH and oxygen analyzers, valve positioners, thermocouple circuits and controllers and control valves. 

ELT 238 Process Instrumentation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital n, ELT 221 - Solid State n. Presents the concepts and fundamentals of measurement instrumentation and its 
application to industrial process control. 

ELT 239 Troubleshooting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital n, ELT 221 - Solid State n, ELT 233 - Industrial Motors and Controls, and approval of program chair. Introduces 
techniques of logical troubleshooting of electronic circuits and systems with emphasis on systematic diagnostic methods, signal tracing and signal 
injection methods. Provides further experience in the use of test equipment and proper repair techniques. Class sessions will consist of lecture, 
discussion and problem recitation. Problem-solving and laboratory assignments will reinforce concepts in the reading and lecture experience. 

ELT 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the- 
job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

ELT 281-294 Special Topics in Electronics Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of inter- 
est that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ENG 001 Elementary English as a Second Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to write and understand simple statements and questions on familiar topics. The suggested range on the 
English Placement Test is 16-35. Emphasizes writing elementary statements, reading and understanding elementary materials and expanding com- 
petence in speaking and listening. 

ENG 002 Intermediate English as a Second Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated intermediate competency in English with ability to read, write, and speak with control of basic language structures. 
The suggested range on the English Placement Test is 36-54. Emphasizes writing, reading and speaking with increasing competence in academic 
and social situations. 

ENG 003 Pre-Academic English as a Second Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated fair control of most sentence structure, expository materials, statement and conversation in social and academic set- 
tings. The suggested range on the English Placement Test is 55-65. Emphasizes paragraph organization, reading and understanding expository and 
academic materials through vocabulary development. Develops comprehension of social and academic conversations and lectures. 

ENG 004 Academic English as a Second Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to write with some ease, understand expository academic reading material, understand lectures and converse 
in academic and social situations. The suggested range on the English Placement Test is 66-84. Emphasizes organization of expository writing, 
finding main ideas and details in academic texts and understanding and speaking in academic settings. 



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ENG 007 Spelling 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Improves basic spelling competencies through practice and attention to spelling rules and exceptions. 



^.„ .> t 



ENG 010 English As A Second Language - Reading I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollment Appraisal. Develops basic reading skills in English using texts on subjects relating to American cul- 
ture. Emphasizes vocabulary acquisition, dictionary use, reading strategies for basic comprehension and interpretation. Uses collaborative tech- 
nique of student interaction. 

ENG Oil English As A Second Language - Reading II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Reading Mastery. Stresses comprehension skills using texts which focus on American cultural values. Focuses on 
vocabulary expansion, comprehension and interpretation strategies, and experience with various forms of reading material. 

ENG 012 English As A Second Language - Reading HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 011 - English As A Second Language - Reading n. Stresses comprehension skills and reading strategies for academic materi- 
als. Focuses on vocabulary expansion, transitional development, theme development and critical analysis of academic writing. Allows for practice 
in increased reading proficiency. 

ENG 013 English As a Second Language - Listening/Speaking I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-Enrollment Appraisal. Focuses on listening and speaking strategies for comprehensible input. Provides practice 
recognizing and producing speech patterns of American English. Allows for conversational practice on topics of cultural values and behaviors. 

ENG 014 English As A Second Language - Listening/Speaking II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Listening/Speaking Mastery. Provides practice in recognizing and producing speech patterns of American English. 
Allows for conversational practice with emphasis on cross-cultural values and behaviors and the use of idioms. 

ENG 015 English As A Second Language - Listening/Speaking in 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 014 - English As A Second Language - Listening/Speaking n. Provides experience in recognizing and producing speech pat- 
terns of American English Allows for conversational practice relating to academic and cultural subjects with an emphasis on critical thinking 
skills expressed verbally. 

ENG 016 English As A Second Language - Grammar/Structure I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollment Appraisal. Focuses on the acquisition of basic patterns of structure and syntax for controlled commu- _ — , 
nication. Emphasis is on the form, meaning and usage of basic structures in American English, providing practice through extensive and varied 
communicative activities. 

ENG 017 English As A Second Language - Grammar/Structure II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Grammar/Structure Mastery. Focuses on the study of patterns of more advanced structure and syntax. Emphasis is on 
the acquisition of sentence structure for verbal and written communication of the relationship of ideas. 

ENG 018 English As A Second Language - Grammar/Structure III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 017 - English As A Second Language - Grammar/Structure n. Focuses on the acquisition of more advanced patterns of struc- 
ture and syntax. Emphasis is on the development of competent verbal and written expression in critical analysis for academic purposes. 

ENG 019 English As A Second Language - Writing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollment Appraisal. Focuses on conventions for basic written communication in English emphasizing sentence 

construction and paragraph development. Uses writing strategies to produce coherent expression in journals, free writing exercises, paragraphing 

and short essays. Student collaboration is a part of the learned writing process. ®aai 

ENG 020 English As A Second Language - Writing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level ESL Writing Mastery. Focuses on techniques of written communication for coherent expression of ideas through paragraph 
development and essay writing. Emphasizes the writing process using strategies of revision and editing through peer collaboration. Stresses the 
structure and syntax of written expression for effective communication. 

!■* 

ENG 021 English As A Second Language - Writing HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 020 - English As A Second Language - Writing II. Focuses on techniques of written communication for the analysis and elab- 
oration of academic material through paragraph and essay writing. Emphasizes the strategies of the writing process through rhetorical modes of 
composition for varied purposes. Extensive use of structure and syntax for thoroughly coherent expression. 



3 



ENG 024 Introduction to College Writing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51). Enables the beginning college writer 
to develop control of the writing process through writings which are focused, organized and well developed. Requires students to demonstrate 
proficiency in basic standard writing conventions including grammar and mechanics. 

ENG 025 Introduction to CoUege Writing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I or demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment 
(ASSET 38-40, COMPASS 52-69). Builds on the competencies learned in ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I and prepares students for 
entry into English 111 - English Composition. Enables beginning college writers to expand control of the writing process through writings which 
are focused, organized and well developed. Requires students to demonstrate increased proficiency in the use of standard writing conventions. 

189 



ENG 028 Vocabulary Building 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on developing general English vocabulary. Includes dictionary skills, context skill and work structure analysis. 

ENG 031 Reading Strategies for College I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Increases performance in reading 
comprehension, vocabulary and flexibility. Introduces critical reading skills and study strategies. 

ENG 032 Reading Strategies for College II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 031 - Reading Strategies for College I or demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment 
(ASSET 37-39, COMPASS 66-79). Enhances performance in reading flexibility, vocabulary and comprehension beyond the level of ENG 031 - 
Reading Strategies for College I. Emphasizes critical reading and strategies for effective study. 

ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with an overview of pollution problems involving water, air, solid waste, radiation population, and noise. 
Discusses current national and international problems and concerns. 

ENV 102 Environmental Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the political process of environmental law. 

ENV 103 Environmental Chemistry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Provides hands-on laboratory training in the application of EPA and state-required permit param- 
eters to determine facility compliance. Reviews sampling techniques and preservation methods and basic statistical quality control analysis. 

ENV 104 Plant Operations — Sanitary 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides the basic principles of aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment processes including activated sludge, 
trickling filters, lagoons, sludge handling and disinfection. Reviews state and federal regulations related to wastewater plants. 

ENV 105 Air Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on understanding air pollution sources, effects and treatment technologies. 

ENV 106 Water 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENV 103 - Environmental Chemistry. Introduces the basic treatment processes of water supplies including coagulation, sedimenta- 
tion, filtration, chemical dosage, taste and odor control. 

ENV 107 Applied Research I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Requires completion of a special project or case study specifically related to the occupational area. Serves as a 
field project within the framework of actual working experience in business or industry or a research case study including data collection and 
data analysis. 

ENV 204 Basic Fluid Mechanics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the principles of flow measurement, metering in closed conduits, open channels, streams, storm run-off, pump 
characteristics and air flow. 

ENV 208 Plant Operations — Industrial 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Covers wastewater treatment processes including coagulation, sedimentation, activated sludge, neutralization, 
equalization and cyanide and chromate removal. Presents instrumentation, maintenance and troubleshooting. Includes operations, laboratory test- 
ing and associated mathematics. 

ENV 214 Environmental Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Surveys the major current environmental regulations. 

ENV 215 Waste Disposal 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENV 212 - Solids Handling and Disposal. Provides students with a basic understanding of solid and hazardous waste disposal 
problems. 

ENV 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Provides students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. 
Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

HAH 110 Art Appreciation 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 031, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. An 
introductory course in art which explores the creative processes of humankind, its usage of specific traditional and contemporary media for com- 
munication and the study of periods and styles in art as they relate to the human condition. Students must complete work based on observation 
and/or research for oral or written presentation or seminar participation as assigned by the instructor. 3 class hours. 

HAH 130 Art History I-Pre-history to 1500 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HAH 110 or 199, and successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate 
placement test scores. HAH 1 10 or 199 is not required for students whose recentered SAT Verbal score is (R)420 or greater. Surveys painting, 
sculpture, and architectural styles from ancient cultures to the pre-Renaissance era. Emphasizes the historical context of art movements as well 
as analysis of the work of individual artists. Provides a foundation for the study of art history. 3 class hours. 



190 



HAH 131 Art History 11-1500 to 20th Century 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: HAH 110 or 199, and successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate place- 
ment testing scores. HAH 110 or 199 is not required for students whose re-centered SAT Verbal score is (R)420 or greater. Surveys painting, 
sculpture, and architectural styles from the Renaissance to the 20th Century. Emphasizes the historical context of art movements as well as 
analysis of the work of individual artists. Focuses on developing analytical skills. 3 class hours. 

HEA 101 Heating Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces fundamentals applicable to the heating phase of air conditioning. Includes types of units, parts, basic controls, 
functions and applications. Emphasizes practices, tools and meter uses, temperature measurement, heat flow, heat measurement, introduction to 
psychnometrics and heat loss/gain. 

HEA 103 Refrigeration I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces refrigerant compression systems used in mechanical refrigeration, including the refrigeration cycle. Introduces 
safety procedures and proper uses of tools used to install and service refrigeration equipment. 

HEA 104 Heating Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 101 - Heating Fundamentals and TEC 113 - Basic Electricity. Covers procedures used to analyze mechanical and electrical 
problems encountered when servicing heating systems including gas, oil, electric and hydronic heating equipment. Considers electrical schematic 
and diagrams, combustion testing, venting and combustion air requirements, installation and service procedures. 

HEA 106 Refrigeration U 3 Credits f^J 

Prerequisites: HEA 103 - Refrigeration I and TEC 113 - Basic Electricity. Continues Refrigeration I with further study of compressors, metering 
devices and an introduction to troubleshooting procedures. Includes clean-up procedures following compressor burn-out and analysis of how a 
single problem affects the rest of the system. 

HEA 107 Duct Fabrication and Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Emphasizes reading blueprints common to the sheet metal trade, floor plans, elevations, section, detail and 

mechanical plans. Requires students to develop a layout of an air conditioning system, layout of duct work and fittings and fabrication of these 

parts, including proper use of hand-tools, and shop equipment used to fabricate duct work and fittings. - s 

HEA 201 Cooling Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 1 13 - Basic Electricity and HEA 103 - Refrigeration I. Covers procedures used to diagnose electrical control problems found 
in residential air conditioning and refrigeration systems including 24-volt and line voltage controls such as defrost timers, defrost heaters, relays 
and cold controls with emphasis on schematic and pictorial diagrams. 

HEA 202 Electrical Circuits and Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 101 - Heating Fundamentals, HEA 103 - Refrigeration I, and TEC 113 - Basic Electricity. Studies various kinds of heating, 
air conditioning and refrigeration controls. Includes gas, oil, cooling and electric heat controls, thermostats and other kinds of variable controls 
such as humidistats, aquastats and electronic thermostats and temperature controls. Covers operation of controls and how they are integrated into 
complex systems by using schematic and pictorial diagrams. Presents component troubleshooting and testing. 

HEA 204 Commercial Refrigeration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 106 - Refrigeration n. Examines air conditioning and refrigeration systems for commercial use, including medium- and low 
temperature applications. Includes refrigeration accessories, metering devices and advance control arrangements. % 

HEA 206 Advanced Cooling Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 201 - Cooling Service. Considers methods of troubleshooting electrical and mechanical components of air conditioning and 
refrigeration systems. 

HEA 214 Applied Design 3 Credits P»#s 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides students with the opportunity to design and lay out a complete HVAC system. 

HEA 220 Distribution Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Covers methods used in calculating building envelope heat loss and gain in sizing units for residential and light 
commercial applications. Studies the relationship of air properties to temperature and the design of systems for residential and light commercial »««; 

structures. Includes the sizing and configurations of air delivery duct systems. 

HEA 221 Heat Pumps and Cooling Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 106 - Refrigeration II. Covers procedures used to diagnose electrical control problems found in residential air-to-air, geother- ■■* 

mal heat pump and cooling systems including 24-volt and line voltage controls. Familiarizes students with the refrigeration cycle as it applies to 
the heat pump. Covers correct charging procedures and sizing of heat pumps. Includes trouble shooting of heat pumps and cooling systems such s ^.<; 

as defrost timers, defrost heaters, relays and cold controls with emphasis on schematic and pictorial diagrams. 

HEG 249 Elements of General Linguistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of READ 011, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A 
study of basic linguistic concepts and an introduction to historical, comparative, descriptive, and applied linguistics. 3 class hours. 

HEG 250 English Grammar 3 Credits 

A study of the grammars of American English. A course designed to acquaint students with the modern descriptions of the structures of lan- 
guage. 3 class hours. 

191 



HEH 110 Introduction to Humanities I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R) 420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A 
general education course designed to acquaint students with the broad and interrelated disciplines with the humanities. The content includes 
painting, sculpture, architecture, and drama. 3 class hours. 

HEH 111 Introduction to Humanities II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R) 420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. HEH 
110 is not a prerequisite for HEH 111. A general education course designed to acquaint students with the broad and interrelated disciplines within 
humanities. The content includes dance, literature, music, and film. 3 class hours. 

HEL 220 Introduction to World Literature I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores, and 
successful completion of HEW 101 or HEW 112. A general education survey course designed to acquaint the student with the literary master- 
pieces and various literary types produced from Homer's time to Shakespeare's. The course includes a study of drama, poetry (with some atten- 
tion to epic form as well as shorter narrative verse), and the philosophic essay. Combines practice in advanced expository writing with literary 
study. 3 class hours. 

HEL 221 Introduction to World Literature II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of any one of the following: HEW 101, HEW 112, or HEL 220. A general education survey course 
designed to acquaint the student with selected major literary works and various literary types produced from the Jacobean period to the present. 
The course content includes work by the Eastern, Continental, British, and American authors. Instruction in research techniques and writing 
research papers is combined with literary study. To meet the requirements of a second writing course, students must complete HEL 220 and HEL 
221 with at least a C average. 3 class hours. 

HEL 222 American Literature I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A 
study of major American poets and prose writers, noting their relationship to contemporary English writers. The course emphasizes the early 
colonial, national, and sectional periods of literature. 3 class hours. 

HEL 223 American Literature II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A 
study of the poets and prose writers of the so-called Second National Period of American Literature. The course also includes some of the pres- 
ent-day writers of poetry, prose, and drama. 3 class hours. 

HEL 224 Survey of English Literature I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A 
study of major British poets and prose writers, beginning with Beowulf and ending with the eighteenth century. Emphasis will be given to the 
developing of genres of the period. 3 class hours. 

HEL 225 Survey of English Literature II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A 
study of British poets and prose writers emphasizing the Romantic, Victorian, and modern periods. 3 class hours. 

HEL 227 Introduction to World Fiction 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A 
general education course designed to acquaint students with the fiction genre. The course examines fiction of various types and periods by 
Continental, Eastern, American and British authors. 3 class hours. 

HEL 232 The Literary Image of Woman: Colony to Modern State 3 Credits 

This course will present a survey of the image of woman as demonstrated in American letters and modern film from 1620 to the present. The 
course will thus deal with both stereotyped and admiring portraits, and in doing so will, as literary survey must, demonstrate the link between lit- 
erary production and the changing cultural milieu as it relates to women in America. 3 lecture/discussion hours. 

HEL 240 Children's Literature 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. This 
course is designed both for education majors who need to meet state requirements and for students who may wish to gain or regain appreciation 
for the best literature written for children. Classic and modern children's books, ranging from kindergarten to junior high level, will be read and 
discussed. 3 class hours. 

HEW 009 Fundamentals of Writing 3 Credits 

This course is designed for students deficient in English fundamentals. Course work centers on writing sentences and paragraphs. Instruction is 
given in the elements of grammar, syntax, punctuation, and spelling. For students with a recentered SAT verbal score of (R)360 or below or 
equivalent scores on the ACT and placement examination. 3 class hours. 

HEW 011 Writing Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of HEW 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. 
This course is designed to help students who have completed HEW 009 but who are not yet ready for HEW 101 English Composition I. HEW 
011 is a review of writing and editing skills to prepare students for college writing and writing in the workplace. Students should have basic 
understanding of simple sentence structure; more advanced structure will be covered in class. Students will write paragraphs and short essays. 
Students will regularly complete assignments that relate reading and writing. 3 class hours. 



192 



HEW 101 English Composition I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites : Successful completion of ENG 03 1 and HEW 009 (or HEW 1 1 ), or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)3 70 or greater, or appropri- 
ate placement test scores. HEW 009 or 01 1 must be completed with a grade of C or better. English Composition I is a college level course in 
writing designed to help students develop their ability to think, to organize, and to express their ideas clearly and effectively. Emphasis is placed 
on the various forms of expository writing such as process, description, narration, comparison, analysis, persuasion, and argumentation. Numerous 
in-class writing assignments are required in addition to extended essays written outside of class. Required of all students. 3 class hours. 

HEW 102 English Composition H 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in HEW 1 1 and successful completion of ENG 032 or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R) 420 or greater 
or appropriate placement test scores. A continued development of writing skills introduced in HEW 101. Students leam how to conduct 
research and how to base their writing on research. In addition to shorter documented papers, all students are required to write a longer investiga- 
tive paper that must be fully documented according to MLA standards. 3 class hours. 

HEW 108 Technical Writing 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in HEW 101. A course designed to provide students of technology with the communication skills that 
enable them to compose effective, precise, concise, technical reports. 3 class hours. 

HEW 112 Rhetoric and Research 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Recentered SAT verbal score of (R)530 or above (23 or above on the ACT) or appropriate placement test scores. Rhetoric and 
Research is an advanced course in composition that combines rhetorical principles with research writing strategies. Students leam how to incor- 
porate outside sources into their writing and how to employ critical thinkin g skills to help them evaluate the validity of the sources that they use. 
A sequence of seven papers is required (a minimum of 7000 words). Writing assignments will vary and increase in complexity from a short, 
one-page summary to one long, ten to twelve page research paper. Except for in-class writing, all papers must be fully documented according to 
MLA standards. Students who receive at least a C in the class will not be required to take a second semester of composition. 3 class hours. 

HEW 202 Creative Writing 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in HEW 101. A course designed to give students the opportunity for creative expression through one or 
more of the literary genres - short fiction, novella, poetry, one-act drama, and essay. 3 class hours. 

HEW 210 Advanced Expository Writing 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in HEW 101. Advanced Expository Writing is designed to prepare students for the type of writing expected 
in upper level courses in the major. All writing in the course is based on sources, and students are shown how to incorporate outside material 
into their own writing. Documentation and the proper use of evidence in research will be emphasized. (Recommended for students transferring 
to Indiana University.) 3 class hours. 

HHS 101 Medical Terminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses basic terminology required of the allied health professional. Presents Greek and Latin prefixes, as well as suffix- 
es, word roots and combining forms. Emphasizes fo rmin g a solid foundation for a medical vocabulary including meaning, spelling, and pronun- 
ciation. Includes medical abbreviations, signs and symbols. 

HHS 102 Medical Law and Ethics 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in reading through appropriate assessment or successful completion of BSA reading coursework. 
Presents ethics of medicine and medical practice as well as legal requirements and implications for allied health professions. 

■BE 

HHS 103 Dosage Calculation 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competencies in mathematics and reading or ENG 031 - Reading Strategies for College I and MAT 044 - 
Mathematics. Introduces the mathematical concepts required of the allied health professional to accurately administer medications. 

HHS 104 CPR and Basic Health Awareness 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information necessary to recognize the need for one- and two-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation 
(CPR) as it relates to adults, children and infants. Requires students to safely perform CPR. 

HHS 106 Holistic Concepts and Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I, and ENG 031 - Reading Strategies for College I or 
through appropriate assessment. Introduces the student to the holistic approach in the art and science of healthful living. The course content 
emphasizes the interrelatedness of the total person — body, mind and spirit — in achieving the goals of therapeutic, rehabilitative and maintenance 
roles. The student will identify and model methods of personal holistic wellness in society. 



HHS 281-294 Special Topics in Health and Human Services 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on 
topics of interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program areas. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

HLF 101 French Level I 4 Credits 

An introduction to the French language and culture with emphasis on oral skills. Guided communication tasks, vocabulary building, listening 
comprehension, phonetics. Use of videos, audio-visual aids, and "less-stress" techniques. Introduction to reading and writing. 4 class hours. 

HLF 103 French Level H 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: HLF 101 or appropriate placement test score. A continuation of HLF 101 with structured oral communication, vocabulary build- 
ing. Reading of graded and glossed materials, basic grammatical structures, writing. 4 class hours. 

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CA 



HLF 201 French Level 111 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: HLF 103 or appropriate placement test score Emphasis on reading. Conversation coordinated with reading of cultural text. 4 class 
hours. 

HLF 203 French Level IV 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: HLF 201 or permission of instructor. A continuation of HLF 201 with emphasis on writing. Readings on cultural and contempo- 
rary topics. 4 class hours. 

HLS 100 Basic Conversational Spanish 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. An introduction to basic vocabulary, structures, and cultural information needed for communicating while traveling in 
Spanish-speaking countries and Spanish-speaking regions of the United States. 

HLS 101 Spanish Level I 4 Credits 

An introduction to the Soanish language and culture with emphasis on listening comprehension. Guided communications tasks, vocabulary build- 
ing. Use of audio-visual aids, videos, language lab, and "less stress" techniques. 

HLS 103 Spanish Level II 4 Credits 

A continuation of HLS 101 with structured oral communication, vocabulary building. Emphasis on speaking. Introduction to reading of graded 
and glossed materials, basic grammatical structures, writing. 

HLS 201 Spanish Level HI 4 Credits 

Emphasis on reading. Conversation coordinated with reading of cultural text, written, and oral reports. Continued study of grammar structures, 
vocabulary building. 

HLS 203 Spanish Level IV 4 Credits 

A continuation of HLS 201 with emphasis on writing. Cultural and contemporary topics. 

HLT 125 Health Care Systems and Trends 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the health care industry emphasizing the systems approach to health care and the current trends facing the industry. 
Gives special attention to managed care organizations. 

HLT 225 Finance and Budgeting for Health Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Importance is placed on the development and use of departmental budgets. Financial state- 
ments will be used to project future expenses and revenues for an organization and/or department. Emphasizes the reimbursement process for a 
managed care environment and purchasing procedures. 

HLT 226 Organizational Development in Health Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUS 105 - Principles of Management. Examines organizational structure in health care organizations including traditional structures 
and re-engineering of the health care industry. Covers staff development, training, job analysis and design and departmental staffing. Discusses 
medical ethics. 

HMS 101 Introduction to Human Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores the history of human services, career opportunities and the role of the human service worker. Focuses on target pop- 
ulations and community agencies designed to meet the needs of various populations. 

HMS 102 Helping Relationship Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides opportunities to increase effectiveness in helping people. Examines the helping process in terms of skills, helping 
stages and issues involved in a helping relationship. Introduces major theories of helping. 

HMS 103 Interviewing and Assessment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, or permission of the program chair. 
Develops skills in interviewing and provides a base for students to build personal styles. Introduces a variety of assessment approaches and treat- 
ment planning. 

HMS 104 Crisis Intervention 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides beginning training for people who anticipate or are presently working in crisis situations. 

HMS 105 Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the study of crime and criminals and how society is affected. 

HMS 106 Physiology of Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the physical changes and common pathologies associated with the aging process. Includes the psychological and 
social implications of changes for human behavior. Focuses on health promotion and disease prevention. 

HMS 107 Human Services Topical Seminar 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Approval of program chair. Discusses topics of current interest in human services. Focuses on special interest projects for students 
in human services. Utilizes field trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars. 



194 



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HMS 108 Psychology of Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the major behavioral changes in adulthood and aging. Students explore their own feelings about aging as well as the 
attitudes of society. 

HMS 109 Understanding Diversity 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Encourages multicultural awareness an appreciation of various forms of diversity in the population. Focuses on the major 
cultural and ethics population in the United States as well as the social and political issues affecting these groups. Students are encouraged to 
compare their cultural assumptions with those of people from groups in order to enhance their awareness of multiple points of view. 

HMS 110 Women's Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Major issues and social problems related to women through an interdisciplinary analysis of social institutions and move- 
ments for social change as they affect women. Focus is on 20th century trends in such institutions as the family, law, medicine, education and 
other social interaction. 

HMS 112 Recreation for Special Populations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the nature and etiology of impairments including developmental disabilities, mental illness, physical disabilities and 
geriatrics and their potential impact upon an individual's ability to participate in recreational activities. Explores techniques needed to conduct a 
recreation program which allows successful participation by an individual with a disability. «! 

HMS 113 Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides basic information about alcohol and drugs and the laws which pertain to their abuse. Explores current attitudes and 
practices which pertain to alcohol and drug use, misuse and dependence. Class can be used toward ICAADA certification. 

HMS 114 Social Services in Long-Term Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides practical and useful information about aging and institutionalization. Focuses on the role of social services within 
the long-term care facility. Indiana State Department of Health State Certification requires 48 hours of attendance. 

HMS 116 Introduction of Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides the participant with background knowledge of the field of mental retardation/developmental disabilities and issues 
pertinent to the field. 

HMS 120 Health and Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the physical changes and common pathologies associated with the aging process. Focuses on the 
psychological and social implications of such changes for human behavior. Throughout the course there is a focus on health promotion and dis- 
ease prevention during the later years. 

HMS 122 Introduction to Residential Treatment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces information, skills and attitudes necessary to become an effective worker in residential treatment. Explores basic 
developmental needs, planning and use of activities and issues related to the team approach. Discusses and demonstrates observation and record- 
ing of behavior. 

HMS 124 Activity Director Basic 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores the philosophy and investigates the development of therapeutic activity programs for older persons. Focuses on 

activities which will meet the individual's physical, social and emotional needs. ___ 

HMS 130 Social Aspects of Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers major theories and patterns of aging in American society. Covers social institutions and cultural factors that affect the " "" 
aging process. 

HMS 140 Loss and Grief 3 Credits i 

Prerequisites: None. Provides practical and useful information for everyone who has experienced a loss. Addresses the problems of loss and grief 
and how to develop coping skills. Students will evaluate their own experiences and attitudes toward loss and grief. 

HMS 201 Internship I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, and HMS 103 - Interviewing and , Xk 

Assessment, or program advisor approval. Corequisites: HMS 203 - Internship Seminar I. A field work experience in an approved social, educa- 
tional, law enforcement, corrections or other community service organization. The student will be supervised by an internship site professional 
and a college faculty member. A minimum of 180 hours of work experience is required. 



HMS 202 Internship H 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 201 - Internship I, HMS 203 - Internship Seminar I, HMS 205 - Behavioral/Reality Techniques, HMS 206 - Group Process 
and Skills or program advisor approval. Corequisites: HMS 204 - Internship Seminar n. Continues Internship I. A minimum of 180 hours of 
work experience is required. 

HMS 203 Internship Seminar I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and 
Assessment, or program advisor approval. Corequisites: HMS 201 - Internship I. Permits small group discussion and analysis of the human serv- 
ices internship experience. Includes special learning objectives related to the kind of work the student does after completing the program. 



195 



HMS 204 Internship Seminar II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and 
Assessment, HMS 201 - Internship I, HMS 203 - Internship Seminar I or program advisor approval. Corequisites: HMS 202 - Internship n. 
Continues Internship Seminar I with different learning objectives. Relates objectives to the work the student does after completing the program. 

HMS 205 Behavioral/Reality Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and 
Assessment. Focuses on theories of behavioral and reality approaches. Develops understanding of terms and practical applications of the behav- 
ioral and reality approaches used in working with people. 

HMS 206 Group Process and Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationship Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and 
Assessment, or permission by program chairperson. Studies group dynamics, issues, and behavior. Includes group functioning and leadership, 
guidelines on working effectively with a co-leader, and practical ways of evaluating the group process. 

HMS 207 Program Planning/Policy Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationship Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and 
Assessment, or program advisor approval. Concentrates on the components of administration of human service agencies. Addresses practitioner 
skills needed by an administrator or supervisor. Discusses social policy issues and their impact on human services. 

HMS 208 Treatment Models of Substance Abuse 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 1 1 3 - Problems of Substance Abuse in Society or program advisor approval. Describes the various treatment models used 
with chemically dependent clients. Discussion centers on intervention and treatment models for chemical dependency and their role in the recov- 
ery process. Course can be applied toward hours for ICAADA certification. 

HMS 209 Counseling Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 1 1 3 - Problems of Substance Abuse in Society or program advisor approval. Explores practice strategies for the worker who 
counsels chemically dependent clients. Course can be applied toward hours for ICAADA certification. 

HMS 210 Co-Dependency 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 113 - Problems of Substance Abuse in Society or program advisor approval. Presents the definitions of codependency and the 
issues related to it. Students leam skills and techniques to confront codependent behavior. Course can be applied toward hours for ICAADA cer- 
tification. 

HMS 215 Juvenile Delinquency 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the concepts, definitions and measurements of juvenile delinquency. Explores various theories 
which attempt to explain the causes of delinquency. Looks at the role of environmental influences (peers, gangs, school, drugs, etc.) as they con- 
tribute to delinquency. Discusses an overview of the history and philosophy of the juvenile justice system as well as ways to control and treat 
juvenile delinquents. 

HMS 220 Issues and Ethics in Human Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationship Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and 
Assessment. Provides an introductory overview of the legal and ethical aspects in the field of human services with implications for the human 
services worker. Included are such topics as liability, confidentiality and privilege, records and tights of clients, due process and equal protection 
in terms of staff and client, discrimination and witnessing. 

HMS 240 Rehabilitation Process: Probation and Parole 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 105 - Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation Services or program advisor approval. Provides an understanding of proba- 
tion and parole as an integral part of the criminal justice system with special emphasis on current and future trends in this area. Explores the role 
of community corrections and its impact on the role of probation and parole in our society in view of the increase in the number of offenders. 

HMS 281-294 Special Topics in Human Services 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationship Techniques, and HMS 103 - Interviewing and 
Assessment. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest that 
reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

HMT 100 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a study of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) regulations which protect workers 
from exposure to occupational hazards. Concentrates on researching, interpreting, summarizing and applying the OSHA regulations for workers 
who handle hazardous materials. 

HMT 104 Hazardous Materials Health Effects 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews research conducted to determine the systematic health effects of exposures to chemicals. Includes determination of 
risk factors, routes of entry of hazardous materials, and their effects on target organs, acute, and chronic effects and control measures. 

HMT 200 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMT 100 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulations. Provides a detailed study of the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations pertaining to hazardous waste management with an emphasis on the requirements of the 
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation Liability Act (CERCLA) and the 
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). 

196 



HMT 201 Contingency Planning 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches students to develop an emergency response contingency plan for a facility or community. Includes analyzing the 
hazards, writing and implementing the contingency plans, training employees for an emergency and evaluating the effectiveness of the contin- 
gency plan. 

HMT 203 Sampling Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMT 100 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration, HMT 120 - Hazard Communication Standard, and HMT 200 
Environmental Protection Agency Regulations. Introduces students to a variety of sampling procedures used in industrial settings and for emer- 
gency response. Includes sampling and monitoring devices, industrial hygiene monitoring, water and waste stream monitoring, outside air sam- 
pling, soil sampling and radiation. Emphasizes collecting and preserving representative samples, interpreting laboratory results and complying 
with relevant federal regulations. 

HMT 205 Department of Transportation (DOT) Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMT 100 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Provides a detailed study of the U.S. Department of Transportation 
(DOT) regulations. Introduces certain Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency regulations pertinent to hazardous 
materials transportation. Includes problems and case studies in which students identify and interpret applicable DOT regulations and recommend 
compliance strategies. Provides practical understanding of DOT issues through interviews with local professionals in hazardous materials han- 
dling. 

HMT 220 Hazardous Materials Recovery, Incineration and Disposal 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SCM 111 - Chemistry I. Explains methods of recovery, incineration and/or disposal of hazardous waste. Includes contracting with 
qualified disposal organizations, obtaining permits and ensuring regulatory compliance of hazardous waste. 

HOS 101 Sanitation and First Aid 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Helps students learn basic principles of sanitation and safety in order to maintain a safe and healthy food service environ- 
ment. Presents the laws and regulations related to safety, fire and sanitation and how to adhere to them in the food service operation. 

HOS 102 Basic Foods Theory and Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Students learn the fundamentals of food preparation, service procedures, and sanitation and safety practices in the food serv- smsm 

ice business. They will use proper operation techniques for equipment. This course also provides a background and history of the hospitality 
industry and introduces the student to the broad spectrum of hospitality/food service organizations and career opportunities. Students will be 
familiarized with the organizational structure and basic functions of departments. 

3 

HOS 103 Soups, Stocks and Sauces 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Concentrates on the four major stocks and the soups that are derived from them. Time will be given to help develop the nec- 
essary skills to prepare food using any one of the 14 major cooking methods. 

HOS 104 Nutrition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the characteristics, functions and food sources of the major nutrient groups and how to maximize nutrient reten- 
tion in food preparation and storage. Students will be made aware of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle and to apply those principles to 

menu planning and food preparation. 

meg 

HOS 105 Introduction to Baking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents fundamentals of baking science, terminology, ingredients, weights and measures, yeast goods, pies, cakes, cookies mm , 

and quick breads and use and care of equipment. Emphasizes sanitation, hygienic work habits and conformity with health regulations. 

HOS 106 Pantry and Breakfast 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 103 - Soups, Stocks and Sauces. Covers the techniques and skills needed in breakfast cookery, as well as insight into the 

pantry department. Various methods of preparation of eggs, pancakes, waffles and cereals will be discussed. Students will receive instruction in 

salad preparation, salad dressings, hot and cold sandwich preparation, garnishes and appetizers. #"#■* 

HOS 107 Hospitality Computer Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the information needs of lodging properties and food service establishments and addresses essential 
aspects of computer systems and computer based property management systems for both front office and back functions. Focuses on computer- 
based restaurant management systems for both service-oriented and management-oriented functions. 



HOS 108 Table Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with practical knowledge and skills of various types of service operations. The student will gain knowl- 
edge and an appreciation of the relationship between "front" and "back" of the house. Emphasis is also placed on management skills needed for 
bar and dining room management 

HOS 109 Hospitality Purchasing 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies in detail major groups of food purchased by quantity buyers including fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy products, 
meats and seafood, processed products, beverages and non-food items. Outlines the essentials of effective food and beverage control while estab- 
lishing systems for sale values for food and beverages. 

HOS 110 Meat Cutting 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces meat cutting. The student will gain knowledge in the breakdown of beef, pork, poultry, lamb, and veal. 



197 



HOS 111 Yeast Breads I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 105 - Introduction to Baking. Prepares students to produce a variety of yeast raised breads and rolls using both straight dough 
and sponge dough methods. Emphasizes proper mixing, fermentation, make-up proofing and baking. 

HOS 112 Yeast Breads II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 105 - Introduction to Baking. Prepares students to produce a variety of pastries. Emphasizes proper proofing, baking and fin- 
ishing. Focuses on sanitation, hygienic work habits and conformance with health regulations. 

HOS 113 Baking Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid, HOS 102 - Basic Foods Theory and Skills, HOS 105 - Introduction to Baking. Explores the 
science of baking and the different reactions that take place based on the ingredients, temperatures and equipment in relation to the final product. 

HOS 114 Hospitality Organization and Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Analyzes management's functions and responsibilities as they pertain to the hospitality industry. Appropriate styles of hospi- 
tality leadership are covered. 

HOS 115 Diet Therapy 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents to food services employees or prospective employees of health care institutions knowledge about basic nutrition, 
therapeutic diets and menu pl annin g; students use knowledge by writing menus. Practicum required as an integral part of the course. 

HOS 116 Dietary Management I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes specifications, storage, purchasing and storage, feeding in emergencies, sanitation, and safety in a format designed 
for food service required as an integral part of the course. 

HOS 117 Dietary Management II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes specifications, storage, purchasing and preparation of food, recipe standardization, kitchen designs and delivery sys- 
tems in format designed for food service employees or employees of health care institutions. Practicum required as an integral part of the course. 

HOS 118 Resident Clinical Assessment Practicum 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the student to the residential care environment and provides the opportunity for the student to learn how to com- 
plete residential nutritional status assessments, evaluate resident nutritional needs, complete the required resident evaluation instruments and to 
write appropriate nutrition care. 

HOS 128 Total Quality Management (TQM) In Restaurant Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with practical knowledge and skills of restaurant operations through TQM. Emphasis is placed on forming 
an organizational team from traditional "front and back-of-the house" roles. In addition various types of service for food and beverages are taught 
to demonstrate the versatility of the industry. 

HOS 144 Customer Relations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the key principles of quality service by understanding the service product, the service environment, the tools of 
service, the service needs of the customer and the application of service principles. 

HOS 150 The Tourism System 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies travel trends and modes and the social, environmental and economic impacts on the destination area. Emphasis is 
placed on local, regional and national tourism. 

HOS 151 Introduction to Convention/Meeting Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a general overview of the convention, exposition and meeting industry, and explores the career options within the 
industry. Includes an essential understanding of the components involved in the operation of successful meetings and conventions. 

HOS 152 The Mechanics of Meeting Planning 3 Credits . 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an in-depth study of the meeting and convention industry. Focuses on the operational aspects of the various industry 
segments and the intra-industry interactions of each. The text is one of the main components used to study for the Certified Meeting Professional 
(CMP) examination. 

HOS 153 The Development and Management of Attractions 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the process of developing visitor attractions and discusses the issues involved in their management Course content 
contains information geared toward achieving certain competency objectives. 

HOS 201 Hospitality Organization and Human Resources Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches the necessary skills for proper recruiting, staffing, training and managing employees at various levels in hospitality 
careers. Emphasizes the organization's evolutionary and problem solving process. 

HOS 202 Fish and Seafood _ 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 109 - Hospitality Purchasing. Discusses the importance offish and seafood in today's market Includes types and categories of 
American and imported fish and shellfish and proper buying, storage, preparation and merchandising offish and seafood. Provides experience in 
boning, cutting and cooking methods appropriate for seafood. 



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HOS 203 Menu, Design, and Layout 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides the skills needed to apply the principles of menu planning to various types of facilities and services. This course 
covers menu layout, selection and development and pricing structures. 

HOS 204 Food and Beverage Cost Control 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces mathematical principles applied to the food service industry and uses skills to complete food related tasks. 

HOS 205 Food and Beverage Cost Control Applications 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the principles and procedures involved in an effective system of room, food, beverage, labor and sales income. 
Emphasizes the development and use of standards in the calculation of cost. 

HOS 206 Fundamentals of the Catering Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid and FST 102 - Food Service Equipment Operations. Introduces the fundamentals of owning 
and operating a small catering business including personal, legal and operational requirements. 

HOS 207 Advanced Baking and Chocolates 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers classical French and European desserts. Includes the preparation of goods such as Napoleons, Gateaux St. Honore, 

petits fours and petits fours sec, ganaches, pastry creams and fillings, sauces, flans and tarts and European sponges. Includes tempering of choco- sa^e 

lates, molding and chocolate plastique, preparation of truffles, pastilage and marzipan, short doughs, and meringues. Requires students to submit 

three pieces from the American Culinary Federation approved individual pastry display category to be judged as a final practical exam. 

HOS 208 Cakes, Icings, and Fillings 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 105 - Introduction to Baking. Requires students to produce and finish a variety of cakes. Emphasizes application techniques, 
color coordination, and the flavor and texture of fillings. Practices the techniques of basic cake decorating. Emphasizes sanitation, hygienic work 
habits and conformance with health regulations. 

HOS 209 Advanced Decorating and Candies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 208 - Cakes, Icings, and Fillings. Presents the six different classical styles of cake decorating, the production of gum paste 
objects which accompany the styles, the use of royal icings and investigates the similarities and differences between the six styles. Students will 
be required to produce examples of each style and technique, to include two practical examinations. 

HOS 210 Classical Cuisine 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents advanced and sophisticated classical culinary methods following the principles and techniques of Escoffier. Studies 
cooking techniques, timing, presentation, history and terms pertaining to classical foods and menus with emphasis on French cuisines. Provides 
practical experience in table service operation, kitchen coordination and timing. 



HOS 212 Garde Manger 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 106 - Pantry and Breakfast. Illustrates basic garde manger principles and the functions and duties of the garde manger depart- 
ment as they relate and integrate with other kitchen operations. Students will focus on introduction to specialty work which includes ice carving, 
artistic centerpieces and buffet decorations. They will demonstrate equipment and garde manger area planning. 

HOS 213 Classical Pastries 3 Credits 

The student, through hands on application, will learn the preparation and elegant presentation of an abundance of classical and modem pastries 
and desserts including Tarts, Flans, Gateau Saint-Honore', Black Forest Cake, Chocolate Ganache Cake, Truffles, Paris-Brest, Petits Fours, Rum 
Balls, Napoleons, Charlottes, Bavarians, Meringues, Chocolate Preparations, Pastillage, Marizipan, and Sugar Work. The student will be instruct- 
ed in the latest preparation methods, innovative ideas for impressive plate presentations, and techniques that utilize equipment and tools such as 
silicone baking mats, stencils, trowels, and acetate or polyurethane strips, to make high-tech, nouvelle creations. 

HOS 214 Hospitality Law and Security 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an awareness of the rights and responsibilities that the law grants to or imposes upon a hotel keeper. Illustrates the 
possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations . 

HOS 216 Hospitality Marketing and Group Sales 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents a practical understanding of the operating statement and precisely where, how and why the sales effort fits into total 
earnings and profit. Teaches how to measure and gauge accurately the precise worth of every type of business in advance. 

HOS 221 Catering Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid, CUL 1 10 - Meat Cutting, HOS 204 - Food and Beverage Cost Control, and CUL 202 - 
Specialized Cuisine. Provides instruction in the fundamentals of catering including the business of supplying food, goods and organized service 
for public and private functions. Includes staffing, equipment, transportation, contracting, special arrangements, beverage service and menu plan- 
ning. Demonstrates techniques of setting up banquets and buffets. Requires students to plan, budget, cost, test recipes and formats, plan decor, 
service and entertainment for catered events. 

HOS 270 Merchandising 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 112 - Yeast Breads n. Requires students to produce yeast raised and plasticized/sweet dough products for limited retail sale 
for a 12-week period. Studies merchandising and marketing, planning, production, controlling scrap, cash recaps and all pertinent phases of a 
retail bake shop operation. 



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HOS 280 Co-op/Internship/Externship/Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Requires students to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience 
while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

HOS 281-294 Special Topics in Hospitality Administration 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of 
interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

HOS 280 Co-op/Internship/Externship/Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Requires students to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience 
while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

HOS 281-294 Special Topics in Hospitality Administration 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of 
interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

HPP 111 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credits 

This course introduces beginning students to the recurring problems, ideas and thought systems as represented in the literature and lives of great 
thinkers. 3 class hours. 

HPP 212 Introduction to Ethics 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. 
This course is a study of the morality of human behavior. In an ongoing discussion of current issues like euthanasia, civil disobedience, abor- 
tion, conservation, pacifism, premarital sex, human rights, etc., questions are raised about the meaning of right and wrong, the verification of 
moral propositions, and the norms of human conduct. 3 class hours. 

HPP 213 Logic 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 032, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)420 or greater, or appropriate placement test scores. A 
course in formal logic. A study of the principles and methods employed in the appraisal of arguments and methodology, which will lead one's 
think ing to the accurate attainment of truth. 3 class hours. 

HPP 220 Philosophy of Religion 3 Credits 

A course designed to study the origin and nature of religion. After an initial review of recent philosophical analysis of the religious experience, 
major world religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, et al.) are examined for their specific content, struc- 
ture, and spirit. 3 class hours. 

HSS 100 Theatre Appreciation 3 Credits 

An introduction to the understanding and appreciation of the theatre's role in the modern world, including a survey of dramatic structure and 
analysis and the functions of the actor, director, designer and critic. 3 class hours. 

HSS 148 Interpersonal Communication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 03 1 and HEW 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement 
test scores. A course providing theory, actual practice, and criticism for examining and changing human interactions in work, family, and social 
contexts. The course will focus on perception, message encoding and decoding, feedback, listening skills, causes for communication break- 
downs, and other elements affecting interpersonal communication. 3 class hours. 

HSS 201 Voice and Articulation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 03 1 and HEW 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement 
test scores. A course designed to assist students to understand the anatomy and function of their own voice mechanism. Emphasis will be placed 
on breathing, phonation, resonation, and articulation in acceptable American speech. This course will require students to learn the International 
Phonetic Alphabet and evaluate their own speech characteristics such as quality, rate, pitch, and volume. Designed for education, pre-law, busi- 
ness, broadcast, general studies, theatre and/or speech majors. Required of speech majors at Indiana State University. 3 class hours. 

HSS 202 Oral Interpretation of Literature 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 03 1 and HEW 009, or recentered SAT Verbal score of (R)370 or greater, or appropriate placement 
test scores. A course designed to develop the students' ability to communicate literature to an audience and to augment the students' appreciation 
of literature. 3 class hours. 

HSY 101 Survey of American History I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing U and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College U or 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100). Covers major themes and events in American history from the discovery era to the Civil War and Reconstruction. 

HSY 102 Survey of American History II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing U and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100). Covers major themes and events in American history from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the present. 



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IDS 103 Motors and Motor Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 113 - Basic Electricity. Provides a complete understanding of all types of electric motors, extending from the small shaded 
pole fan motors to the large three-phase motors. Includes motor theory magnetism and how it affects motor rotation. Provides in-depth study of 
motor starting components and protective devices for motor circuits. Includes heat dissipation from a motor, motor slippage, how motors are 
wired to obtain different speeds, and capacitors and how they affect a motor circuit. 

IDS 104 Fluid Power Basics 3 Credits 

Corequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra or advisor approval. Introduces the student to fluid power principles and components. Teaches basic cir- 
cuit design, symbols and schematic diagrams to build a foundation for career work in fluid power technology. 

IDS 114 Introductory Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides basic skills and fundamental knowledge in oxyacetylene and shielded metal welding for maintenance welders, auto a. 

service and body technicians and individuals in the mining industry. Emphasizes industry welding practices and detailed study of techniques used 
in all weld positions. Covers brazing and flame cutting and electrode selection and uses. Emphasizes safe practices in welding, cutting and shield- 
ed metal arc. 



ILT 217 Wastewater Analysis 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Deals with the chemical and biological analysis of wastewater. Major pollutants of water are determined and 
quantified. The wastewater treatment steps are discussed to determine ideal lab sampling locations. Various wastewater tests such as BOD's, 
COD's, sedimentation rates and biological examinations are performed. 



IMT 203 Machine Maintenance/Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines procedures for the removal, repair and installation of machine components. Analyzes methods of installation, 
lubrication practices and maintenance procedures for industrial machinery. Presents techniques for calibration and repair of electro-mechanical 
devices and practice in computations pertaining to industrial machinery. 

IMT 205 Programmable Controllers I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Introduces the basic theory, operation and programming of programmable controllers. Includes pilot 
control devices, circuit layouts, industrial schematics, relay logic, reduced voltage starters and multi-speed controllers. Covers static control sys- 
tems. Demonstrates with programming examples, set-up examples and troubleshooting as well as PLC timin g, counting, arithmetic and logic. 



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IMT 107 Preventive Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Focuses on detecting and correcting potential trouble spots and scheduling routine inspections with checklists. 
Studies five essential forms of preventive maintenance: equipment record, checklist, inspection schedule, inspection report and equipment cost 
record. 

IMT 108 Measurements and Calibration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. TEC 113 - Basic Electricity. Provides instruction in the purpose, function and application of oscilloscopes and 
related instruments. 

IMT 110 Coupling and Alignment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the concepts of correct alignment of industrial process machinery. Provides instruction in troubleshooting and 
repair of coupled machines. 

IMT 111 Rigging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the proper techniques of moving industrial machinery and equipment. Emphasis is placed on proper installation, 
inspection, safety requirements and load calculation. 

IMT 112 Sheet Metal Layout and Design 3 Credits * 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the procedures used to layout sheet metal components. Presents the proper use of hand and machine tools to fabri- 
cate sheet metal projects. 

■I 

IMT 120 Metallurgy Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the fundamentals of thermodynamics and reactions occurring in metals subjected to various kinds of heat treatment. mm^s 

Includes classification and properties of metals, chemical and physical metallurgy, theory of alloys, heat treatment principles as applied to ferrous 

and non-ferrous materials, test to determine uses, heat treatment for steels, special steels, and cast iron, powder metallurgy, and use of gas and 

electric furnaces and their controls. "1H 



IMT 122 Electrical Wiring Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers National Electrical Code and its relationship to residential and commercial wiring. Includes mechanical installation nc 

of hardware, metering equipment, lights, switches and design. Discusses tool use and materials selection. 

IMT 201 Fluid Power Systems (Hydraulics/Pneumatics) 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IDS 104 - Fluid Power Basics. Introduces the student to more complex fluid power circuits. Requires students to design, analyze 

and troubleshoot complex circuits using schematic diagrams. Studies detailed construction of typical industrial fluid power components. Teaches ,,-53* 

students to disassemble and evaluate fluid power components in the lab. 



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IMT 206 Programmable Controllers II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IMT 205 - Programmable Controllers I. Provides an in-depth study of programmable controllers. Emphasizes program language 
installation, maintenance and applications. 

IMT 207 Electrical Circuits 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IDS 103 - Motors and Motor Controls, MAT 121 - Geometry-Trigonometry or advisor approval, TEC - 113 Basic Electricity. 
Provides fundamentals of single- and three-phase alternating current including parallel circuits, resistance, inductance, capacitance, switching, 
fusing, current requirements, transformer applications, and motors and motor controls. Covers the basics of mechanical and electrical installa- 
tions, emphasizes tool use and material selection and electrical troubleshooting diagnosis and repair. 

IMT 210 Pumps 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IDS 104 - Fluid Power Basics. Covers the construction and operation of centrifugal, reciprocating and rotary pumps and their com- 
ponents. Includes procedures of troubleshooting, installation and maintenance. 

IMT 211 Advanced Industrial Mechanics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IDS 103 - Motors and Motor Controls, IMT 122 - Electrical Wiring Fundamentals, IMT 201 - Fluid Power Systems, IMT 203 - 
Machine Maintenance/Installation, and PHY 101 - Physics I. Examines the operation and design of mechanical systems including belt drives, 
chain drives, gear boxes, bearings and variable speed drives. Includes the proper use of portable power tools and the study of different materials. 

IMT 212 Advanced Industrial Mechanics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IMT 211 - Advanced Industrial Mechanics I. Continues Advanced Industrial Mechanics I with troubleshooting of the various 
mechanical drive systems. Includes the study of lubrication, seals, industrial pumps, steam distribution systems and HVAC systems. 

IMT 213 Pipe Fitting Basics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IDS 102 - Introduction to Print Reading. Acquaints the maintenance technician with a basic foundation and pipe fitting skills neces- 
sary to make repairs or new pipe layout. Includes determination of the type and quantity of material needed to complete a task and joining those 
materials in the proper manner with a minim um of supervision. 

IMT 215 Power Plant Mechanics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IMT 207 - Electrical Circuits, MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Presents the basic elements in the power plant: their function, then- 
mode of operation and the mechanics, with emphasis on construction and repair. The student selects, troubleshoots and repairs power plant 
mechanics. 

IVY 070 College and Life Success Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment at the ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51) and ENG 031 - 
Reading Strategies for College I level (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Enhances success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills 
necessary to reach their educational, career and life objectives. Topics include time management, memory techniques, reading techniques, note 
taking, test taking, problem solving and decision making, group interaction and resource utilization. 

IVY 071 Study Skills Survey 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment at the ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51) and ENG 031 - 
Reading Strategies for College I level (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Increases success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills 
necessary to reach their educational objectives. Students will learn effective strategies for studying for tests, dealing with test anxiety, answering a 
variety of types of test questions (multiple choice, true/false, matching, short answer and essay) and analyzing test results. Students also will learn 
time management techniques, memory strategies, textbook reading and notetaking methods. 

IVY 072 Research Strategies 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment at the ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51) and ENG 031 - 
Reading Strategies for College I level (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Increases success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills 
necessary to reach their educational objectives, specifically in the area of information literacy. In this course students will learn how to use a vari- 
ety of research tools including CD-ROM databases, the Internet and other research tools. Students will learn how to use the MLA or APA docu- 
mentation when summarizing, paraphrasing and quoting resources. Students will also be exposed to some of the basic issues concerning informa- 
tional integrity. 

IVY 073 Styles of Learning 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment at the ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51) and ENG 031 - 
Reading Strategies for College I level (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Increases success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills 
necessary to reach their educational objectives. The course presents a holistic, integrated, principle-centered approach for solving academic chal- 
lenges. This course is a step-by-step learning process which provides effective tools that help students adapt to change. 

IVY 100 Prior Learning Assessment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students an opportunity to document and present college level learning which has resulted from work/life experi- 
ence. At the conclusion of this course students will submit a complete learning portfolio which consists of a request for college credits along with 
a detailed description of college level competencies for each course and documentation to support their request. 

LEG 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Must be program-ready in English (both reading and writing). Introduces the beginning student to the American legal system, sub- 
stantive and procedural law, and the role of the paralegal in the legal profession. Topics include professional ethics, legal analysis and research, 
trial and appelate courts, civil and criminal trial procedure and brief surveys of the substantive law of torts, contracts, property and criminal law. 
Projects include an IRAC brief, library research of a statute and related case and drafting a summons, complaint and answer. 

202 



LEG 102 Legal Research 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. Introduces the student to library research resources including case reporters, digests, 
statutes and administrative codes, registers, law encyclopedias and other secondary authorities. Students are instructed on effective research 
strategies, proper citation form and Shepard's updating service. The final research and writing project is a memorandum of law. 

LEG 103 Civil Procedure 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. The first of two semesters devoted to the study of the Indiana trial rules, small claims 
court rules and local rules. (The second semester is LEG 202 - Advanced Trial Procedures.) Topics include filin g requirements, the rules regard- 
ing service of process and calculation of deadlines. Projects include drafting summonses, complaints, answers and various motions. 

LEG 104 Torts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. A survey of the common law of negligence, strict liability (including products liabili- 
ty), intentional torts against persons and property, various defenses and insurance issues in tort law. Emphasis is on tort litigation practice, espe- 
cially personal injury law. Projects include drafting tort complaints and discovery documents. 

LEG 105 Business Associations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. Introduces the student to the distinguishing characteristics of sole proprietorships, 
general and limited partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations. Topics include the formal requirements for establishing and doing 
business in each of these types of business organizations in Indiana, respective advantages and disadvantages of each type, relevant tax law 
issues, a brief introduction to the elements of a contract, common-law doctrines of employment law and agency law. Students will review many 
sample documents and will draft a general partnership agreement and a certificate of assumed business name. 

LEG 106 Torts and Claims Investigation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. Prepares the student to investigate tort claims. Instruction includes a brief survey of 
tort law and evidence law, proper interviewing techniques, information-gathering methods and resources and investigative file preparation. 
Special attention is given to the importance of knowing the elements of possible causes of action and the laws of evidence at the investigative 
stage of a case. Students will review sample complaints and forms. Projects include some legal research, preparing a demand letter, a complaint, 
an interview questionnaire, consent forms, letters requesting records and reports and a witness statement. 

LEG 107 Contracts and Commercial Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. Examines the nature of contracts under both the common law and UCC Article 2 
including contract formation, the Statute of Frauds, remedies, warranties and assignment law. The student will also be introduced to agency law, 
employment law, negotiable instruments law (UCC Article 3), secured transactions law (UCC Article 9) and the important differences among 
various types of business organizations. Students will examine and critique actual contracts and will have the opportunity to review Article 3 and 
Article 9 documents. Written projects include critiquing a contract, drafting a contract and drafting a complaint for breach of contract. 

■ 
LEG 108 Property Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. A survey of the law of real and personal property in Indiana. Introduces the student to 
the different types of property, how ownership is acquired, estates in land, concurrent ownership, deeds, legal descriptions, easements, taxes and 
other encumberances on title, tile examination and insurance, the BFP, real estate sales and closings, mortgages and security interests, foreclo- 
sures, landlord-tenant law, gifts, trusts, bailments and lost property. Students will examine numerous documents and will leam to draft some, 
including a warranty deed, a mechanics hen and a complaint for foreclosure or eviction. M 

LEG 202 Advanced Trial Procedures 3 Credits __ 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 103 - Civil Procedures. The study of Indiana trial rules pertaining to actual trial. 
Topics include the discovery process and discovery tools, litigation support ~ including organization and retrieval of trial documents ~ tech- 
niques in preparing witnesses for trial and preparing jury instructions. The main project is compiling a trial notebook. 

LEG 203 Law Office Management and Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 102 - Legal Research and Writing, CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. 
Acquaints the student with various law office-specific software packages and services and their application in the law office. Through hands-on 
computer experience students work with spreadsheets, database management, time keeping and filing, docket control, litigation support and legal 
research on the Internet and legal research computer services such as Westlaw and Lexis. 

LEG 204 Legal Writing 3 Credits q 

Prerequisites: Should be taken in the last semester before graduation. Develops further the legal writing skills learned in Legal Research and 

Writing and in the procedural law and substantive law courses. Gives renewed emphasis to the importance of precision and accuracy in preparing 

correspondence, briefs and memos, litigation documents and transactional documents. To demonstrate mastery of these skills students prepare 

and compile into a portfolio examples of their best work in each category. ■■' 



LEG 209 Family Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 108 - Property Law. An introduction to the statutory laws of marriage, dissolu- 
tion, custody (including UCCJA), visitation, support (including URESA), adoption and guardianship of minors in Indiana. Students will review 
many pleadings and intake forms and will draft a divorce petition, a financial statement and a summary decree with child-support worksheet. 

LEG 210 Wills, Trusts, and Probate 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 108 - Property Law. An introduction to the Indiana statutory law of wills, intes- 
tate succession, estate administration, death taxes (state and federal), trusts, power of attorney and guardianship. Students will be able to examine 
many actual probate documents and forms and will draft a will, a petition to open an estate and an inheritance tax return. 

203 



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LEG 211 Criminal Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 103 - Civil Procedures. A theoretical and practical survey of the statutory law of 
crimes, evidence and criminal procedures in Indiana including an examination of sample pleadings and motions. Topics include the elements of 
specific crimes, formal procedures for pre-trial to post-trial, actual courtroom strategies and the practical concerns involved in both the prosecu- 
tion and defense of criminal cases. 

LEG 212 Bankruptcy Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 108 - Property Law. A survey of the Federal Bankruptcy Act, including the dif- 
ferent kinds of bankruptcy proceedings. Emphasizes how to accumulate the debtor's financial information, compile initial schedules, prepare the 
list of creditors, collect and organize data for the first meeting of creditors, complete proofs of claim and pursue certain creditors' rights. The 
main written project is preparing the forms for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case. 

LEG 280 Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 102 - Legal Research and Writing, LEG 103 - Civil Procedures, LEG 106 - 
Torts and Claims Investigation, CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. An opportunity for the intermediate paralegal student to acquire valu- 
able field experience by working gratis 120 hours (at least eight hours per week) in a local law office under attorney supervision. The student 
keeps a journal and prepares a report of his or her experience at the end of the semester. 

LEG 281-294 Special Topics in Paralegal Studies 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 102 - Legal Research and Writing, LEG 103 - Civil Procedures, LEG 106 - 
Torts and Claims Investigation, LEG 202 - Advanced Trial Procedures and at least two paralegal electives. Provides students with the opportunity 
to attend seminars, workshops and other instructional activities and/or do independent study on topics of interest that reinforce the concepts 
taught in or relevant to Paralegal Studies. Requires the supervision and approval of the Paralegal Program Chair. 

MAT 044 Mathematics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency on the numerical skills section of the assessment (ASSET 32-40, COMPASS 19-43). Reviews fractions 
and decimals. Concentrates on ratio, proportion, percents, measurement, signed numbers, equations and their applications. 

MAT 050 Basic Algebra 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MAT 044 - Mathematics or demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (numerical skills 
section - ASSET 41+, COMPASS 44-100), (pre-algebra section - ASSET 23-38, COMPASS 0-40). Reviews signed numbers and simple equation 
solving. Concentrates on integer exponents, scientific notation, linear and literal equations, polynomial operations, polynomial factoring, and 
graphing skills in preparation for MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics. 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled score of 40 or higher on the Elementary Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or a COMPASS score of 41-65 on the 
Algebra section, or successful completion of MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Reviews algebraic terminology and laws, basic operations with real num- 
bers and polynomials, scientific notation, linear equations and graphs, and factoring algebraic expressions. Provides an in-depth study of rational 
expressions, systems of linear equations, radicals, radical equations and quadratic equations. Introduces functions and function notation. 

MAT 112 Functional Mathematics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled score of 40 or higher on the Elementary Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or a COMPASS score of 41-65 on the 
Algebra section, or successful completion of MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Through real-world approaches, presents mathematical concepts of 
measurement, proportion, geometry, equation solving and statistics. 

MAT 115 Statistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled score of 41 or higher on the Intermediate Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or a COMPASS score of 66 or high- 
er on the Algebra section, or successful completion of MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Provides study in 
the collection, interpretation and presentation of descriptive and inferential statistics including measures of central tendency, probability, binomial 
and normal distributions, hypothesis testing of one- and two-sample populations, confidence intervals, chi-square testing, correlation, data 
description and graphical representations. 

MAT 121 Geometry-Trigonometry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A raw score of 13 or higher on the Geometry section of the ASSET assessment, or successful completion of MAT 111 - 
Intermediate Algebra or MAT 1 12 - Functional Mathematics. Provides study in geometry and trigonometry including polygons, similar figures, 
geometric solids, properties of circles, constructions, right triangles, angle measurements in radians and degrees, trigonometric functions and their 
application to right triangles, Pythagorean theorem, laws of sine and cosine, graphing of trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, vectors 
and coordinate conversions. 

MAT 131 Algebra/Trigonometry I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled score of 41 or higher on the Intermediate Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or successful completion of MAT 
1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Provides study in algebra, including functions, exponential rules, linear equations, radicals, vectors, right triangle 
trigonometry, oblique triangles, graphs of sine and cosine functions. 

MAT 132 Algebra/Trigonometry II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated mathematics competency through test-out or successful completion of MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. 
Continues study in algebra and trigonometry including systems of equations, graphing of trigonometric functions, trigonometric equations, rec- 
tangular and polar coordinates, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions and conies. 

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MAT 133 College Algebra 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled score of 41 or higher on the Intermediate Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or successful completion of MAT 
111 - Intermediate Algebra. Presents an in-depth study of polynomials, radicals, rational expressions, inequalities, complex numbers, functions, 
matrices, graphs and conies. 

MAT 134 Trigonometry 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled scored of 41 or higher on the Intermediate Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or successful completion of MAT 
1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Presents an in-depth study of vectors, right triangle trigonometry, oblique triangles, graphs of trigonometric functions 
and an introduction to complex numbers. 

MAT 135 Finite Math 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled score of 41 or higher on the College Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or a COMPASS score of 46 or higher on 
the College Algebra section, or successful completion of MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Surveys solving and graphing linear inequalities, ele- 
mentary set theory, matrices and their applications, linear programming and elementary probability. 

MAT 201 Brief Calculus 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A COMPASS score of 46 or higher on the Trigonometry section (ASSET cannot be used), or MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra and 
one of the following: MAT 121 Geometry-Trigonometry, MAT 132 - Algebra/Trigonometry n, MAT 133 - College Algebra or MAT 135 - Finite 
Math. Studies the fundamental concepts and operations of calculus including the study of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, points-of- 
inflection, first-derivative test, concavity, second-derivative test, optimization, antiderivatives, integration by substitution, integration by parts, 
and elementary applications of a definite integral. 

MEA 102 First Aid and CPR 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information necessary to recognize emergency situations, know the proper course of action with dif- 
ferent types of emergencies, and apply appropriate first aid including CPR. 

MEA 113 Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Discusses the most common medications in current use with emphasis on classifications, 

uses, routes of administration, dosages, interactions, incompatibilities and side effects. Emphasizes the 50 most commonly prescribed drugs listed , 1<t 

in Pharmacy Times. Addresses special precautions, legal aspects, patient education, and preparation and administration of medications. 

MEA 114 Medical Assisting Laboratory Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Prepares student to perform various basic laboratory procedures including preparation of 
patients, collecting and preparing appropriate specimens and expected norms of laboratory test results. Includes current safety and quality control 
standards. 

MEA 120 Medical Assisting Clinical Externship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Provides opportunities to observe, perform and discuss various clinical competencies under supervision, 
with learning experiences obtained in selected physician's offices, clinics or hospitals. Reviews the following basic principles of psychology as 
they apply to the medical assistant: developmental stages of the life cycle; hereditary, cultural and environmental influences on behavior; mental 
health; and applied psychology. 

MEA 121 Medical Assisting Administrative Externship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Provides opportunities to observe, perform and discuss various administrative competencies under 
supervision, with learning experiences obtained in selected physicians' offices, clinics or hospitals. 

MEA 131 Medical Financial Management with Computer Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction in medical office financial administration, bookkeeping and materials management. 

MEA 135 Medical Word Processing/Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Keyboard 25 WPM. Develops skills and knowledge of medical dictation, machine transcription and use of word processors and 
typewriters. Includes typing and transcription of medical reports, terminology and correspondence. 

MEA 136 Office Administration with Computer Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstration of computer keyboard skills through test out on speed, accuracy and formatting or OAD 019 - Keyboarding. 
Provides a basic understanding of the administrative duties and responsibilities pertinent to medical offices. Includes instruction in medical corre- 
spondence and records, case histories of patients, filing, telephone procedures, appointment scheduling, receptionist duties and processing mail. 
Familiarizes the student with computer applications in the health care setting. Provides the student with basics of operations and application of 
computer usage within the health care provider office. Includes simulated data entry for patient records, appointment scheduling and daysheet 
transactions. 

MEA 137 Medical Insurance and Basic Coding with Computer Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HHS 101 - Medical Terminology and demonstration of computer keyboard skills through test out on speed, accuracy and format- 
ting or OAD 019 - Keyboarding. Provides an overview of medical insurance programs and the skills needed in handling insurance forms, CPT 
and ICD-9-CM Coding and insurance reports as applied to the medical office. Includes simulated computer data entry for patient records, proce- 
dure and diagnostic codes, insurance processing and electronic transmission of claims. 



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MEA 138 Clinical I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: HHS 101 - Medical Terminology, currently CPR trained (Health Care Provider) or HHS 104 - CPR and Basic 
Health Awareness and MEA advisor approval. Presents theory and lab related to clinical aspects of the medical office. Provides students with 
information necessary to recognize emergency situations, know the proper course of action with different types of emergencies and apply appro- 
priate first aid. Allows students to become familiar with clinical duties and to gain the skills needed to perform them. Includes vital signs, asep- 
sis, sterilization, nutrition and treatment room procedures. 

MEA 139 Clinical n 3 Credits 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: MEA 138 - Clinical I and MEA advisor approval. Presents a continuation of clinical skills and theory and allows 
the student to become familiar with the following clinical duties: medications, EKGs, X-ray, physical therapy, respiratory testing and other tech- 
nical skills needed to assist the physician. 

MEA 164 Human Energies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Discusses communication skills, including verbal and nonverbal, body language and intuition. Helps the student develop an 
understanding of body circuits and energy transference. 

MEA 169 Administrative Training 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a basic understanding of the administrative responsibilities pertinent to massage therapy. Addresses computer 
usage, marketing and office skills that will allow students to create, promote and maintain their own businesses. 

MEA 203 Disease Conditions 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents the basic concepts of diseases, their course, and functional disturbances as they relate to body systems. Includes the 
precipitating risk factors and appropriate methods of patient education regarding various disease processes. 

MEA 209 Electrocardiograph - Basic Technique 1 Credit 

Corequisites: MEA 210 - Introduction to EKG Interpretation. Presents the basic reasons for prescribing an electrocardiograph and the theory 
involved. The physiological principles involved are the basis for proper techniques that will be practiced by the students until they demonstrate 
competency with both the theory and required skills in doing a prescribed electrocardiograph. 

MEA 210 Introduction to EKG Interpretation 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system and recognition of basic arrhythmias. Measurement of the 
EKG complex will be taught with the emphasis placed upon determining heart rates and rhythms. 

MEA 206 Advanced Electrocardiograph Interpretation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 210 - Introduction to EKG Interpretation. Includes anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, interpretation of 
rhythm strips and 12 lead EKGs and the cardiovascular drugs associated with arrhythmias. 

MEA 212 Phlebotomy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None - Medical Assisting Laboratory Techniques or program advisor approval. Presents the principles and practices of laboratory 
specimen collection and processing. Also covers medical terminology, infection control, patient identification, anatomy and physiology, anticoag- 
ulants, blood collection, specimen processing and interpersonal skills. 

MEA 213 Advanced Insurance Coding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 137 - Medical Insurance or program advisor approval. Introduces the medical office administrator to codes necessary to bill 
insurance claims and provides experience in coding claim forms using the correct combination of codes to maximize reimbursement. 

MEA 215 Advanced Medical Terminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HHS 101 - Medical Terminology. Includes more detailed and advanced study of the derivatives of medical terms, symbols, and 
signs. Presents an in-depth study of the correlation between medical vocabulary and the application of those terms to the anatomy and physiology 
of the body, related diseases, conditions and treatment. 

MEA 224 Hospital Coding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 213 - Advanced Insurance Coding or advisor approval. Builds on the comprehensive coding skills acquired through prerequi- 
site course MEA 213. Introduces additional instruction in diagnostic related groups (DRG's) and medical record extraction. Provides discussion, 
observation and performance opportunities in related insurance coding competencies. Both classroom and clinical sites are used to provide realis- 
tic experiences under supervision. External sites include physicians' offices, clinics and hospitals. 

MEA 225 Insurance Coding Externship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides opportunities to observe, perform, and discuss various insurance related competencies under supervi- 
sion, with learning experience obtained in selected physicians' offices, clinics, or hospitals. 

MEA 226 Medical Assisting - Advanced Clinical Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 138, 139 - Clinical Theory and MEA 134 - Clinical Skills Lab. Advances the knowledge and skills enabling the student to 
assist in clinical management in the medical and surgical specialties. Addresses health services in the community which are directed toward pre- 
vention of disease and maintenance and restoration of health. 

MEA 227 Advanced Administrative Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 136 - Medical Office Administration. Provides an in-depth study of various influences on office functions concerning organi- 
zation and management of a physician's office. Includes government and professional sources for consultation. 

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MEA 233 Health Unit Coordinator 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Prepares students to provide reception and clerical support to the nursing unit to facilitate the delivery of nursing care. 
Students will gain skills in communication methods, problem solving, transcription processes, classification of orders and appropriate documenta- 
tion procedures. 

MEA 234 Phlebotomy Externship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 212 - Phlebotomy. Provides the opportunity to discuss and perform phlebotomy procedures under supervision with learning 
experiences obtained in selected laboratories, physicians' offices, clinics or hospitals. 



MEA 281-294 Special Topics in Medical Assistant 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on 
topics of interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 



o 



MEA 235 Advanced Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 135 - Medical Wordprocessing/Transcription. Improves accuracy and speed of the medical transcriptionist utilizing various 
formats for medical transcription. 

MEA 260 Advanced Acupressure 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 165 - Acupressure Theory and Methods. Focuses on the advanced theory and practice of acupressure and Asian medicine. 

MEA 261 Reflexology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches the different aspects and points on the foot and hand relating to other parts of the body. Can be integrated into mas- 
sage practice or can be an independent approach. Includes an introduction to the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular and nervous systems and their 
relationship to the zones on the feet. Systems disorders including the sensory and the endocrine are also identified and discussed. Identifies the 
relationship of the five zones of the foot and the areas of the spine with spinal nerve enervation and intervention. 

MEA 262 Sports Therapy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents an advanced course in sports massage designed to train the therapist techniques for therapy on athletes. Includes 
post/pre-event techniques with increased stretching and deep muscle release. 



o 



MEA 299 CMA Comprehensive Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Advisor approval. Reviews the entire medical assisting program in preparation for the CMA registry examina- 
tion. Administration, clinical and general information are covered. Testing procedures are addressed. Emphasis is placed on job readiness and 
placement. The course earns continuing education units for graduate CMAs to fulfill their certification renewal requirements. 

MFG 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degrees with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. 
Gives students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while 
earning credit toward an associate degree. 

MIT 102 Introduction to Print Reading 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an introduction to reading and interpreting machine shop symbols, welding blueprints and working drawings used 
in trades and crafts. Focuses on dimension, shape, fabrication and assembly. Applies basic mathematics to the solution of print and performance 
problems. 

MIT 106 Intoduction to Workplace Safety I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Introduces the proper use of hand and power tools and measuring instruments in carpentry, blacksmithing, rig- 
ging and equipment, machinist and general shop. Includes structural steel and fabricating terms. 

MIT 260 Problem Solving Techniques and Teamwork 3 Credits »• » 

Prerequisites: Minimum 45 credits of general education and Manufacturing coursework completed or advisor approval. This course is generally 
part of the capstone experience for students who are ready to graduate from the Manufacturing and Industrial Technology program. The course 
should draw from a broad spectrum of the student's prior course work. Teamwork, communication skills, problem solving, quality, fundamental 
concepts of complexity theory relating to systems operations, etc. are relevant topics. 


MKT 101 Principles of Marketing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the marketing role in society and how it affects the marketing strategy. Emphasizes the marketing mix, product 

planning, and the effects of the demographic dimension on the consumer market. — g 

MKT 102 Principles of Selling 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the selling process. Includes the psychology of selling and develops skills through a series of sell- ; < : . 

ing situations. 

MKT 104 Promotion Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents management planning and oversight techniques for effectively communicating the results of the marketing strategy 
to customers. Provides a comprehensive overview of promotion methods as they interact in the marketing mix, which includes price, channel of 
distribution and product. Everything the company does has potential for promotional impact for the customers, which therefore requires effective 
management to pursue its marketing objectives in the target market. 

207 



MKT 110 Consumer Behavior 3 Credits 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing. Study of the basic principles of consumer behavior which offers insight into 
the buyer-seller relationship. Application of theories from psychology, social psychology, and economics are examined. Course examines con- 
cepts that have implications for marketing management decisions. 

MKT 201 Introduction to Market Research 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing and MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Presents basic 
research methods entailing procedures, questionnaire design, data analysis, and effectively communicating research results. 

MKT 202 Logistics/Purchasing Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing or BUS 101 - Introduction to Business. Introduces students to the framework of logistics, the logis- 
tics environment, customer services and materials management. Introduces material resources planning (MRP) and just-in-time (JIT) principles. 

MKT 204 Marketing Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Focuses on the analysis, implementation and control of marketing strategy. Emphasizes the major decisions 
management faces in its effort to harmonize the objectives and resources of the organization with the needs and opportunities of the marketplace. 

MKT 205 Principles of Insurance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the risks faced by business firms including property, liability and personal losses, and how they are handled. 
Presents insurance contracts and their uses. Includes an overview of life insurance, health and pension insurance, public policy, government regu- 
lations, and social insurance. 

MKT 207 Public Relations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides broad coverage of the public relations field and acquaints students with the role of effective internal and external 
public relations in business and industry. Examines the goals and benefits of public relations, the tools of the public relations practitioner, and the 
principles and trends of the field. 

MKT 219 Field Study/Cooperative Education 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides field 
experience within the framework of actual work experience in marketing. 

MKT 220 Principles of Retailing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing and MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Studies retailing 
concepts and practices including retail merchandise planning, buying, pricing, promotion and control in established retail operations. Attention is 
given to managerial and operational skills. 

MKT 240 Internet Marketing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers, MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing. Provides an introduction to the Internet as a mar- 
keting strategy including product, pricing, communication and distribution considerations. Profiles Internet users and market segments and 
reviews the Internet as a primary and secondary marketing research tool as well as a relationship marketing tool. Incorporates marketing imple- 
mentation and planning strategies. Discusses legal and ethical issues in Internet marketing. 

Ml 1 101 Introduction to Machining 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Instructs students in shop safety, industrial terminology, tools and machine tooling, measurement and layout. Includes labora- 
tory exercises to begin project completion of turning, milling and grinding applications. 

MTT 102 Turning Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Instructs students in shop safety and industrial terminology and provides laboratory experience toward project completion on 
the conventional lathe. 

MTT 103 Milling Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Instructs students in shop safety and industrial terminology and provides laboratory experience towards project completion 
on the vertical and/or horizontal millin g machine. 

MTT 104 Machinery Handbook 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Equivalent of MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining and its prerequisites as determined by advisor. Explores the intent and use of 
the machinery handbook. Applies principles and concepts in the machinery handbook to projects in the industry. 

MTT 108 Metrology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Instructs a student in mechanical precision measurement techniques and applications. Provides instruction and laboratory 
experiences in surface plate inspections, optical comparators, hardness testing and coordinate measuring machines (CMM). Discusses calibration 
and measurement system analysis. 

MTT 204 Abrasive Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes. Provides shop safety, industrial terminology and laboratory experiences on abrasive process- 
ing machines. Includes superabrasives technology processes. 



208 



MTT 208 CNC Programming I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry-Trigonometry or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I or advisor approval. Introduces two and three axis 
CNC machining. Develops the theory of programming in the classroom with application of the program accomplished on industry-type machines. 
Studies terminology of coordinates, cutter paths, angle cutting, and linear and circular interpolation. 

MTT 209 CNC Programming II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 208 - CNC Programming I or advisor approval. Expands on MTT 208, providing further study in computer-aided numerical 
control programming. Focuses on canned cycles, loops, macros, thread cycles, drilling and pocket milling cycles. 

MTT 220 CAD/CAM I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 208 - CNC Programming I, DCT 113 - Intermediate CAD, DSN 220 - Advanced CAD, or equivalent as determined by advi- 
sor. Covers the development of various machine routines. Introduces computer-assisted machining as it relates to automated milling and machin- 
ing centers. Emphasizes proper programming techniques, control familiarity, file data and machining functions. 

MTT 221 CAD/CAM U 3 Credits > . 

Prerequisites: MTT 220 - CAD/CAM I or equivalent as determined by advisor. Covers the development of 3-D shapes and the codes necessary to 
produce parts. Requires students to design a new product or modify an existing design. Includes creating surface curves. Focuses on creating tool 
paths for complex 3D surfaces. 

MTT 240 Machining Operations I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining, TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes. Continues MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining. 
Students will gain additional lab experience on the drill press, lathe, milling machine, surface grinder, o.d. grinder, tool post grinder and jig 
grinder. Measurement, layout and inspection are performed at the advanced level. Classroom activities concentrate on cutting tool terminology, 
screw thread terminology, taper calculations and the Machinery Handbook. Heat treating is also covered. 

MTT 241 Machining Operations II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining and MTT 102 - Turning Processes I. Emphasizes basic tool construction and close tolerance 
machining. Using the various types of equipment found in the laboratory, students rough machine, heat treat and precision grind detailed parts to 
tolerance of within .0005" consistently. Classroom activities concentrate on precision setup, inspection work and basic tool construction. 
Experience is also gained in basic conversational CNC programming. %■# 

MTT 242 CNC Machining 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 208 - CNC Programming I, MTT 241 - Machining Operations n, DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals, DCT 227 - Geometric 
Dimensioning and Tolerancing. Introduces and instructs the student in all aspects of Computer Numeric Control (CNC) machining. The student 
will program, set up and operate CNC mill s and lathes utilizing CAD/CAM for fixture and part design and verification. Students continually 
improve programming, set up and cycle time efficiency. Students inspect and document the quality of production parts and compare their per- 
formance with an industry benchmark for each project. 

MTT 243 Tool & Die Making I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining, MTT 102 - Turning Processes I, MTT 103 - Milling Processes I, MTT 208 - CNC 
Programming I. Focuses on construction of a two-state progressive die that incorporates interchangeable details. Each student manufactures a die 
that incorporates the parting principle and performs the following operations: forming, piercing and parting. In addition, lecture material covers 
computations on blank lengths and diameters, blanking and piercing operations, drawing, progression and timing. Experience is gained in CNC 
machining and progressive die troubleshooting. m 

MTT 250 Introduction to Machining Practicnm 3 Credits 

Concurrent with MTT 101 . Provides niachining laboratory and application activities to coordinate with the classroom and laboratory learning for 
MTT 101. Students work on advanced project completion using a variety of shop equipment in a systems approach. 

MTT 251 Machining Operations I Practicnm 3 Credits 

Concurrent with MTT 240. Provides machining laboratory and application activities to coordinate with the classroom and laboratory learning for 

Mil 240. Students work on advanced project completion using a variety of shop equipment in a systems approach. 

msss 

MTT 252 Machining Operations II Practicnm 3 Credits 

Concurrent with MTT 241 . Provides machining laboratory and application activities to coordinate with the classroom and laboratory learning for «, 
MTT 241 . Students work on advanced project completion using a variety of shop equipment in a systems approach. 

MTT 253 CNC Machining Practicum 3 Credits ,_ 

Concurrent with MTT 242. Provides machining laboratory and application activities to coordinate with the classroom and laboratory learning for ■■* 
MTT 242. Students work on advanced project completion using a variety of shop equipment in a systems approach. 



MUS 118 Music Appreciation 3 Credits 

An introductory course to music stressing the art of listening with discussions of prominent composers, their works, and their styles. No previous 
knowledge of music required. 3 class hours. 

NUR 150 Nursing and Universal Needs 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to program. Corequisites: NUR 151 - Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum. Provides fundamental facts, concepts, 
principles and rationales necessary to meet universal healthcare needs. Introduces the five components of the nursing process and the roles of the 
associate degree nurse. 



209 



NUR 151 Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to program. Corequisites: NUR 150 - Nursing and Universal Needs. Simulated and actual patient care situations provide 
an opportunity to develop interpersonal and psychomotor skills. Initiates a beginning level of assessing, analyzing, planning, implementing and 
evaluating therapeutic measures in meeting basic universal healthcare needs. Provides an opportunity in the laboratory and clinical setting to 
explore the role of the associate degree nurse. 

NUR 152 Nursing Related to Health Deviation I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 150 - Nursing and Universal Needs and NUR 151 - Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum. Corequisites: NUR 153 - 
Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum. Defines the role of the associate degree nurse in assisting clients experiencing health deviations 
related to nutrition/elimination, rest/activity, safety and homeostasis. The nursing process is utilized to promote, maintain and restore health or 
support death with dignity in the adult client. 

NUR 153 Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 150 - Nursing and Universal Needs and NUR 151 - Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum. Corequisites: NUR 152 - 
Nursing Related to Health Deviation I. Provides experience that enables the student to progress in the role of the associate degree nurse when 
providing care to adult clients experiencing health deviations. The nursing process guides the application of scientific facts, concepts, principles 
and rationales in the delivery of nursing care. Psychomotor skills and appropriate therapeutic communication are emphasized. 

NUR 154 Pharmacotherapeutics 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to program. Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of drug action, the classification of drugs and the 
appropriate nursing actions to achieve the desired outcomes of therapy. The nursing process as a framework for learning is integrated throughout 
the course. 

NUR 248 Transition to ASN Nursing 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to program, ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I, ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology D, ENG 111 - English 
Composition, MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra, PSY 101 - Introduction to Psychology, current Indiana LPN license, and official transcript from 
PN program. Examines the role of the associate degree nurse. Identifies components of the ASN program philosophy. Reviews the facts, concepts 
and principles underlying the nursing process. Laboratory and clinical experience is provided to review basic nursing skills and assist the student 
in identifying appropriate nursing responses to health deviation needs. 

NUR 250 Nursing Related to Health Deviation II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation Needs I and NUR 153 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation Needs I Practicum. 
Corequisites: NUR 251 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation II Practicum. Defines the role of the associate degree nurse in assisting clients 
experiencing health deviations related to oxygenation, social interaction/solitude and continued health deviations of safety and homeostasis. The 
nursing process with emphasis on planning, intervention and evaluation is utilized to promote, maintain and restore health or support death with 
dignity in the adult client. Leadership skills and advanced therapeutic communication are also emphasized. 

NUR 251 Nursing Related to Health Deviation H Practicum 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I and NUR 153 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum. Corequisites: 
NUR 250 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation n. Provides experiences that allow the student to further refine the role of the associate degree 
nurse in providing care to clients experiencing health deviations. The nursing process guides the application of scientific facts, concepts and prin- 
ciples in the delivery of nursing care. Leadership skills and advanced therapeutic communication are also applied. 

NUR 252 Nursing Related to Developmental Needs 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I and NUR 153 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum. Corequisites: 
NUR 253 - Nursing Related to Developmental Needs Practicum. Identifies the role of the associate degree nurse in assisting clients to meet their 
developmental needs which includes the maintenance of conditions to support life processes and maturation. Utilizes the nursing process with 
emphasis on planning, implementation and evaluation. It will be utilized to evaluate therapeutic measures that promote, maintain, and restore 
health or support death with dignity. 

NUR 253 Nursing Related to Developmental Needs Practicum 4 Credits. 

Prerequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I and NUR 153 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum. Corequisites: 
NUR 252 - Nursing Related to Developmental Needs. Provides experiences that allow the student to further refine the role of the associate degree 
nurse when providing care to the childbearing and childbearing family experiencing developmental needs which includes the maintenance of con- 
ditions to support life processes and maturation. The nursing process guides the application of scientific facts, concepts, principles and rationales 
in the delivery of nursing care. Decision making and appropriate therapeutic communication are also emphasized. 

NUR 254 Professional Nursing Issues 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of previous semester. Examines issues and nursing's responsibility to meet changing needs of persons in 
their environment. Historical aspects, current developments, future trends, improvement of nursing practice, legal/ethical considerations, and per- 
sonal/professional growth are integrated into the examination of the role of the associate degree nurse. 

NUR 260 Understanding Pathophysiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides basic and easy to understand information about pathophysiological mechanisms and manifestations of disease. 
Builds on the concepts mastered in anatomy and physiology and nursing theory courses. 

OAD 019 Keyboarding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the fundamentals of keyboarding using the touch method. Emphasizes mastery of the keyboard, 
development of formatting skills and development of speed and accuracy. 

210 



O AD 029 Speed and Accuracy Development 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: OAD 019 - Keyboarding. Designed to diagnose individual keyboarding speed and accuracy skills and bring those skills to an 
employable level. 

OAD 103 Word Processing Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Typing proficiency of 30 GWAM and basic formatting, or OAD advisor approval. Introduces the concepts of word processing sys- 
tems. Offers hands-on experience in the operation of a specific word processing software package. 

OAD 108 ShorthandVNotetaking I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. This course introduces basic principles of a note-taking system. Emphasis is placed on note-taking techniques, legibility, and 
mastery of the basic vocabulary. Dictation and transcription of material is included. 

OAD 110 Presentation Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or equivalent. Provides "hands-on" experience and familiarizes students with specific 
advanced design and layout techniques and practical applications of business presentations. 

OAD 114 Desktop Publishing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or equivalent. Emphasizes the production of publication-quality documents. Attention is 
given to design and layout principles and production techniques. Fonts, graphics and page composition are integrated into camera-ready docu- 
ments using computer software and hardware. 

OAD 116 Essentials of Business Correspondence 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing n. An intensive, competency-based business correspondence course that involves gram- 
mar, word usage, pronunciation, punctuation, proofreading, spelling, vocabulary building and other language skills that are essential to good 
workplace communication. 

OAD 119 Document Processing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Entry level proficiency of 35 gwpm and basic formatting. Emphasis is placed on increasing speed, improving accuracy, developing 
and applying formatting skills, applying communication and language arts skills and developing document production techniques. 



OAD 211 Medical Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HHS 101 - Medical Terminology and OAD 119 - Document Processing with an entry-level speed of 40 GWAM with a 5 error 
limit. Develops skills and knowledge of medical transcription utilizing medical reports, terminology and correspondence. 

OAD 214 Multimedia Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Continues the production of publication-quality documents. Attention is given to design 
and layout principles and production techniques. Color and editing graphics and photographs will be introduced. Students will also apply their 
design skills to preparing documents for electronic publishing on the World Wide Web. 

OAD 215 Legal Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 1 19 - Document Processing with an entry-level speed of 40 GWAM with a 5 error limit. Provides hands-on training in for- 
matting legal correspondence and court documents in the basic areas of law. Students will learn specialized rules of punctuation, terminology and 
standards for legal documents. In a laboratory setting students will leam how to use a transcribing machine to produce legal documents from tape 
dictation. 

OAD 216 Business Communications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEW 111 - English Composition, CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Emphasizes analysis of business communication 
environments — cultural, organizational, technological, international and interpersonal — and the use of communications standards to direct the 
choice of oral and written communication methods and techniques. It includes practice in writing a variety of messages used to communicate in 
business and industry with an emphasis on the potential impact of the message on the receiver as a basis for planning and delivering effective 
business communications. 

OAD 217 Problem Solving for Computer Users 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Introduces the organization, structure and functions necessary for managing and main- 
taining information systems within a business organization. Presents the student with basic computer system concepts such as file and resource 
management, device drivers, file structures, hard disk organization, software installation, upgrading and maintenance and fundamental data secu- 
rity techniques. These concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 



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OAD 121 Office Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Prepares the student to understand and carry out responsibilities assigned in a business 
office. Topics include telephone techniques, office equipment, travel and conference arrangements, professional development, research tech- 
niques, time and stress management and business ethics. 

OAD 207 Integrated Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or equivalent experience. Explores the advanced features of an integrated office software 
package using word processing, spreadsheets, databases and presentation graphics. 



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OAD 218 Spreadsheets 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Provides an in-depth understanding of worksheet design, charting, what-if analysis, 
worksheet database creation and manipulation and OLE. Knowledge and use of a spreadsheet will be applied to various business applications. 
Integration of spreadsheets in other applications will be addressed. 

OAD 219 Advanced Document Processing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Entry level proficiency of 45 wpm and formatting. Emphasis is on a high degree of competence in an office-like environment pro- 
cessing documents on a personal computer using an up-to-date software package. 

OAD 220 Records and Database Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Focuses on the management and control of documents from creation to disposition 
using manual, automated, and electronic media. Examines filing procedures, records management personnel, and equipment. Uses database soft- 
ware to create, modify, query, and report information from a database. 

OAD 221 Office Administration and Supervision 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 216 - Business Communications. Completion of minimum of 45 credits toward degree. Emphasizes management of office 
functions. Key topics include personnel, team building, ergonomics, project management and leadership styles. Case studies and role playing 
projects are included. Students will also complete the program outcomes assessment tool. 

OAD 226 Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 218 - Spreadsheets. Continues the study of electronic spreadsheets in business. Emphasizes the advanced application of elec- 
tronic spreadsheets. 

OAD 280 Co-op/Internship/Externship/Practicum 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 216 - Business Communications. Completion of minim um of 45 program credits toward degree or advisor approval. Students 
gain on-the-job experience while earning college credits towards an associate degree. 

OAD 281-294 Special Topics in Office Administration 1-3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of 
interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

PHL 071 Critical Thinking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or 
demonstrated competency on the writing section (ASSET 41+, COMPASS 70-100) and the reading section (ASSET 41+, COMPASS 80-100) of 
the assessment. Assists students in developing critical thinking strategies with academic and workplace applications. 

PHL 101 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition. Examines fundamental questions of philosophy such as the foundations of morality, skepticism 
and knowledge, the nature of mind, free will and determinism, and the existence of God. Emphasizes the evaluation of arguments and analysis of 
concepts. 

PHL 102 Introduction to Ethics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 1 1 1 - English Composition. Examines major theories of ethics, theoretical issues, moral problems and issues and our respon- 
sibility to future generations. 

PHO 106 Studio Practices 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces studio work in black and white photography using continuous light sources. Covers basic set-up techniques and 
lighting methods for a variety of subject matter. Includes practice with photo flood lamps and quartz lamps, both floods and spot and a variety of 
equipment used to modify light. 

PHY 100 Technical Physics 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Pre or Corequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry-Trigonometry or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. 
Introduces the concepts and applications of physics. Leads students to develop an integrated understanding of the theory and applications of 
measuring (or unit) systems, scalars, vectors, force, work, rates, energy, momentum, power, force transformers (simple machines), vibrations and 
waves, and time constants. Emphasizes understanding concepts, factual knowledge, computation and application. 

PNU 114 Nursing Issues and Trends 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Admission to the PN program. Focuses on nursing history, ethical and legal issues. Examines the organizational patterns and roles 
of the practical nurse in the health care delivery system. Emphasizes life-long learning. 

PNU 121 Introduction to Nursing I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the PN program. Corequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science. 
Introduces the role of the practical nurse as a member of the health care team. The nursing process is the basis for providing care within the well- 
ness/illness continuum. Focuses on the application of basic nursing skills essential in meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual 
needs of individuals in preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitative environments. 

PNU 122 Introduction to Nursing II 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: PNU 121 - Introduction to Nursing I. Focuses on the progression of learning nursing skills. Emphasizes application of safe nursing 
practice in the clinical setting. Introduces drug administration, dosage calculations and mental health concepts. 

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PNU 123 Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the PN program; approval of program chair. Studies pharmacological agents, including classifications, actions, side 
effects, interactions and nursing implications. 

PNU 126 Integrated Life Science 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ASSET and/or basic skills. Approval of program chair. Examines physical/chemical factors that enable 
man to maintain homeostasis of the internal environment. Emphasizes anatomy and physiology. Integrates concepts of chemistry, nutrition and 
microbiology. 

PNU 127 Care of the Adult I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing II and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science. Focuses 
on the application of the nursing process in understanding the pathophysiology and nursing care of clients with circulatory, ventilation and immu- 
nity dysfunctions. Emphasizes meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs in selected environments. Theory is applied in clini- 
cal component. 

PNU 128 Care of the Adult II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing D and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology n or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science. Focuses 
on the application of the nursing process in understanding the pathophysiology and nursing care of clients with nutrition, elimination, reproduc- 
tion and hormone dysfunctions. Emphasis will be on meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs in selected environments. 
Theory is applied in clinical component. 

PNU 129 Care of the Adult III 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing II and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science. Focuses 
on the application of the nursing process in understanding the pathophysiology and nursing care of clients with mobility, neurological, sensory 
and dermatological dysfunctions. Emphasis will be on meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs in selected environments. 
Theory is applied in clinical component. 

PNU 130 Nursing Care of the Older Adult 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology n or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science, and PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing n. Focuses 
on the application of the nursing process in meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs of older clients in selected environ- 
ments. Preventive, therapeutic, rehabilitative care, and in support of death with dignity are major components. Theory is applied in the clinical 
setting. 

PNU 131 Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology n or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science, and PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing n. Emphasis 
is on the normal reproductive cycle and normal growth and development of the child within the wellness/illness continuum. Examines conditions 
and selected interventions based on the nursing process, in providing preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitative care for the mother and child. The 
role of the practical nurse is identified in providing holistic care to the childbearing family within the clinical setting. 

POL 101 Introduction to American Government and Politics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demon- 
strated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COM- 
PASS Reading, 80-100). Introduces the foundations, nature and dynamics of American government and politics including constitutional founda- 
tions, civil liberties and civil rights, federalism, political parties, public opinion, interest groups, media, nominations, campaigns, elections, the 
presidency, the judiciary, congress, bureaucracies and public policy. 

PST 120 First Responder 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information necessary to recognize emergency situations, know the proper course of action with dif- 
ferent types of emergencies and apply appropriate first aid. Addresses handling of victims of hazardous materials accidents. Covers CPR, includ- 
ing one and two rescuer, and adult, infant and child resuscitation. 

PST 121 Risk Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces occupational safety and health standards and codes with emphasis on applications of codes to typical work situa- 
tions and MSDS requirements. Includes emergency first aid, safety protection, eye protection and chemicals handling. Covers employer and 
employee rights as well as violations, citations, penalties, variances, appeals and record keeping. 

PST 220 Incident Management Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Emphasizes the command and control of major department operations at an advanced level, linking operations 
and safety. Areas of study include incident management systems, pre-incident, size-up, command systems, sectoring functions, staging, safety 
officer, command post, communications, news media and computer aided resources. Utilizes simulated incidents requiring the applications of 
appropriate solutions. 

PST 221 Computer Design and Planning 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 104 - Computer Fundamentals for Technology. Focuses on the needs and uses of the computer in public safety. Includes com- 
puter aided dispatch, advanced levels of cameo, I-Chiefs, computer-aided design of equipment, generation of incident reports, application of com- 
puters for the budgetary process, computer-aided resource and materials, maintenance, test records of vehicles and the GIS program. 



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PST 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minim um of 30 credits toward their degrees with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. 
Gives students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while 
earning credit toward an associate degree. 

PST 281-294 Special Topics in Public Safety 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of inter- 
est that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

RAD 101 Orientation and Nursing in X-Ray Technology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program through appropriate assessment or successful completion of college entry courses. Covers seven units. 
Introduces radiology and prepares students for entry into a clinical setting. 

RAD 102 Principles of Radiographic Exposures I 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 107 - Radiation Physics. Presents individual and group characteristics needed to produce the ideal radiograph. Includes 
knowledge of interchangeabihty of roAs, kVp, film/screen combinations, distance and grids. Covers factors and considerations needed for pedi- 
atric techniques, calibration, heat unit calculation and technique chart construction. 

RAD 103 Radiographic Positioning I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Acceptance into program through appropriate assessment or successful completion of pre-college courses, CIS 101 - Introduction to 
Microcomputers and any other previous radiography courses. Correlates positioning, terminology, techniques and film critique with the examina- 
tions of chest, abdomen, upper extremity, upper/lower GI tracts and urinary tract. 

RAD 104 X-Ray Clinical Education I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment with RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, completion of CIS 101 and other applicable courses. Follows 
category 2 of the competency lab model, which tests proficiency of skills from categories 1 and 2. Includes supervised clinical experience. 

RAD 105 Radiographic Positioning II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, RAD 104 - X-Ray Clinical Education I and any other previous 
radiology course. Correlates all previous material related to anatomy and positioning, covers the areas of lower extremities, spine and thorax and 
advances knowledge in ethics and quality assurance. 

RAD 106 X-Ray Clinical Education II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, RAD 104 - X-Ray Clinical Education I, Concurrent with RAD 105 - Radiographic 
Positioning II and all previous required radiology courses. Includes supervised clinical experience, utilizes Category 2 of the competency model 
and tests proficiency of skills from Categories 1 and 2. 

RAD 107 Radiation Physics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Introduces physics as utilized in the production of X-rays. Includes laws of physics pertaining to 
atomic structure, chemical properties and reactions and electrical circuitry. Covers equipment and methods of generation and measurement of 
electricity. 

RAD 109 Imaging Techniques 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successfiil completion of any other previous radiology courses. Covers theories, principles and demonstrations of current imaging 
modalities. 

RAD 201 Radiographic Positioning HI 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, RAD 105 - Radiographic Positioning II, and all other previous radiology courses. This 
course correlates positioning terminology and techniques, film critique, with exams of Category 2 of the competency models and testing skills 
from Category 1 and 2. 

RAD 202 X-Ray Clinical Education D3 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, RAD 105 - Radiographic Positioning II, RAD 106 - X-Ray Clinical Education n, 
Concurrent with RAD 201 - Radiographic Positioning HI, and all other previous program courses. Introduces Category 3 of the Competency 
Model, proficiency testing over Categories 1 and 2 and testing over Category 3. 

RAD 203 X-Ray Clinical Education IV 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 202 - X-Ray Clinical Education m, RAD 201 - Radiographic Positioning m, RAD 106 - X-Ray Clinical Education n, RAD 
105 -Radiographic Positioning n, RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, and concurrent with RAD 209 - Radiographic Positioning TV. 
Introduces Category 4 of the Competency Model in lab proficiency testing of skills from Categories 1, 2, 3 and proficiency in Category 4. 

RAD 204 X-Ray Clinical Education V 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 203 - X-Ray Clinical Education IV, RAD 201 - Radiographic Positioning HI, RAD 106 - X-Ray Clinical Education n, RAD 
105 - Radiographic Positioning II and RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I. Includes final competency testing for students who have not com- 
pleted clinicals 1-4. Continues maintenance over all categories. Includes clinical experience. 

RAD 205 Pathology for Radiologic Technology 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of previous radiology courses. Examines basic concepts concerning disease, its causes and the resulting 
changes as viewed radiographically. Emphasizes needed technical changes to produce optimal radiographs from correlations to patient symptoms. 

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RAD 206 Radiobiology and Radiation Protection 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of previous radiology courses. Covers theories and principles of the effects of ionizing radiation upon living 
tissues. Includes dosages, measurements, DNA structure and function and cellular radio sensitivity. 

RAD 208 Principles of Radiographic Exposures II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 102 - Principles of Radiographic Exposures I. Continues RAD 102 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure I. Explains photo 
timing and its relationship to manual techniques. Associates kVp and mAs with the quality and quantity of radiation. Covers standard darkroom 
procedure, automatic processing and quality assurance. 

RAD 209 Radiographic Positioning IV 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 201 - Radiographic Positioning HI and all other previous radiology courses. Covers all positions involving radiographic exam- 
inations. 

RAD 299 Genera] Examination Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews content of program, emphasizing anatomy, physics, exposure principles, positioning and radiation safety. Simulated 
exams prepare the student for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist Examination. 

RES 121 Introduction to Respiratory Care 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair approval; demonstrated competency in reading, writing, computation and basic science skills through appropriate 
assessment or successful completion of BSA program coursework. Corequisites: RES 122 - Therapeutic Modalities. Presents an introduction to 
respiratory care including a brief history of the profession; equipment cleaning and sterilization techniques; patient assessment techniques and iso- 
lation techniques. Includes medical records documentation, gas analyzers, introduction and application of therapeutic modalities including oxygen 
therapy, aerosol and humidity therapy, airway maintenance, hyperinflation therapy and an overview of ethical practice and safety. 

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RES 122 Therapeutic Modalities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair approval; demonstrated competency in reading, writing, computation and basic science skills through appropriate 
assessment or successful completion of BSA program coursework. Presents medicinal aerosol therapy and respiratory pharmacology; hyperinfla- 
tion therapies; introduction to pulmonary rehabilitation and home care. Introduces basic bedside pulmonary function testing and development of 
respiratory care plans. Presents selected aspects of ethical and legal respiratory practice. 

RES 123 Cardiopulmonary Physiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Corequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology H Presents the cardiopulmonary system 
including ventilation, perfusion and gas exchange; introduces interpretation and application of arterial blood gases, acid-base regulation and physi- 
ologic monitoring. 

RES 124 Clinical Practicum I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPR Certification - Course C AHA, Health Care Provider (HCP) Level. Corequisites: RES 121 - Introduction to Respiratory Care. 
Introduces the student to the hospital environment. Exposes the student to various hospitals and respiratory care departments, patient charts, 
patient identification and communication within the hospital. Provides supervised experience in oxygen therapy, hyperinflation therapy, 
humidity/aerosol therapy and charting. 

RES 125 Critical Care I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 122 - Therapeutic Modalities. Introduction to the respiratory care of the critically ill patient. Presents arterial blood gas collec- 
tion; analysis and interpretation; and basic medical laboratory data. Introduces concepts and techniques of critical respiratory care of adults and 
pediatrics; includes establishment and maintenance of artificial airways, application of adult and pediatric mechanical ventilators and related car- 
dio-pulmonary monitoring equipment. 

RES 126 Clinical Medicine I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 123 - Cardiopulmonary Physiology. Introduces etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics and prognosis of selected 

pulmonary diseases. P^P- 

RES 127 Clinical Practicum II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 121 - Introduction to Respiratory Care, CPR - Certification Course C and RES 124 - Clinical Practicum I. Provides supervised 

experience in selected therapeutic modalities. Includes an introduction to chest physiotherapy, medicinal aerosol therapy, intermittent positive 

pressure breathing and ultrasonic therapy. Requires continuing certification in CPR. t > 

RES 128 Clinical Practicum D3 9 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 125 - Critical Care L CPR Certification - HCP Level, RES 126 - Clinical Medicine I, RES 127 - Clinical Practicum n. — 

Provides additional supervised experience in selected therapeutic modalities. Includes advanced patient assessment, arterial blood gas analysis and ■** 
airway care. Provides clinical experience in adult critical care with mechanical ventilation. Includes an introduction to basic cardiopulmonary test- 
ing. Requires continued Certification in CPR. 

RES 221 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 125 - Critical Care I and RES 126 - Clinical Medicine I. Presents in-depth approaches to the respiratory care management of 
critically ill neonatal, pediatric and adult patients. Emphasizes techniques of patient evaluation, cardiopulmonary monitoring, transportation and 
management. Includes advanced techniques of patient assessment through pulmonary function testing and other selected assessment techniques. 



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RES 222 Critical Care n 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 125 - Critical Care I and RES 126 - Clinical Medicine I. Presents advanced techniques of mechanical ventilation of neonatal, 
pediatric and adult patients; includes fetal development and assessment; neonatal and pediatric assessment, equipment, procedures and therapeu- 
tic techniques; and introduces related aspects of the NICU environment. 

RES 223 Respiratory Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II. Discusses the most common pharmacological 
agents currently being administered to all body systems. Emphasizes classifications, indications, side effects, dosages and routes of administra- 
tion. Discusses emergency drugs, antibacterial medication, antifungal medications, and the implications and complications of IV therapy. 

RES 224 Clinical Medicine II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 221 - Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics. Presents etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics and prognosis of disease con- 
ditions related to respiratory care; focuses on the interrelation of all physiologic systems. Emphasizes treatment protocols and includes prepara- 
tion for clinical simulation component of national credentialing examination. 

RES 226 Continuing Care 2 Credits 

Corequisites: RES 227 - Clinical Practicum IV. Presents a brief history of home care patients in relation to respiratory care modalities. Provides 
an overview of respiratory care roles in the alternative care sites. 

RES 227 Clinical Practicum IV 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPR Certification - Course C and RES 128 - Clinical Practicum HI. Provides additional supervised experience in selected therapeu- 
tic modalities. Includes advanced cardiopulmonary diagnostic techniques, application of invasive and non-invasive monitoring of the cardiopul- 
monary system and experience in respiratory care, departmental management and quality assurance roles. Includes advanced clinical experience 
in adult, pediatric and neonatal critical care. Requires continuing certification in CPR. 

RES 229 Emergency Management 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPR Certification - HPC Level. Applies advanced cardiopulmonary life support efforts in an emergency setting. 

SCI 111 Physical Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and 
COMPASS Reading, 80-100) and MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Introduces physical concepts and theories pertaining to current applications and 
trends in physics, chemistry, earth science and astronomy. Emphasizes concepts and factual knowledge. 

SCL 101 Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory 1 Credit 

Corequisite: SCM 101. Experiments to illustrate properties and reactions of organic and biochemical groups. 3 laboratory hours. 

SCM 101 Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: High school chemistry or satisfactory completion of SIC 101 or SIC 102. Corequisite: CSIC 101. Introduction to nomenclature, 
reactions and descriptions of organic and biochemical groups. 3 lecture hours. 

SCM 111 Chemistry I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in writing, reading, and computation through appropriate assessment or successful completion of ITSC 
ENG 025 Introduction to College Writing n, ITSC ENG 032 Reading Strategies for College II; and ITSC MAT 1 1 1 Intermediate Algebra. An 
introductory course that includes the science of chemistry and measurement, atomic theory and the periodic table, chemical bonding, stoichiome- 
try, liquids and solids, gases and the ideal gas law, solutions, and acids and bases. Available only through the Community College of Indiana. 3 
lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SCM 112 Chemistry n 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: ITSC CHM 101 Chemistry I, or SCM 111 or other equivalent preparation. Further explores concepts of equilibrium. Includes 
chemistry of metals and nonmetals, environmental chemistry, nuclear chemistry, organic and biochemistry. Available only through the 
Community College of Indiana. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SES 100 Earth Science 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must qualify for ENG 032, MAT 011, and HEW 101. Introduction to fields of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and 
astronomy. Designed especially for non-science majors. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SES 207 World Geography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must qualify for HEW 101 and MAT 012. Application of geographic principles to interpretation of human activities in all 
major world regions. Emphasis on cultural, economic and political aspects of major nations. 3 lecture hours. 

SIC 101 Introductory Chemistry I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in writing, reading, and computation through appropriate assessment or successful completion of ITSC 
ENG 025 Introduction to College Writing n, ITSC ENG 032 Reading Strategies for College H, and ITSC MAT 1 1 1 Intermediate Algebra. An 
introductory course that includes the science of chemistry and measurement, atomic theory and the periodic table, chemical bonding, equation 
writing and balancing, stoichiometry, and gases. (TVY Tech State College CHM 101) Available only through the Community College of 
Indiana. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 



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SIC 102 Introductory Chemistry II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ITSC CHM 101 Chemistry I or SCM 111. Includes liquids and solids, solutions and solution concentrations, acids and bases, equi- 
librium, nuclear chemistry, and organic and biochemistry. (TVY Tech State College CHM 102) Available only through the Community College 
of Indiana. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SIL 102 Introductory Biology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in writing, reading, and computation through appropriate assessment or successful completion of ENG 
025 Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 Reading Strategies for College n, and MAT 044 Mathematics. Introduces the basic con- 
cepts of life. Includes discussion of cellular and organismal biology, genetics, evolution, ecology, and interaction among all living organisms. 
Addresses applications of biology to society. (TVY Tech State College BIO 101) Available only through the Community College of Indiana. 3 
lecture hours, 1 laboratory hour. 

SIL 211 Biology of Microorganisms I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in writing, reading, and computation through appropriate assessment or successful completion of ITSC 
ENG 025 Introduction to College Writing n, ITSC ENG 032 Reading Strategies for College II, and ITSC MAT 044 Mathematics. Presents an 
overview of microbiology that includes fundamentals, methods, and materials. Introduces industrial and clinical microbiology. (TVY Tech State 
College BIO 211) Available only through the Community College of Indiana. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SIL 212 Biology of Microorganisms II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: SIL 21 1 or ITSC BIO 211 General microbiology and ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I. Presents a secondary study of bacteria, 
viruses, fungi, rickettsia, and parasites. Emphasizes the study of bacterial growth and control demonstrated by serological techniques. (TVY Tech 
State College BIO 212) Available only through the Community College of Indiana. 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours. 

SIP 101 Physics I 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 104 or consent of the instructor. An algebra/trig based physics course that introduces the basic concepts of mechanics, includ- 
ing force and torque, linear and rotational motion, work, energy and power, simple machines, fluids, and heat. (TVY Tech State College PHY 
101) Available only through the Community College of Indiana. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SIP 102 Physics H 4 Credits , 

Prerequisite: MAT 104 or consent of the instructor. An algebra/trig based physics course that introduces the basic concepts of light, periodic 
motion and wave motion, electricity and magnetism, modem physics, along with current topics in physics. (IVY Tech State College PHY 102) 
Available only through the Community College of Indiana. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

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SLS 202 Biology of Microorganisms 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in writing, reading, and computation through appropriate assessment or ITSC ENG 025 Introduction to 
College Writing n, ITSC ENG 032 Reading Strategies for College II; and ITSC MAT 044 Mathematics. Presents an overview of microbiology 
but emphasizes clinically related areas of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic involvement. Emphasizes fundamentals, methods, materials, bacte- 
rial growth and control, ecology, industrial uses, and biotechnology. (TVY Tech State College BIO 201) Available only through the Community 
College of Indiana. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SLS 203 Microbiology for the Health Professions II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: SLS 202 or ITSC BIO 211 General Microbiology and ITSC ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I. Presents a secondary study of 
bacteria, viruses, fungi, rickettsia, and parasites. Emphasizes the study of bacterial growth and control demonstrated by serological techniques. 
(IVY Tech State College BIO 212) Available only through the Community College of Indiana. 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours. ,,, 

SMA 115 Survey of Calculus I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 1 02 or 1 1 1 with a C or better grade, or two years of high school algebra with recentered SAT Math score of (R)570 or greater. ^jjjjj 
Not open to those with credit in MATH 118; does not substitute for MATH 118. For students in business, social science or pre-professional pro- 
grams. Introduction to derivative, integrals and their application. 3 lecture hours. 

: 

SPS 101 Physical Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 012, or equivalent placement, and all remedial English. Introduction to physical concepts and theories pertaining to current 
applications and trends which may be selected from areas of physics, chemistry, earth science, and astronomy. Emphasizes concepts and factual 
knowledge. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SPT 101 Technical Physics 4 Credits 

Corequisite: MAT 107 or MAT 101 or equivalent. An introductory course designed for technology majors. The course covers measurement, 

motion, force, work, energy, power, simple machines, torques, properties of materials, fluids, hydraulics, sound, heat, and electricity. (IVY Tech mt m 

State College PHY 100) Available through the Community College of Indiana. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours. 

SUR 111 Fundamentals of Surgical Technology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to clinical phase of Surgical program. Corequisites: SUR 1 12 - Application of Surgical Fundamentals. Introduces princi- s - » 

pies of sterile techniques and the operative care of the surgical patient. Includes the roles of scrubbing and circulating duties. 

SUR 112 Application of Surgical Fundamentals 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to clinical phase of Surgical program. Corequisites: SUR 111 - Fundamentals of Surgical Technology. Demonstrates the 
application of surgical fundamentals. Correlates theory to practice by requiring students to participate as members of a surgical team in laboratory 
simulations. 



217 



SUR 113 Surgical Procedures I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 111 -Fundamentals of Surgical Technology, SUR 112 - Application of Surgical Fundamentals. Corequisites: SUR 114- 
Clinical Applications I. Introduces general surgical procedures with review of perioperative patient care including diagnostic testing, pre-opera- 
tive care and immediate post-operative care. 

SUR 114 Clinical Applications I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 111 - Fundamentals of Surgical Technology, SUR 112 - Application of Surgical Fundamentals. Corequisites: SUR 113 - 
Surgical Procedures I. Correlates the principles and theories of basic surgical procedures to clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. Includes 
knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for successful implementation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

SUR 211 Surgical Procedures II 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 113 - Surgical Procedures I, SUR 114 - Clinical Applications I. Corequisites: SUR 212 - Clinical Applications n. Studies 
advanced surgical procedures in relation to the physiological aspects of surgical intervention including those procedures related to the special 
senses, genitourinary, musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Includes a knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing pathology, surgical hazards 
encountered, the surgical procedure and a review of perioperative patient care. 

SUR 212 Clinical Applications II 9 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 113 - Surgical Procedures I, SUR 114 - Clinical Applications I. Corequisites: SUR 211 - Surgical Procedures n. Correlates the 
basic principles and theories of advanced surgical procedures to clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. Includes knowledge, skills and atti- 
tudes necessary for successful implementation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

SUR 213 Surgical Procedures III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 211 Surgical Procedures n, SUR 212 Clinical Applications n. Corequisites: SUR 214 - Clinical Applications HI. Studies spe- 
cialized surgical procedures including those related to the cardiothoracic and vascular systems. Includes a knowledge of the involved anatomy, 
existing pathology, surgical hazards encountered, the surgical procedure and a review of perioperative patient care. 

SUR 214 Clinical Applications III 8 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 211 - Surgical Procedures II, SUR 212 - Clinical Applications II. Corequisites: SUR 213 - Surgical Procedures in. Correlates 
principles and theories of specialized surgical procedures to the clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. Includes the knowledge, skills and 
attitudes necessary for successful implementation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

VIS 101 Fundamentals of Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Investigates design theory and color dynamics as applied to organizing the visual field. Provides experiences in applying 
design theory. 

VIS 102 Fundamentals of Imaging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 115 - Computer Graphics and VIS 101 - Fundamentals of Design. Introduces students to a full range of image input technology 
including conventional 35mm photography, still video capture, video camcorder and computer scanners. 

VIS 103 Introduction to Multi-Media 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advanced standing with Advisor approval. Explores various software programs involved in creating multi-media presentations, dig- 
ital movies, digital animation and analog video output. 

VIS 105 Video and Sound 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a comprehensive survey course in video production including an introduction to planning, shooting and editing 
video projects. 

VIS 115 Computer Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces students to the computer's use in graphic design. Focuses on basic computer terminology and use, mastering fun- 
damental skills and developing efficient working styles. Develops skills by creating publications with page layout software. 

VIS 201 Electronic Imaging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 115 - Computer Graphics. Examines the area of still video photography and various electronic darkroom software packages. 
Provides experience with the electronic darkroom environment including editing processes, manipulation of images in black and white and color, 
and working with various output devices. Discusses four-color separations and pre-press procedures. 

VIS 202 Color Prepress 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 201 - Electronic Imaging. Examines the technical specifications, translation issues, various output options and troubleshooting 
of graphic files for high end printing processes. Studies and compares the roles of electronic production artists, of service bureaus and of printing 
technologies. 

VIS 205 Business Practices for Visual Artists 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ART 217 - Advanced Graphic Design. Examines legal and business issues affecting the professional visual artist. Examines copy- 
right and "work for hire", marketing and self-promotion, estimating and pricing, insurance and liability, and the computer's role in managing a 
business. 

VIS 206 Interdisciplinary Studies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Offers students opportunities to complete selected projects while working in a team environment with students of other disci- 
plines. Simulates situations found in industry. 



218 



VIS 207 Portfolio Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: All Communications courses. Corequisites: All required program courses. Focuses on student's final preparation for the job inter- 
view. Finalizes project work demonstrating acquired knowledge and skills, along with resume and cover letter, for presentation to prospective 
employers. Provides students with the opportunity to use one credit for field study. 

VIS 208 Portfolio Preparation II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 207 - Portfolio Preparation. Provides the opportunity to design a portfolio that focuses on a second specialty area (or additional 
or updated skill area). Project work is finalized for presentation to prospective employers or industry review. (Restricts work to student specialty 
area or new skill area and must be portfolio quality.) Allows student to integrate skills between specialties for a revised, extended or additional 
portfolio. 

VIS 209 3D Rendering and Animation 3 Credits g»| 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the virtual world of 3D and how it can be applied as an illustration and animation element in multimedia. Students 
will explore navigation, modeling, rendering, animation, and camera and lighting techniques. 

VIS 281-294 Special Topics in Visual Communications Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of inter- 
est that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area (Contact chief academic officer for more information). 

WLD 108 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with knowledge of shielded metal arc welding operations and equipment. Provides extensive practice time 
to produce the skills to make satisfactory welds with this process. Emphasizes safety hazards and safety practices in arc welding. 

WLD 109 Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Offers basic instruction in oxy-acetylene welding with emphasis on welding techniques in flat, horizontal, vertical and over- 
head positions. Includes brazing and flame cutting. Focuses on safety hazards and safe practices in oxy-acetylene welding and cutting. 

WLD 110 Welding Fabrication I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 108 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding I, WLD 109 - Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting, WLD 207 - Gas Metal Arc 
(MIG) Welding. Provides opportunities for practice in hands-on fabrication of welded products. Includes basic equipment used in fabrication. 

WLD 120 Metallurgy Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies properties and uses of ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys, production of iron and steeL composition and prop- 
erties of plain carbon steel and alloying elements, selection of tools, case hardening and destructive and nondestructive testing. Includes funda- 
mentals of heat treatment and reactions occurring in metals subjected to various heat treatment methods and techniques. 



WLD 203 Pipe Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 108 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding I, WLD 206 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding n. Provides for extensive practice in the 
preparation and welding of pipe in the 2G and 5G position. Includes preparation, methods of welding, electrodes and filler wires. 

WLD 206 Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 108 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding I. Covers SMAW welding equipment and products used to produce groove type butt 
welds. Provides extensive practice to develop the skills to achieve satisfactory welds of this type. Safety hazards and safe practices in arc welding 
are emphasized. 

WLD 207 Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Considers various gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes including microwire, flux-core, innershield and submerged arc 
with emphasis on metal inert gas welding. Includes techniques of welding in all positions on various thicknesses of metal. 

WLD 208 Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 109 - Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting. Provides students with thorough knowledge of the gas tungsten arc welding 
process. Includes detailed study of the techniques of making welds in all positions using the GTAW applications. Lectures and discussions pro- 
vide additional background information essential to a qualified GTAW welder. 

WLD 209 Welding Certification 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program chair approval. Prepares the student for certification in shielded arc, TIG and MIG welding through study of the qualifica- 
tions, procedures and equipment standards. Includes a survey of qualifying agencies, associations and societies. 

WLD 210 Welding Fabrication II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 110 - Welding Fabrication I. Provides for practice in hands-on fabrication and the use of related equipment. 



w 



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219 



Program Chairs 



Business and General Education Division 

General Education NMC 224 

921-4924 

921-4919 

mivery@ivytech.edu 

Accounting NMC 221 
Harry Gray 
921-4446 
hgray@ivytech. edu 

Anatomy & Physiology TC T333 
Dr. Bonnie Tarricone 
921-4567 
brarrico@ivytech.edu 

Business NMC 270 
Frank Moman 
921-4396 
fmoman@ivytech. edu 

English NMC 229D 
Carol Schuck 
921-4844 
cschuck@indian.vinu.edu 

General Technical Studies 
NMC 221A 
Jane Dalzell 
921-4508 
jdalzell@ivytech.edu 

GTS Studies Retention Specialist 
Doris McDougal NMC 22 IB 
921-4506 
dmcdouga@ivytech. edu 

Hospitality Adm. NMC 420B 

JeffBricker 

921-4516 

jbricker@ivytech.edu 



Math NMC 236D 
Melinda Fox 
921-4620 
mfox@ivytech.edu 

Office Administration NMC 566 
Debra Leverette 
921-4914 
dleveret@ivytech. edu 

Paralegal NMC 575 
Krista Hollenberg, J.D. 
921-4973 
khollenb@ivytech. edu 

Susan Airman NMC 574 

921-4443 

saltman@ivytech.edu 

Science TC T3 15 
Lucia Rusu 
921-4503 
lrusu@indian.vinu. edu 

Social Science NMC 23 IB 
Dr. Sirnin Shirzadi 
921-4501 
sshirzadi@indian.vinu.edu 

VU Liberal Arts NMC 406 
Jim Hoffman 
921-4670 
jchoffman@indian.vinu.edu 

Health and Public Services Divsion 

NMC 501 
Denise Gladney 
921-4450 
dgladney@ivytech. edu 



220 



Associate of Science Nursing, Roosevelt R27 4B 

Jan Kramer 

917-5903 

jkramer@ivytech.edu 

Pre-clinical students 
NMC509 
Pete Magnant 
921-4430 
pmagnant@ivytech. edu 

Criminal Justice NMC 517 
Willie Whitfield 
921-4427 
wwhitfie@ivytech.edu 

Early Childhood Education NMC 505 

Janet Imel 

921-4303 

jimel@ivytech.edu 

Human Services NMC 519 
Terri Jablonski-Polk 
921-4426 
tpolk@ivytech.edu 

Medical Assistant NMC 510 
Lori Andrews 
921-4589 
landrews@ivytech.edu 

Practical Nursing, Roosevelt R27 4A 

Barb Deady 

921-4407 

bdeady@ivytech.edu 

Pre-clinical students NMC 509 
Pete Magnant 
921-4430 
pmagnant@ivytech.edu 

Public Safety, Public Safety Technology Center 

Larry Hoskins 

546-4542 

lhoskins@ivytech.edu 



Radiologic Technology NMC 514 

Ann Sisel 

921-4438 

asisel@ivytech.edu 

Respiratory Care, Wheeler 
Marcus Stowe 
921-4410 
mstowe@ivytech.edu 

Surgical Technology NMC 504 
Wanda Haver 
921-4404 
whaver@ivytech.edu 

Pre-clinical students NMC 509 
Pete Magnant 
921-4430 
pmagnant@ivytech. edu 

Health Career Certificate Courses [Nurse Aide 

(CNA) and Qualified Medication Aide(QMA)] 

Lana Anderson NMC 502 

921-4561 

ljansers@ivytech.edu 

Technology Division 

T311 

Mary Powell 

921-4579 

mpowell@i vytech. edu 

Automotive Technology ATC A 134 

Ron Finney 

269-9273 

rfinney@ivytech.edu 

Computer Info Systems NMC 271 
Marvin Daugherty 
921-4758 
mdaugher@ivytech.edu 



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221 



Networking TCT3 16 
Mike Hall 
921-4576 
mhall@ivytech. edu 

Programming NMC 269 
Bernadette Cinkoske 
921-4764 
bcinkosk@ivytech.edu 

Design Technology TC T325 
Tom Trusty 
921-4534 
ttrusty@ivytech. edu 

Electronics TC T328 
Dave Miller 
921-4548 
dmiller@ivytech. edu 

Industrial Technology TC T330 
Bill Flanigan 
921-4553 
bflaniga@ivytech. edu 

HVAC TC T329C 
Mike Wallace 
921-4541 
mwallace@ivytech.edu 

Industrial Maint. TC T327 
Lee Sensenbrenner 
921-4545 
osensenb@ivytech.edu 

Machine Tool Technology TC T332 
Lowell Dragoo 
921-4464 
ldragoo@ivytech. edu 



222 



Technology Division Mission 

It is the mission of the Division of Technology and Visual Communications to provide broad, practical 
training for those seeking employment and advancement in technical occupations, to emphasize the 
ability to think and plan in the job setting, to plan initial laboratory experiences that develop skills in 
the use of modern industrial equipment and measuring instruments. Through classroom and laboratory 
work, training in industrial applications of theory, analysis, design, and construction techniques is 
emphasized. Each program provides opportunities for the student to advance from basic skills to profi- 
ciency on a high technological level. The Division engages in career education for individuals seeking 
employment, or who are currently employed in technical-related fields, leading to the associate on 
applied science or associate in science degree. Further, the Division offers courses to students who are 
not degree seeking but who desire post-secondary education of a specialized nature. 

General education is a major emphasis of each program. It is the goal that all students achieve a level 
of proficiency both academically and technically that enables them to continue life-long learning skills. 

The Division has implemented a secondary/post-secondary education link that promote articulation in 
an effort to attract high school students into a technical education pathway that will lead to an associate 
degree, a baccalaureate degree, and even a graduate degree. 

Consistent with the definition of Industrial Technology, technology programs within the Technology 
and Visual Communications Division prepares technical professionals for employment in the local 
business, industrial, and government organizations. 

These programs are characterized by: 

1) The application of theories, concepts, and principles found in language arts, humanities and the 
social and behavioral sciences. 

2) A strong foundation of the theories, principles, and concepts required in mathematics, computers 
and science to enable the student to relate to the application skills required to today's technologist. 

3) The completion of a specialization in one of several high-tech high-demand fields such as 
Automotive Technology, Design Technology, Computer Information Systems, Electronics 
Technology, Machine Tool Technology, Manufacturing and Industrial Technology or Visual 
Communications Technology. 

Technology Division Goals 

1) To ensure that every graduate of the Technology Division possesses the technical skills to be 
successful in the workplace. 

2) To promote mastery of the general education skills needed to be successful in higher education and 
in the workplace. 

3) To develop basic and advanced skills that enhances ones ability to apply theory, analyze data, solve 
problems, use mathematics and utilize specialized equipment. 

4) To obtain qualified faculty both academically and technically 

5) To secure facilities and equipment conducive to learning the latest technology 

6) To provide local industry with highly qualified employees capable of meeting entry level skills or 
upgrading existing employees with advanced training. 

7) To develop articulation opportunities within each program with secondary and 4 year institutions. 

223 



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Community College of Indiana 

Ivy Tech State College 

One West 26th Street 

Indianapolis, IN 46208 

317.921.4800 

1.888.IVY.LINE 

www.ivytech.edu/indianapolis